Silicone lubricant

I've recently installed a 4 fold shower screen from B&Q and the last job on the instructions is to squeeze silicone lubricant between the hinges. Unfortunately it looks like I accidently threw away the small sachet they supplied so I need to source some more. Anyone got any ideas of where I may get some of this. (It looks like clear silicone sealent but I'm guessing doesn't set)
Cheers
Jim
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JimM wrote:

Plumbers merchant/B&Q/Screwfix (pluming section).
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JimM wrote:

CPC do it in tubes, see - http://tinyurl.com/gpj6
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Cheers,

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Hi Jim,
A smear of ordinary cooking oil does the same job. (extra virgin olive oil if you really want to be posh) :-))
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BigWallop wrote:

That is really bad advice I'm afraid. Cooking oil won't last very long, will go rancid, and may or may not attack the rubber (depending on the type of rubber).
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Because the moisture evaporates from vegetable oils it goes greasy and repels water. It remains in this state for many years. It worked when they built the Pyramids, why can't it work today ? :-))
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Hi Jim.
A drop of engine oil would do the job just as well.
Regards, NT
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Fully synthetic oil, as it will last far longer.
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JimM wrote:

Having just fitted a similar unit, I would suggest that you put some silicone grease in from the outside as well - I need to find the scahet and do that as one of mine leaks about 1 drop per shower (possibly because I've got it mounted so that it's screwed to the wall then immediately turns 90 when in use.
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Hello,
Try your local branch of Anne Summers, they appear to sell a whole range of similar products. God knows what they use it for! Definitely silicone polish.

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wrote:

No. now that you do _not_ want !
Silicone grease is a translucent white, like uncured silicone mastic. Heat transfer compound is bright opaque white.
Both are unpleasant and tend to get everywhere. I usually give my silicone grease away if the tube starts to leak, because I won;t have one in the workshop. It's disaster for any finishing or paint work you do.
But it's not a patch on heat transfer compound for "travelling" and staining. You'll not clean it out either. It's almost as bad as a turmeric curry for permanently staining things you don't want it to.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

Siloicone grease IS a heat transfer compound.
However the one you ar thinking of is loaded with something else, and is not suitable.
Both are avaialable.

haha.
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You're both wrong.
Silicone grease is a clear-ish grease that once you've got it on something is near impossible to remove. It is a good insulating lubricant but is also a good heat transfer material for putting under power transistirs.
Aluminium oxide paste is white and whilst a good heat transfer medium is not a good insulator - not as good as silicone grease anyway.
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wrote:

rswww.com or probably Maplin too. You want the grease, not oil.
For a silicone oil, DOT 5 brake fluid (not DOT 5.1) is a silicone. Much cheaper than Anne Summers too, if you're trying to keep a shine on your rubberwear.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

Is this the voice of experience? :-)
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On Sun, 13 Jul 2003 01:44:32 +0000, parish <parish_AT_ntlworld.com> wrote:

I wouldn't be seen dead in Anne Summers.
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I should hope not, it's for live people! Regards Capitol Andy Dingley wrote in message ...

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<groans loudly> I really, really have led a too sheltered life... I must have read the last few threads a dozen times before the penny dropped. Thanks for making a happy man very old, Richard.
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