A new way to store unused finish

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Over the years I have tried numerous ways to preserve finish, put in smaller containers, collapsa\ible containers, use marbles (who owns enough?) etc, but have not been satisfied. Eventually I get gummy finish on containers. My latest has been the collapsible containers and, while cheap enough, have caused me enough problems, especially with getting the lids off, to keep looking. I haven't tried bloxogen or CO2.
I suppose there is a mild bit of danger in the approach I took today, since I'm sure the electronics aren't vapor sealed and all, but I decided to put my partially unused tung oil/turps mix, about 12 oz, into a pint mason jar. I then used my wife's Vacu-seal, which has a mason jar adaptor, to draw the air out. No noticeable solvent smell. A nice tight seal, probably took less than 10 seconds. I did notice small bubbles appearing after it was sealed, which could mean the vacuum is strong enough to cause 'boiling' in the jar. I put a ring on it to make sure the seal wouldn't break.
Has anyone else tried this? It seemed relatively low risk given the quantities involved and all, yet I don't want to get written up for a Darwin award either if this is a known bad idea ;-)
Thoughts?
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Neat idea! haven't tried that one but sounds good.
On 24 Aug 2003 11:28:39 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@adelphia.net (Tom Bergman) wrote:

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On 24 Aug 2003 15:05:56 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Tony D.) wrote:

So do I, with excellent results.
Barry
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B a r r y B u r k e J r . wrote:

Same results here. I also try to remember to turn the cans over every few months. The solids stay dispersed a lot better. Once it's sat upside down for a few months turning it rightside up for a few months doesn't seem to hurt the seal.
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On Tue, 26 Aug 2003 06:13:02 -0400, BRuce <BRuce> pixelated:

Since most solvents used in finishing are combustible anyway, what's the difference? Ideally, nobody smokes around paint, finishes, or gasoline, Vern.
- - Let Exxon send their own troops - ------------------------------------------------------- http://diversify.com Comprehensive Website Programming
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I have watched many people fill up tractors and cars with gasoline (leaded) while smoking cigarettes. I also saw a filling station after it blew up from an idiot smoking. That was impressive!! Really neat!! And we don't have those defective genes in the pool anymore! But, look at how many heat and spark producing objetcs we have around us-light switches, motors, power tools, etc. Not to mention static electricity. Just trying to figure out where this "ideal" place is.
wrote:

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Assuming the person opening the can knew what was in it, it would be considerably less hazardous than using an aerosol can of finish. Opening a propane preserved can would release approximately the same volume of combust able gas as a good fart. It's inadvisable to have your face with a lit cigarette near either source of emissions.
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wrote:

Some of us have an overabundance of it, though. Especially after a few micro brews. <G>
Barry
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Larry Jaques wrote:

In a quart container, how many cc's of gas would be used for a barrier? How quickly would it dissipate?
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I think you already realize the possible danger in doing the Vacu-seal thing: combustible vapors. I'd AT LEAST look in the instruction booklet for a warning about such misuse. Failing that, I'd use the bloxogen instead. Trade money for possible calamity. Glad I don't live next door. I don't want my little house going up in a grand conflagration, as collateral damage to your mishaps. :)
dave
Tom Bergman wrote:

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Tom Bergman wrote:

I have a similar device, and notice the same "boiling" effect storing foods. I put a decent amount of (hot) fresh marinara sauce into the container and draw a vacuum, and it boils in the container until the temperature has a change to go down. Makes total sense, since boiling is triggered by a combination of temperature and air pressure, it's just weird to see it happen.
You can do this any time you want by putting some water at 180-190 degrees in the container and drawing a vacuum. If you're vacuum generator is strong enough, you can do it with room temperature water :-)
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Tom Bergman wrote:

The boiling you saw was probably the most volatile combust able volatiles in the mix. You probably drew some of them through the pump as well. I recommend doing it outdoors.
Dick
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Almost certainly it wasn't boiling. I agree with Dick below and add that oxygen, CO2, and other atmospheric gases are dissolved in many liquids at "normal" temperatures - it's how fish get their oxygen - and when the pressure is reduced, the gases are released.
Think "Coca Cola"!
DanD

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Sun, Aug 24, 2003, 11:28am (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@adelphia.net (TomBergman) says: Over the years I have tried numerous ways to preserve finish, put in smaller containers, collapsa\ible containers, use marbles (who owns enough?) etc, but have not been satisfied. <snip>
I usually get smaller quantities, and use it up before I run into storage problems. However. There is always a however.
However, awhile back I had occassion to use some latex paint that I had stored in plastic soda bottles. This worked just great, unbreakable, shake before using, etc. I found out tho, that if you don't use those frequently, the top gets welded on by the paint. I also found a new can of paint (l8 oz), that the top had rusted so I could barely get it open, for awhile thought I would have to punch holes in the lid. So had to cut the bottles open. I didn't want to go with bottles again, but had gotten some rectangular plastic storage containers from the grocery store, and they are great for keeping fasteners in, have a top, and are stackable (that's in an older thread).
So, gave the little containers a shot. Bottom line, working great so far. The lids do tend to stick a bit from the paint, but I can take a used popsicle stick and run it around, under the top, and it comes right off. I'm not sure just how air tight these lids are, but as it's latex, if it seems a bit thick, put a bit of water in, and stir with a popsicle stick. Beats the Hell out of cans. A couple of times I have mixed colors, for a special color, and keep that in a container. Then when I'm out, I can either mix up a new batch, or wash it, and use it for another color. Using red, yellow, blue, black, and white, I can pretty much come up with any color combo I need.
This works great for me, because I don't use a lot at a time, so the little 8 oz cans of latex last a really long time. Don't need to label what color is in one, because the container is clear plastic.
JOAT If we're all God's children, what's so special about Jesus?
Life just ain't life without good music. - JOAT Web Page Update 20 Aug 2003. Some tunes I like. http://community-2.webtv.net/Jakofalltrades/SOMETUNESILIKE /
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Jack-of-all-trades - JOAT wrote:

Lay a couple of pieces of Saran wrap over the mouth before capping.
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Dr. Rev. Chuck, M.D. P.A. wrote:

Another trick, if you have room to spare, stick them in the fridge. Also works for paint brushes/rollers/sponges. Wrap in plastic and stick them in the fridge and they'll last a long time before finally drying out.
Mmmmm, chicken a la mineral spirits. Best not done with solvent stuff.
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When I am finishing a piece, I keep the brushes/sponges for the oil based finishes in Ziploc bags in the freezer. They will usually last a couple of months before they become unusable ... certainly long enough for the two weeks it takes to put on 5 or 6 coats.
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Jack-of-all-trades - JOAT wrote:

$15 worth of gelled tung oil has a way of helping you remember.
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Phisherman wrote:

No oxygen, no "bomb", his storage method is less likely to spontaneously combust than a normally closed container, and the chance of that happening is real close to zero.
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My fridge has the conc. nitric acid stored in it !
(I need a workshop fridge !)
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