SWMBO will not be amused

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Huh?
She didn't have feet which went off the width scale :-(
But I don't have bunions or squashed toes or any of the other ills of too-tight shoes :-)
The answer to your question is no. But I WOULD like to know what you meant by 40-30 ...
Mary

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On Wed, 22 Oct 2003 19:59:32 UTC, "Mary Fisher"

Deuce.
--
Bob Eager
rde at tavi.co.uk
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He's keeping score, tennis-style, in the good-natured spat you're having. He asserts you're at game point. No pressure, mind ;-)
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Not in my name: <http://www.stopwar.org.uk /
wrote:

meant
Oh, of course!
It's such a l-o-n-g time since I played. Can't get the pumps you know ...
Mary
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Mary Fisher wrote:

The people employed by the companies financed by the women who buy them?
If my admittedly limited knoweldge of the fashion industry is anything to go on, its as likely to be a woman as a man on the sketchpad.

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How about cutting a rectangular section of marine ply big enough to comfortably cover the existing hole. Then cut a hole for the new sink in the ply. Screw and glue the ply in place over the existing hole, then tile it with tiles that coordinate with the current worktop (or maybe plain white). Finally refit the sink. Not perfect, but a) it might go some way towards pacifying SWMBO and b) gives you an excuse to buy an electric tile cutter.
Just a thought Clive
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<snip>

the
white).
<snip>
Another suggestion for a temporary fix....
cut out a new peice of worktop slightly wider than the sink by a few inches at each end, and fit the new sink into it. cut out same size from existing worktop plus 1/8 inch extra or so at each end, then insert new unit using those horrible metal or plastic worktop joining strips.
At least SWMBO gets to use her new sink until you get chance to replace the whole worktop properly....
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No way. I didn't buy me a brand spanking new Trend T9 router and kitchen worktop jig recently to start putting these manky aluminium joining strips in.....
I'm joining the club of "real" worktop joins from now on......just picked up my first job for one the end of last week.....
PoP
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so what kind of worktop is it?
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i suppose it doesn't really matter what kind of worktop, but I am guessing it's a standard laminated chipboard ...... ANYWAY
get a piece of stainless steel larger than the sink, I doubt it will cost you more than a tenner. put the sink upside down on the steel and mark out adding about half an inch, then mark out to cut the sink in to the steel, cut it all out and take off the sharp edges, and you have yourself a stainless steel sink washer that will fit in perfectly with your sink and cover the gaps.
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PoP wrote:

How about a nice hardwood "plinth" that sits under the edge of the sink all the way round the perimeter. That way the sink sits on a small platform that raises it (say) 1/2". That would save you needing to match the worktop finish or from needing to do an invisible join with a bit of new worktop.
A front on view:- __ _____\ plinth-> /______\ ------------- \ Worktop \ <- edge of sink ------------- \
Well varnished to match the woodwork in the kitchen and with a nice routed edge it could actually look quite nice.
If you did not want the extra height you could do the same but route a rebate into the existing worktop to accept the thickness of the new plinth.
__ ________ _____\ w.top |______\ ------------- \ \ <- edge of sink \
--
Cheers,

John.

/=================================================================\
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On Tue, 21 Oct 2003 17:35:49 +0100, John Rumm

Hadn't really thought of that idea, but it sounds reasonably feasible.
Except that I don't think there's enough gap at the back of the worktop to do the rebate in-situ. And it's a 4m worktop conveniently held in place by tile on 3 sides and a worktop joint at one end - not so easy to whip it out and put it back.
She's home now. Not very happy..... :(
PoP
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wrote:

plinth.
There's no real reason to rebate the back for a solution that's only going to last until you can replace the worktop and do job properly. You might have difficulty rebating the sides to get into the back corners, but then that's the time when the sharp chisels come out and you finish it off by hand.
Of course, if you hadn't bought such a big router in the first place you'd get a lot closer... ;-)
cheers Richard -- Richard Sampson
email me at richard at olifant d-ot co do-t uk
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