3/4" thick glass door hinge

I have a commission that requires me to hang 2 doors made of laminated glass and urethane. It's 17" x 48", and weighs about 50 pounds..3/4" thick. This is a free standing cabinet on casters to top it off. 40" wide 20" deep 60" tall. The company that makes the panels is the one commissioning me. They can drill holes anywhere I want. 3/4" thick is the potential problem as far as off the shelf hardware. I like the idea of a pair of pivot hinges, putting the weight of the door on the bottom rather than the cabinet sides...( torque ) This is a nice looking hinge if it could handle the thickness... http://www.sugatsune.com/products/ProductDetails.cfm?CATID=7&SUBCATID=1&PRODUCTID=GP%2D40
So any ideas from the peanut gallery ??? Joel
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RODUCTID=GP%2D40
Consider machining away the thinner side of the channel thus making it "one-sided".
cheers Bob
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And what would hold the glass ?

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On 28 Dec 2004 04:53:39 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Bob K 207) wrote:

I might be wrong [been there], but isn't the glass held in by turning the two screws for compression? With no second side, there's nothing to hold it in place unless drilled through ...still an option.
I'd contact the hinge company. They seem to know what they're doing and might affer soem advice ...they want your business.
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On Tue, 28 Dec 2004 09:13:18 -0500, Guess who

In those I've seen, the glass usually fits into them as somewhat of a compression fit with sticky tape. (I repaired my vent windows in that same manner.) Then the setscrews enhance that holding power, sometimes against rubber-coated plates which distribute the screw's pressure.

Very good idea. For the end customer's sake, the style of hinge he showed us would be good. Through-holes might double the cost of a replacement to the end user.
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thick.
deep
problem as

hinges,
I probably missed something, because I haven't been following this thread, but am I correct in reading 3/4 inch glass? If so, I'd have to ask why? That's a LOT of glass.
--

-Mike-
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That's what they want.... the glass is a product of theirs and I guess they want to show it off on the doors...

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Although not 3/4" thick aren't glass shower doors hinged with a clamping type hinge? No holes just a very sticky gasket material between the clamp and the glass.
S
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they
I guess that makes sense enough. In that case I would not be looking at *any* off the shelf solutions. 3/4 inch glass is going to weigh a ton and standard hardware is not going to handle it. Equally, any hardware that simply screws into a wood frame with 5/8 wood screws is going to be put to the test. Again, I haven't kept on top of this thread from the beginning, so I apologize if I'm asking something that has been covered already, but what are your design plans for carrying this glass? I'm assuming the rest of the cabinet is also 3/4 inch glass, framed with wood? You're certainly going to need a lot of counter balance to offset the weight of that plate when it opens. This is taking on the nature of a neat sort of issue...
--

-Mike-
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Yes the rest of the cabinet is the same glass... the back is going to be 3/4 plywood. The bottom of this unit is going to have 2 doors, closed cabinet. As for the counter weight... I plan on having a false back in that bottom compartment and I will fill that with buck shot and the sides of the upper are the 3/4 glass to I would think that should help the situation. I plan on making the bottom unit very rigid. Double 3/4 inch wall all around and the very top, where they want lights will also be a torsion box. I'm still concerned about racking on the cabinet... then the doors could have problems or just not sit straight.. Being on wheels certainly isn't helping...

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Those style hinges look like a winner. Maybe look into similiar style hinges used on glass shower doors for the thickness needed? Also, cabinet you described sounds as if it would be really easy to tip over with those big glass doors open on it, be careful! --dave

http://www.sugatsune.com/products/ProductDetails.cfm?CATID=7&SUBCATID=1&PRODUCTID=GP%2D40
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The sides of the cabinet will have the same panels.. that will add weight to the piece and I plan on filling the bottom back with lead buckshot... I hope this will deal with the problem

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Since this is a heavy custom piece of work, you might not find an off the shelf solution for the hinges. Why not talk to a couple of local machine shops and just have them make you a set of pivots? This way you can make them as beefy as you need and won't have to settle on something of inferior quality or style.
It seems to me if you started with some stainless channel and had the shop weld a couple of 1/4" pins on the bottom these could be set into a small plate with a nice little nylon bushing, and perhaps even a thrust washer on the bottom.
Probably would not cost that much to do and the stainless can be either brush finished or buffed to a high polish.
--

Roger Shoaf

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