A bit OT but something most of us have in our shops.

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I have not really noticed another new, country of origin, playing a major roll in things we buy for our shops but Vietnam is here and from what I see the quality is pretty good, maybe pretty darn good.
Ten or twelve years ago I was looking at larger stacked tool chests, 40+" wide and because they were north of a thousand dollars I built my own and it has served me very well.
Recently I have noticed HD selling Milwaukee stacked tool chests and I have to do the touchy feely thing every time I am in the store.
Anyway my son and his girlfriend are renovating the guest bathroom in his house and he has been borrowing tools, not a problem at all. BUT he has been collecting his own tools and so far their storage location is on the garage floor around his small 2 drawer tool box. His birthday is this week and my wife suggested getting him a nice tool so that he does not have to borrow one of mine and I thought that was a good idea but then I pictured yet more garage floor space being used up increasing the tripping hazard. His significant other has mention this and told him that she will not be happy if she trips and falls. ;~)
Soooo I decided a real tool chest was in order instead of another tool and the Milwaukee came into mind and that is what we got him.
In particular this is the one we got for him.
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Milwaukee-30-in-12-Drawer-Steel-Tool-Storage-Chest-and-Rolling-Cabinet-Set-Textured-Red-and-Black-Matte-48-22-8530/206696101
These two units weigh in at 300 lbs and I ended up moving the two boxed units two times, From the store to my garage and then to his garage, I was a little fearful about all the loading and unloading and the damage that might result.
He and I wrestled the bottom cabinet to the garage floor and began the opening ceremony. He showed me how to break the welds on the fiberglass reinforced straps, that hold all of the pieces of the carton together, very easily with his fingers. I had always used a pocket knife. So the straps come off and the top lifts off. We see the typical paper product corner reinforcements that run down each corner and we see these also on the 4 top sides and IIRC 4 bottom sides. These angle pieces are solid multi layers of paper product with no corrugation, these things are strong. Next the molded Styrofoam top cover comes off as well as the four Styrofoam side panels around the perimeter. At this point the outer cardboard box is easily lifted out of the bottom tray and the plastic cover can now be removed. The shipping container was a work of art. The top box packaging was the same. No dents, no dings, no buckled corners and no scratched paint anywhere. Perfect!
Assembly was also a no brainer. While there was an instruction booklet, and it was well written, you really did not need it. Assembly involved bolting on the huge casters, lower box pull handle, cord storage brackets and braces to keep the top box in place on top of the bottom box.
A wrench was included to bolt the casters on and I will say it was pretty cheap so we resorted to using a 1/2" socket to tighten the caster bolts. Every bolt/screw attachment on the boxes screwed directly into threaded steel and welded nuts. The casters bolted directly into what appeared to be 4 pieces of 1/4 angle iron. Every threaded hole was precisely where it should be and there was no need to pry or force any bolts or screws. What a delight, both my son and I were amazed.
So the features of the box, red wrinkle paint on the boxes and smooth black drawers. Steel peg board on the back top of the top box, soft close full extension ball bearing slides, 100 lb rated. A circuit breaker protected built in power outlet with 4~5 outlets, a hinged work surface on the top of the top box bottom drawer, lite duty only, put your lap top in there and that drawer is individually lockable by it self. The 5"x2" HD casters are rated for 1,800 lbs and have a great set of levers to lock and unlock the break, the levers are side by side and you simply push down on the lock or unlock lever. The top box has a clam shell type lid with gas struts and with no front lip so that you can see every thing with out having to look up and over.
So I was impressed as was my son.
FWIW DeWalt and Porter Cable offer similar style boxes in brand appropriate colors, YELLOW and grey.
If this is any indication of the quality that we will be seeing coming out of Vietnam the Chinese will have to step up their game in a big way.
We looked at Harbor Freight first and saw a similar cheaply built top and bottom box for $150 less. Not at all worth the $150 savings IMHO.
I will probably replace my 30 year old 26" Craftsman with the 46" Milwaukee sooner than later. The Craftsman had dents straight out of the box when I bought it and it did not do well when we moved it from our old house to the new house 5 years ago.
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On 8/21/2016 11:07 AM, Leon wrote:

Intimately familiar with the general mindset of the Vietnamese, having lived with them for months, as the only "round eye" dodging bullets alongside them. Respect and fondness for those on our side, and a grudging respect for those on the opposite side.
Given a choice I'd much prefer to do business with the average Vietnamese individual than the Chinese. Damned shame we had to leave so many behind who were dedicated, proven friends.
Those who have made it over here to Texas have made good citizens. Have a lot of respect for Hubert Vo, in the Texas House, who's a personal acquaintance/local businessman, despite him being a Democrat. ;)
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
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For the most part I agree with you on this.
Yet it all brings back bad memories, and most of those memories were caused by our own government.
I have friends who part of their families went to France, and others here, with some still in their homeland. What a network of people, especially in international business, very enterprising and supportive of family.
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wrote:

years, and still have some, minus the wheels.
Thanks for the excellent report. Makes me want to take a look, but a Festool domino tool would get my vote first. :)
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On 8/21/2016 3:57 PM, OFWW wrote:

The bait dangled, the bait was swallowed, the hook is set. Now, will you run? LOL Good on you!
Just a little more on the tool chests. Craftsman was a good home garage box. And then there is Matco and Snapon and the like. Those are typically 10~15 times the price of a compatibly sized Craftsman.
Why so much more, they get lifted, full of tools, sat in the back of pick up trucks, and relocated many times in their life time and they hold up. Lifting a box with a thousand pounds plus of tools and having it bounce down the road is the hardest thing you can do to a box. Plus they get wet quite often when the floors in the shop get washed.
These Milwaukee boxes appear to be in between the inexpensive Craftsman type boxes and the upper end. If you could buy SnapOn and Matco at HD they would surely sell for half the price but you pay for the convenience of you rep coming around weekly to serve your needs.
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On 8/21/2016 5:29 PM, Leon wrote:

