Toilet positioning, confused...

Hello All
I have a standard 110mm clay sewer waste fitting. The center of this hole is 220mm from the wall I want to mount the cistern onto. Is this unusually far from the wall?
Pretty much all of the close-coupled WC's in the Heritage catalogue have a distance shown from back-waste to wall of 110mm.
How would I go about fitting this, or is it possible?
I don't really want the cistern sticking off the wall on a chunk of wood as it is now (on another wall, 3 elbow connectors jointed together to use the same exit). Only options I can think of, unless I've got this completely confused, are to build out the wall with a sheet or two of plasterboard, OR, fit a high level cistern that allows me a further distance from the wall for the pan.
It's my first WC, please be gentle. :)
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Simon Avery, Dartmoor, UK
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

All 3 of my close-coupled toilets have outlet pipes whose centres are about 100mm from the wall - so it sounds as if yours was designed for a different sort of toilet.
If you didn't want to use a high level cistern, you could probably use a low level one which *isn't* close coupled - but is joined with a J tube. Obviously, the pan would need a rear rather than top feed to accommodate this. [At least with this arrangement, the bleeding seat will stay up!]
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Set Square
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wrote:

And he'll be able to clear a blocked bog without disconnecting the water supply and taking the whole works off the wall.
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Niall

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Hello Set

Bum, that's not what I wanted to hear.
What I wanted to hear was "No, it's perfectly normal and you won't have any problem getting a toilet to fit."
Moving WC out is no longer an option - it'll bring it too close to the basin on the other wall. So, it looks like Simon will be moving the soil pipe instead, a job I was desperately trying to avoid.
That was the one thing I said "I can't change", so now it's just the DG window unit, the ceiling, half a floor and 2 of the walls that I /won't/ be replacing. (100% new plumbing, retiling all walls, half the floor boards are rotten, 3 of the joists are gone...)
Thanks anyway. I'll probably still be working on this bathroom in 2005... :)
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Simon Avery, Dartmoor, UK
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On Tue, 06 Jan 2004 20:36:03 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@digdilem.org (Simon Avery) wrote:

Look on the bright side. At least you're not moving the soil pipe when it's a concrete floor. ;-)
.andy
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Like mine :-/
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had this problem myself: solution was to find bog which matched hole :-((((
later discovered you can get flexible plastic trap-to-hole in floor connectors (seen in travis perkins): haven't tried them myself, however.
outdoor stack pipes (where you can push the connector straight out of the wall) make for far less matching trouble. unfortunately IIRC these were off limits building regs-wise c. 1980 for a time, so there's lots of house around with internal stacks.
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Hello Andy

Yes!
Actually not as big a job (aha) as I'd expected. The glazed stub pipe broke off when I was moving a floorboard there, and the kwikfit widgets will go straight into the sub-floor connector, so I can use those to gain enough movement to put pan where I want it now.
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Simon Avery, Dartmoor, UK
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On Mon, 12 Jan 2004 15:59:07 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@digdilem.org (Simon Avery) wrote:

You are using a car exhaust pipe? ;)
PoP
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I'd install a concealed cistern toilet. You build a cabinet at worktop height exactly as far as you need to install the waste. The cistern goes behind. The toilet backs on to the "wall". You use kitchen or bathroom worktop on top of the cabinet. It is cleaner and neater and you gets lots of worktop space. If it is wide enough, you can install a semi or fully recessed basin in there too. I prefer semis myself, as the "rim" is far too wide on a fully recessed.
Christian.
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On Mon, 5 Jan 2004 11:09:19 -0000, "Christian McArdle"

But don't do it like far too many installations I've seen and tile the whole lot up solid afterwards. You *will* need maintenance access to the cistern, pipework and pan connector at some point.
People get so upset when you explain the choice between keeping their blocked / faulty bog for evermore, or a sledge hammer to their beautifully tiled kharzi.
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It took many days of thinking before I worked out how to do mine without a horrible hatch in the worktop or wall. In the end, I designed it with a small top panel that slotted behind a horizontal trim that ran the full length of the cabinet at handle height. This gave some access to the cistern for inspection and allowed you to remove the handle. This allowed you to release the large bottom panel, which gave access to the entire cistern. Since I fitted it, I had to replace the entire syphon, so I'm glad I did! The panels were T&G boarding with about 30 coats of varnish.
Christian.
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