110, 220, 208 Volt Electrical Outlet Question

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No. That is correct. A two pole breaker is designed to be installed that way. The breaker should be a single 2-pole breaker, and not two 1-pole breakers.
(Greg) writes:

240v
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No by being stacked on each other they ARE on different phases. If they were side by side you would have an issue.
(Greg) writes:

240v
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You breaker box bus bars are designed so that every other slot going down each side are on alternate busses. Go to your local Home Depot or whatever and look at one of the circuit breaker panel boxes on display. Once you see one opened up and empty, it'll all make sense.
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Lost,
The bus bars kind if zig zag inside the pannel so that adjacent slots (one over the other), by design, connect to apposing bus bars.
-Steve

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Al Reid wrote:

Typically a house is supplied with a single 240volt phase center tapped. Neutral is connected to this center tap and thus pole to pole voltage is 240 and pole to centertap is 120.
208 volt service is derived from 120 volt three phase "wye" power where one pole from each phase is tied together. Neutral is connected to this junction which yields 120 volts pole to neutral and 208 volts pole to pole. The difference is that the 208 is derived from two phases that are 120 degrees apart. 120 volts * sin(pi/3) * 2 = 207.6 volts.
Some utility companies just tap into two phases to give the 208 to a residential unit, though this is rare. Usually they step a single 7200 volt or so single phase line into center tapped 240.
-Bruce
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supplied.
120/240.
Correct, that is what I said.

Actually it is the other way around. 120V single phase is derrived from a 208V 3 phase Y connected transformer.
In any case, the rest of what you said is correct as well.

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Al Reid wrote:
I said.

My bad, the stated voltage is the maximum pole to pole voltage
For those interested, the diagram at the bottom of the page details this.
http://www.eatonelectrical.com/unsecure/html/101basics/Module04/Output/TransformerConfigurations.html
-Bruce
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So can I plug my table saw into it or what?
wrote in message

a
http://www.eatonelectrical.com/unsecure/html/101basics/Module04/Output/TransformerConfigurations.html
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You stated in another post that you have ~240V line-line. Assuming it has the correct plug/receptacle combination, it sounds like you should be good to go.
wrote in message

where
this
from
this.
http://www.eatonelectrical.com/unsecure/html/101basics/Module04/Output/TransformerConfigurations.html
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LostInSpace wrote:

Hey! don't go off topic here! ;)
Yes you can. If you measure 240 then as long as you TS is wired for it you are all set -Bruce
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It works! Thx.

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By the chart it's a 2 pole 3 wire 250V (two 15 amp breakers) thx. So it's for a heater, right?

(AKA
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What's the number? I'm guessing from your description that it's a 6-15R? If so, that's exactly what you need for plugging a typical 3HP 220V cabinet saw into.
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Yep 6-15P. It worked. Thx.
wrote:

it's
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I'm an electrician living in Canada. Pay attention to that. 120V5V0V. These are the same voltage. Single phase. Used in a house, everywhere.
220V-240V are the same. Single phase also. Used only for bake oven and dryer
208V is the voltage of a 3 phase circuit. I suggest you go outside and check out the wire(s) that connect your house.
If the wire has 3 wires, 2 black cover wires and an uncovered aluminum ground wired, it is the single phase one 120/240. Every house has this one.
If the wire has 4 wires, 3 black cover wires and an uncovered aluminum ground wired, it is the 3 phase voltage 208V.
You can have both of them connected to your house. It is rare but it can happen. Pay attention to that.
Also, you can't replace 208V by 220V. It's not the same thing at all.
I suggest you call someone who knows well electricity (an electrician) before attempting to do something with it, if you don't want to burn any electric things.
Cool
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Hmm, usually when they speak 208 they are talking 3-phase. Don't usually see this in a house. Well unless your in Barcelona and then it's 280 with the usual brown out :)
mark

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