Toliet bowl empties over time

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Jon wrote:

No, an admittance valve is fitted on a stack above the toilet. You don't have a stack to fit it on.

There has to be a vent somewhere on the drain. On older properties they used to put a pipe approx 4' high, near the manhole cover, which had some sort of flap in it. Over the years these pipes can get blocked or even removed by people who don't understand their function.
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BillR wrote:

"Oh is that what it was"...:-)
Mine was about 6" high on the septic tanks....:-) However there was indeed
another one added later going way up to the gables, froma branch drain...

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wrote:

There _ought_ to be. I've lived in several houses where there weren't, especially on "second toilet" conversions like this.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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My outside loo - built over 100 years ago - has no vent, it goes direct to the manhole. The inside loo has a normal vent, and there's also one just under the front window. Dunno how that works without letting smells out.
--
*The colder the X-ray table, the more of your body is required on it *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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On Fri, 17 Oct 2003 15:43:45 +0100, Jon wrote:

Everyone is going for the suction option. But that would only lower the level an inch or so below the top of the trap. Once you get a reasonable gap you need *a lot* of suction to pull more water out of the bottom of the bend. I think you'd notice that level of suction when it was full, by the noise of glugging...
Is there any heating in this loo? Think of another property of water evaporation... This would explain how the bend could become "nearly empty".
--
Cheers snipped-for-privacy@howhill.com
Dave. pam is missing e-mail
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...

That would be my thought too. I have a couple of places that stand empty for extended periods and one of the jobs I have to do when I go in is to flush the loos and run taps, to fill up the various traps again.
Colin Bignell
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Jon,
You don't have a crack in the porcelain, do you? Everyone (almost) seems (understandably) to have focussed on pressures - but if the level goes right down I can't think of anything but a leak of some sort.
Rod
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Rod Hewitt wrote:

That occurred to me too, but I assumed Op would have noticed smelly water on his floor? But maybe its leaking unseen underneath the pan and seeping through floorboards? Yuck! I have seen this in an old house .....
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