45d bevels using the Jointer?

I'm assembling some boxes using 45d miter joints and was wondering if anyone has used the jointer to put a perfect beveled edge on 3/4" finply. Using the table saw I get just a smidgeon of play near the end of the cut if the sharp edge crumbles a bit. Seems like the jointer would not only get a nice clean edge, but it would be dead flat as well. I'm thinking of some type of sled.
JP
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My jointer (PM54a) has a tilting fence that does exactly what you want to do.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...

you'll like what the plywood does to the knives. I made the mistake of edge jointing 3/4 plywood, (to take out some saw marks), and it nicked the knives pretty badly. I really need to get them sharpened. I really never knew it until I face jointed some boards and saw the ridges that the nicked blades made.
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Many jointers will bevel the edge to 45 degrees. But do you really want to use that method for making 45's for your boxes?
The problem is that you will have a difficult time of ending up with pieces the ending up at the EXACT width or length that they need to be. If your pieces are not exactly the right size, the 45 degree angles will not close.
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When you say "boxes" do you mean jewelry box size or display stand size? Are you making completely closed boxes or mitered corners on the front, back and sides with a bottom in a dado and the lid in a frame that sits on top?
As others have noted, running ply, even baltic, russian or finnish ply over HSS jointer knives is asking for nicked knives. Unless you get the fence set up just right, exposing the knives only the EXACT width of the ply you're going to change the dimensions of the parts if you over shoot the blade exposure.
There's another way to do mitered corners on ply that uses a router table, a precision position- able fence and either a 45 degree chamfer bit or a "miter lock" router bit. It does require that all initial parts have - parallel edges that are square to the face - straight edges - square corners Any errors in the above will show in the finished joints. The miter lock method also requires some trial and error set up of the fence AND the height of the router bit. Here's a link (which has links to more about this bit and it's set up). All one line so watch the line wrap.
http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/SharpeningCenter/SharpeningCenter4.html
And here's a web page I just put together on doing a completely encloded box using a lock miter bit - just for you. What service! Again - all one line so watch the line wrap.
http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/LockMiter/LockMiterBox1.html
hope this gets you further along your journey.
charlie b
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Sorry for the top post....
Thanks for the input Charlie. I'm making toolboxes for my nephews out of 3/4" bb plywood. If I were to do it over I'd get a "cheap" lock mitre bit for the router and be done with it.
JP

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