What constitutes reasonable wear (cordless drill)

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I bought an 18v Erbauer drill from Screwfix about 15 months ago. It has been a superb tool. I've used it almost every weekend for the past 15 months.
It's recently developed significant play, not in the chuck, but in the motor-case mounting. I can't see anything broken, looks like it has just worn loose.
When I bought it I paid ~160, and it's now available for 140.
Other than this play, the drill still performs perfectly. I don't think I've abused the drill, and I don't think it's been dropped hard. It has had a lot of heavy use.
My dilemma is this - given that I've had lots of use from it, can I reasonably expect it to be repaired/replaced under the two year warranty?
I'm not asking whether they would - there's only one way of finding that out. I'm asking if I would be reasonable to ask, it's kind of an ethical thing. I don't believe in taking the piss with my suppliers.
So, what do you think? How long should a 150+ cordless drill last with heavy use?
TIA
--
Grunff


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So, definitely not heavy Trade use, though it's pretty much a premium price item (150 quid, right)? And it's not been kicked about, carried in the bottom of overladen cloth toolbags, or the like.

I think for an Erbauer at that price it's reasonable to ask (but would be unreasonable to raise an enormous fuss if they turn you down). For a Ferm it'd be taking the Michael; for a Makita, Atlas Copco, or similar with the "less than a couple of days a week" usage and kind treatment it'd definitely be a premature failure.
HTH, YMMV, OITMMBCTTA, etc - Stefek
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snipped-for-privacy@hp.com wrote:

Yeah, I paid 160, but they're at 140 now. Definitely not trade use, just me at weekends, and definitely well taken care of.

Thanks.
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As IME the battery will probably be the weakest part, if anything else breaks before the first battery is knackered it doesn't seem unreasonable to me to expect a warrenty repair (you are still on your first battery?)
tim

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tim wrote:

Yes, first battery - well, pair of batteries, which came with the drill. They've lasted pretty well, which I think is largely to do with the very good 1hr charger that came with the drill.
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Presumably this is Screwfix 71776?
On the web site, and the catalogue, they use the description "high performing". I think that that would be good enough for me to invoke the warranty. If this were a <50 job, maybe not, but at 140 I would expect more.
I don't know if you have the latest Axminster catalogue, but they have included a page (pp1.02) of classification ratings. For some time they've put classifications on their power tools and machinery of hobby, light trade, trade and industrial.
The definitions are helpful in knowing what to expect and in a subtle way they are informing their customers, which I think is a good thing to do. It's a guideline, but I think a reasonable one.
I'll paraphrase the definitions:
Hobby ==== Lower power, light build, one person for light and occasional heavy work. Looked after, not continuous use, not income generation, up to 100 hrs/year. e.g. Perform brand.
Light Trade ======== Higher power, heavier build, used by 2-3 people in small company or keen hobbyist. Occasional site use or kitchen fixing. SOme rough handling but usually well looked after. Occasional heavy work. Used for income generation, use up to 300 hrs/yr.
Trade ==== Continuously rated, high power and heavy duty. Expected use by 6+ people in medium sized businesses, workshops or small production facilities, site use. Some rough handling during site use. Used to the tool's limit with heavy work periods. Essential for income generation. Up to 1000 hrs/yr.
Industrial ====== Continuously rated, high power and heavy duty. Expected use by people in large sized businesses, workshops or large production facilities, site use. Rough handling during site use and not well looked after, but maintained in workshop use. Used to the tool's limit with heavy work periods. Essential for income generation. Up to 1500+ hrs/yr.
In the context of these I think I'd pitch the Erbauer drill in the light trade category. You've used it every weekend but not every day. Therefore again, I think it's reasonable that it should have lasted longer.
For example, Axminster do an 18v cordless combi drill in their "White" brand rated for light trade at 90 inc.
The trade rated ones are all branded and are 250+
.andy
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Andy Hall wrote:

That's the one - except mine was before they had a side handle.

I do have it, and I'd spotted the definitions, which are very helpful. But thanks for repeating them in case I didn't have the catalogue.

Which may well be my replacement for the Erbauer.

