Stupid questions about feather edge cladding

I want to put some feather edge cladding on a shed. A mate was going to do it for me but he's let me down so I'll have to do it myself. I've checked the FAQs and done lots of Google searches but can't find the answers to my questions, maybe because they're too obvious.
The boards I've got are about 2.5m long and 6" wide.
How far should they overlap each other? What sort of nails are best for fixing them? (I've found conflicting answers to this on the web) How far in from the edges should the nails go? Do I need to treat the boards with anything before I put them up or can I just creosote them after they're fixed in place?
Hope someone can answer this, or point me in the direction of some website which gives a complete idiot's guide to cladding.
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Ask in uk.rec.gardening .... it's kinda garden related.... L
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4-LOM wrote:

THey do swell and contract alot outside so it is worth being careful with the fixings. Make sure the thin end is covered by the next plank, and the thick end visible. Nail through in a single line just above the overlap to allow for the natural movement.
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Whatever nails you use wire or oval,tap the sharp end of the nail to blunt it,this will prevent the feather edge splitting as it is prone to do.Normally they overlap by a quarter but you could if you wish go up to a third especially as it is for a shed.Are the boards being used vertical or horizontal
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Thanks for the tips (very good ASCII art :)). I was thinking of putting creosote substitute (or something similar) on them once they're up, but given that they are likely to swell and contract, will this expose parts of the wood which were previously covered by the next board and so didn't get coated with cresoste?
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4-LOM wrote:

I painted liberally with Ronseal Timbercare, and sure enough had surprisingly large white stripes exposed in Summer so had to do it again. Incidentally painting was very hard work on the raw boards, so I used a sprayer the second time. I would consider painting each board before fixing as that would certainly solve it.
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spaced and cover the area required. Keeping them spaced equally is the main problem and they look terrible if you mess that up.

them (thin edge up) means the weight is taken by the smallest section. I always thought that is daft.

you will only expose the last set. Dowel from the bottom down or you won't be a happy chappie after the first board goes on.

Doing it before you fix them is a sight easier. Then they just need treating every few years. Creosoting means that you will never be able to paint them or perhaps use any other treatment. Cuprinol or some such is the best.
For future reference: If you orer the boards from a timber mill you can specify what thickness and width you want and get it treated too.
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