Using 10MM pipe for bathroom and kitchen taps

Just wondering if anyone has done this before and if there are any potetial problems with doing it. Also i am installing a combi boiler and was wondering what sort of pipe size i should use for the shower/bath.
I would think 10mm would be to small for the shower/bath but doing really want to go over 15mm due to space. what would be a reason for having say 22mm pipe over 15mm.
Thanks for your help.
Pete
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I currently use 15mm copper for the 16m run to my bath and that is adequate but I do have a very high head on my H/W supply (~20m). I did try it with 10mm but it was just too small and the bath took ages to fill.
I have a 3m run to my kitchen sink in 10mm and that is fine but if the run was any longer, I don't think it would be adequate.
Pros are less time to get hot water to the taps and also less wasted hot water sitting in the pipe when you are finished, but cons are greater interaction between taps eg, no flow from sink tap while filling a bath, but you will get that with a combi anyway.
If I ever get this house finished it will have separate small bore feeds to each bath/shower/large sink.
btw, be aware that plastic pipes have a smaller internal diameter than copper and so will be more restrictive for a given (outer) size.
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fred

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Fatter the pipe, higher the flow.
In your case this stops being true when the pipe is so fat the bioiler cant heat the water fast enough.
Rick
On 14 Nov 2003 05:07:14 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@blackjade.net (Peter Charlwood) wrote:

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wrote:

10mm is too small and 15mm should be ok. Usually, baths have 22mm to the taps but 9 times out of 10, this comes off a 15/22/15 tee, so no benefit to the 22 mm.
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It's the standard size for domestic water in much of the rest of Europe, but only for short runs - i.e. 15 or 20 mm is used for the majority of the run, then 10mm from the wet wall to the tap.
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     snipped-for-privacy@blackjade.net (Peter Charlwood) writes:

I wouldn't want to use 10mm for a bath, although there's about 15" of it doing my washbasin tap, and the flow is probably good enough for a bath with good mains pressure behind it (and rather high for a washbasin;-).
I would use 22mm for a long run from a header tank. I would avoid it for a run to short use hot tap, as it will increase the amount of cold water wasted waiting for hot to run through. When replumbing my house, I swapped all the 22mm for 15mm as it's all mains water pressure. None of the runs were long, but it did make a noticable improvement to the time for water to run hot. Made no noticable difference to flow rate.
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Andrew Gabriel

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