[snip]

But the nice thing about Snap-On and, I think, MATCO is that they have a mortgage loan officer right there on the sales truck. VERY convenient.
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On 8/21/2016 7:02 PM, Unquestionably Confused wrote:

Absolutely! LOL Most mechanics have as much invested in their tools as they do their homes. ;~)
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Leon wrote:

I was just explaining to a family member just HOW FAR a 3/8" and 1/2" ratchet set (and sockets), a set of imperial size and metric crescent wrenches and a set of screw drivers go. You could probably have all of the above for probably less than $150 (Craftsman). What more do those fancier names do for you? I mean, there seems to be much decreasing marginal utility. None of these tools have either broke nor bent, but I did get a 3/8" ratchet that had issues from the start (it was replaced). None have the least signs of rust either.
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On Monday, August 22, 2016 at 4:15:59 PM UTC-4, Bill wrote:

re: "a set of imperial size and metric crescent wrenches"
Yeah, I gotta get a metric crescent wrench one of these days. The imperial size one just won't adjust to those pesky mm sized nuts. ;-)
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Mine's imperial on one side and metric on the other. I can only loosen metric nuts or tighten imperial ones. I'm still trying to find it's mate, but it seems they're all the same way!
Puckdropper
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On Monday, August 22, 2016 at 4:40:41 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@googlegroups.com wrote:

I like it!
Actually, that's not as far fetched as it sounds.
Crescent makes a 2 ended wrench: Adjustable on one end with a pass-through socket handle on the other. The idea sounded good until I noticed that the pass-through sockets are combination sockets which they claim fit both imperial and metric. Any time I see anything that tries to act like X-Tools-In-One, I back away slowly.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Little sanity tip: Keep the metric tools in a separate toolbox.
I had a job this summer where I Really Needed two 1/2" crescent wrenches at the same time. That doesn't happen much. Well, I thought I did, it turned out it wasn't necessary to remove those nuts--which were real buggers! I did'nt like hitting my crescent wrench with a hammer (I covered it with a rag first).
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On Monday, August 22, 2016 at 6:18:46 PM UTC-4, Bill wrote:

We appear to have a difference in terminology here. What is your definition of a "crescent wrench"?
Where I grew up a Crescent wrench was the most well known brand name for an adjustable wrench as shown here:
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/31Tj3HRVIeL.jpg
Specific sized wrenches, even if made by Crescent were "open end" or "box" wrenches.
If someone said "Hand me the Crescent wrench", you knew they meant the adjustable wrench.
If you do a Google search on Crescent wrench, the overwhelming majority (almost 100%) of the images are of adjustable wrenches, even if not made by Crescent.
I guess that's why I find the term "metric Crescent wrench" a little strange. My brain says "An adjustable wrench is neither metric nor imperial."
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

"My bad", then. I knew Crescent was an old manufacturer, and I thought it was a generic term for "open-ended wrench". What you call a Crescent wrench, I was brought up with as a "pipe wrench". I probably would not have used the term Crescent until I was exposed to it a few weeks ago. I'll be careful in the future! By the way, I have an old set of these:
http://alloy-artifacts.org/Photos/tools/crescent_oe1618_c1725b_wrench_f_cropped_inset.jpg

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On Tuesday, August 23, 2016 at 2:58:52 AM UTC-4, Bill wrote:

Don't worry, there is no "my bad" here. :-)
What there is is kind a of a mix-up between types of wrenches and manufactu rer's names, which I am guilty of also.
Crescent makes all kinds of wrenches, adjustable, open end, box, etc. If so meone was brought seeing open end wrenches made by Crescent, it would make sense that that is what they call a crescent wrench. I grew up with adjusta bles by Crescent, so that's what stuck with me.
Now, I do have to say that I've never known an adjustable wrench of the typ e I am speaking of to be called a pipe wrench. A pipe wrench is adjustable, but it's a totally different animal, both in terms of design and operation . The movable jaw of a pipe has a very specific reason for being "sloppy". It's designed that way so that grips the round surface of a pipe when force is a pplied.
This is pipe wrench:
http://www.harborfreight.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33 525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/i/m/image_17373.jpg
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On 8/23/2016 7:02 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

[snip]

Or a "Stillson Wrench" ;)

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On Tuesday, August 23, 2016 at 8:42:14 AM UTC-4, Unquestionably Confused wr ote:

ake sense that that is what they call a crescent wrench. I grew up with adj ustables by Crescent, so that's what stuck with me.

ble, but it's a totally different animal, both in terms of design and opera tion. The movable jaw of a pipe has a very specific reason for being "slopp y". It's

As opposed to a Monkey Wrench...
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4e/Monkey_and_Stillson_wre nches.png
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On 8/23/2016 1:58 AM, Bill wrote:

Typically the company that is the first to invent/market a particular style tool is how the tool gets it's name.
Crescent Wrench the adjustable wrench, Allen Wrench the hex wrench, Skil Saw the circular saw, Channellock Plyers the slip joint plyers, Torx wrench the star wrench, Phillips driver, cross head driver.
And sometimes what the tool is originally named sticks. Milwaukee "Sawsall" a recip saw, and probably the "Domino" when the Festool patent expires.
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On 8/23/2016 7:18 AM, Leon wrote:

Oh! Add "The Kodak" the camera. ;~)
and
The Polaroid Camera the instant camera.
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wrote:

Aspirin, Xerox, Band-Aid,...
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