And as much as I'd love to have a 'proper' one, I just can't get over the mental hurdle of paying quite that much for a weekend-only tool, not just at the moment anyway.
Thanks for your thoughts.
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Another direction you could consider if you don't specifically need the hammer action is the Makita 6228DWE. I had one of these with three batteries as a deal from Axminster. Frankly, it is OK with two during almost all jobs, swapping battery packs with the 1hr charger.
It has a very good speed and torque control which does a good job with slow driving of screws at high torque.
I've used mine solidly for (I guess) two years and it remains very solid as a trade rated tool.
.andy
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Andy Hall wrote:

Hmm..While I don't use hammer on the cordless that much, there have been several occasions where not having hammer would've been very inconvenient - necessitating making up 100m+ extension leads.
I suppose one possibility is that if Screwfix won't replace/repair, I keep the Erbauer and use it only when I need cordless hammer, and get myself a non-hammer Mak.
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And further strengthening GrVIPunff's case ;-), I note that the front cover of the current (vol. 71) Screwfix cat has a flash reading: "CHECK OUT - LOWEST PRICES - for - PROFESSIONAL POWER TOOLS" followed by 4 logos: Bosch, Erbauer, DeWalt, Makita. Which shows their own advertising places the Erbauer in the same sort of bracket as those other brands - so a polite invocation of the 2-year guarantee seems justified.
HTHSM, Stefek
(As an aside - me, I prefer a lighter less-to-go-wrong non-hammer cordless (or two ;-), leaving heavier duties to corded drills. I've accumulated both a "normal" B&D which hangs by the bench, close to the vice, and spends much time drilling through metal at lowish speeds, and a fair bit of time in one of those vertical stands (yeah, I've not yet succumbed to a dedicated pillar drill ;-) and sees very little of its hammer action since the arrival of the 'cuts through concrete and masonry like a normal twist drill through softwood' SDS. Sure, if you're only going to get one drill, a cordless combi is probably the nicest thing all round; and if your property has whole wings/floors where the 'lectric has yet to reach the attractions of cordless increase. But for my situation at least, separation of duties allows each tool to be bought to be closer to "just right" for a narrower range of tasks, rather than just "usable" across a broad range.)
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snipped-for-privacy@hp.com wrote:

I tend to use my DeWalt SDS for almost all wall drilling, my Bosch mains for most metals/other general, and my Erbauer cordless when I need to be cordless. The last few weeks I've been completing my shed project, which has involved a fair bit of cordless hammering, all be it into soft Thermalites.

I bought a 50 Clarke pillar drill many years ago, and would highly recommend it. Despite the appalling lack of precision, I still find it a lot better than a drill in a stand.
> Sure, if you're only going to get one drill, a

Or stables/pump house/shed/etc. The cordless is pretty indispensable for me.
I took the Erbauer apart tonight, and what's happened is that the motor-gearbox mount, which is a very poorly designed plastic bayonet fitting, has developed a lot of play. I suspect that this is largely due to hammer action. Since I can't think of a fix, I will be contacting Screwfix tomorrow.
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I've got one stage worse - the B&Q 39 quid jobby. Several years old now. I did take it apart and have the 'keyway' properly machined which allowed the slop adjustment to be set to something approaching reasonable. I also changed the rear pillar for a slightly longer one to allow taller objects to fit in the vice.
What makes it head an shoulders above an electric drill in a stand is the slow speed and much lower noise being an induction motor. Excellent value.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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wrote:

cover
That is why it is always best to get a power tool with a decent guarantee. PP Pro from B&Q and Ferm from Screwfix are 3 years. Ferm are low rent models but that guarantee means you don't get ripped off.
I see Argos have a two levels of quality on their Challenge range, like B&Q with PP and PP Pro. Do the Excel versions (I think it is that) have longer guarantees?
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The other problem with this philosophy apart from the poorer quality during use is the time wasted in returning them and having the argument with the retailer. That is very expensive.
.andy
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Twice the space :-(
Two crappy products != one good product.

.andy
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Andy Hall wrote:

Now now Andy - we've already established that he has real trouble with !=.
Probably don't teach that kind of stuff in honest, down-to-earth universities.
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I suppose we shouldn't cast our perls before swine......
.andy
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Andy Hall wrote:

You've been saving that one, right? ;-)
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The not equal "!=" came from computer programming. Do you know what they are?
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IMM wrote:

They being "computer programming"?
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