Replacement picture tube out of warranty?

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Your eyes may be side by side but they produce a single 3D circular image. ( Unless you are pissed out of your mind and have double vision)

Unfortunatly only ~10% of images are panoramic most are portrait, unless you are a seagull which require a widescreen view as viewing the horizon seems to the be all and end all of their exiatance.

I think u r the troll, the movie of 911 will look great in WS, you will have to film it from 20 miles away to get both towers in.
Images on average are of a random shape so round, like our eyes vision is best.

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On Wed, 31 Dec 2003 02:49:51 -0000, "half_pint"

No they don't. The produce a wide angle view, which modern widescreen TVs still can't achieve but at least they come closer to a natural view than the old 4:3 sets.

We naturally have a panoramic view on ther world - regardless of what we are looking at.

But your vision is NOT round - that is the part you keep getting wrong.

--
Bob.

Education would be your best defense, at the moment you are totally
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Bob Brenchley. wrote:

Completely wrong. Prove it. You can't

Wrong.
-- --------------- regards half_pint
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On Tue, 30 Dec 2003 23:16:33 -0000, "half_pint"

You have been told no - by lots of people.

But "large" and "portable" do not equate. If you want a portable then you have a portable - a 16/17" Widescreen is only a couple of pounds heavier than a normal 14".

I will forgive you, this time, for being stupid.

--
Bob.

Light travels faster than sound. This is why you appear bright until
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Bob Brenchley. wrote:

Yes people who don't have a clue and no evidence to support them.

Nobody sells em - slight problem

You are wrong EOS.

Its worked ok the last 5 years and I am not changing it.
-- --------------- regards half_pint
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wrote:

16/9 =1.8 GR = 1.618

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Are widescreen TVs closer to 625 or 415 lines?
I have a 625 line "old fashioned" tv, and when watching stuff in W/S (which I prefer for movies), there must be a whole lot of lines which are "black" - but I have never seen figures as to what the number of lines on a W/S TV actually is.
So... how many lines on a W/S TV?
Thanks
Noz
--
Email nozza underscore wales at yahoo co uk

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Nozza wrote:

I believe there are 625 but it is hard to get any real info, there doesn't seem to be any available. the mugs who buy WS TV's would buy anything. I also see some references to 480 lines but these may be from USA or other countries sites. The only thing which is clear is that the whole thing is a mess. Black bars all over the place - yuck. 4:3 is best, you can pan and scan a WS movie with excellent results. You cannot however pan and scan a 4:3 picture with a WS apperture. I have no doubt that the slitty eyed Japs are behind it all (Sony).
When the switch to digital TV takes place I will stop watching TV and use the license money to pay for a fast broadband connection. It seems like the only solution to this fiasco. TV will be so f*cked up by then it wont be worth watching. They can shove their WS TV's up their arses (it should be a good fit). I have no intension of becoming a WS TV victim. Its not WideScreen its WankerScreen. WSTV = WankerScreen.TechnoVictim.

-- --------------- regards half_pint
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On Wed, 31 Dec 2003 23:34:21 +0000, Nozza

No, widescreen TVs are the same 625 line standard as old fashioned 4:3 sets.
--
Bob.

Seen on a sign in the window of a restaurant: "Life is short, start
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On Fri, 26 Dec 2003 15:33:39 -0000, "half_pint"

Never know it in this life. Please hurry forward to the next life where you may have a brains and stand a chance of being right for once.
--
Bob.

The difference between ordinary stupid and extraordinary stupid can be
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wrote:

LOL the irony!!!!

-- --------------- regards half_pint

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have a look at:
it is up ro you to show that the fault was inherent at time of purchase, you can persue a claim against the retailer up to 6 years after purchase - 6 years is an absolute limit and does not apply to all goods as a matter of course
http://www.tradingstandards.gov.uk/cgi-bin/calitem.cgi?fileV0054-1111.txt http://www.dti.gov.uk/ccp/topics1/facts/salegoodsact.htm http://www.dti.gov.uk/ccp/topics1/saleandsupply.htm
there is a good posting at:
http://www.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&safe=off&frame=right&rnum &thl4049202,993991500,993912497,993982043,993968990,993964144,99 3893351,993881376,993859354,993879828,993859643,993374340&seekm=brjuh9%24416 kb%241%40ID-176063.news.uni-berlin.de#link16
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The sites you list (which are pretty good btw, thanks) kinda differ from that description though. There doesn't seem to be any mention of the fault being inherent when the item is bought. What does seem to be the case is the concept of a "resonable period" which would differ depending on the item. Some examples of this are mentioned in the sites, e.g. a car oil filter would be around a year, a new battery could discharge on-the-shelf in six months. The upper limit, 6 years from purchase in England, 5 years from fault discovery in Scotland (me) only applies to what you can actually bring a civil court case up for. Obviously, if you can't do that, then the shop really doesn't have to do anything.
For an expensive TV, the consensus seems to be that 3.5 years is "unreasonable". Hopefully the store will see it that way!
Fraser.
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That's not a tube fault. The line driver or frame flyback is up the spout. Failures of the tube itself are very rare - it's always the high voltage control circuits that tend to have problems.

Yes but of the electronics as noted.

Toshiba are usually quite reasonable which may make your retailer more willing to help. As others have noted you need to take it to the retailer. They may end up wanting you to pay labour and parts are free - it all depends in the end how much you are willing to pay to minimise your aggravation, although you shouldn't have to pay anything.
email me with the TV model and I'll ask a friend who does this sort of thing what the cost to the retailer would be - may be handy to know.

--
79.84% of all statistics are made up on the spot.
The other 42% are made up later on.
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It most likely is I'm afraid. A fault in the drive electronics would result in a permanent failure. The OP says the fault is intermittent.
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On Thu, 25 Dec 2003 09:44:42 +0000, Mike Tomlinson

I'd beg to disagree. I've had three faults similar to those described all of which have been traced to blown FET's or similar in the drive electronics.
--
79.84% of all statistics are made up on the spot.
The other 42% are made up later on.
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Hope the weird posting doesn't confuse anyone, pulling all the techy stuff into one place:

What Andy said. :-) That's exactly what the guy at the repair shop said, and they are waiting for me to get back to them on what the retailer/manufacturer say.
The TV has always had a green tint as well, as if the bias was way off. Tried using the service menu once to bring it down, but there was no change, so I set it back to it's original setting. Don't know if that's related, but worth a mention.

Cool, that would be handy! It's a Toshiba 32W8DB.
Cheers,
Fraser.
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Fraser wrote:

It sounds like a heater to cathode short in the green gun. This can usually be worked around by isolating the heaters from ground. I've done it many times in other TVs with good results. If you can't get a new CRT for a reasonable price someone may be able to try this.
--
Andy Cuffe
snipped-for-privacy@psu.edu
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Where we are located, we are under similar law to that of the UK. The warranty has to comply to the purchase agreement contract. TV's without an extended warranty are sold with a one year contract. You can optionally purchase more time.
If the tube goes one day after the warranty, the manufacture is legally not obliged to change it, or service the set. I tell people that for the little more than the cost of the TV set, it is best to buy the extended warranty. Servicing a TV set can be expensive. The few extra dollars for the extended warranty can be well worth the investment.
I have heard some people saying that the dealers make a lot of money on these warranties. Actually this is not very true. The mark-up on all these products is not very great. If the set turns out to be a lemon, the manufacture will end up paying the cost of service, and maybe even the exchange the set for a new one.
--

Greetings,

Jerry Greenberg GLG Technologies GLG
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wrote:

I have no idea what Canada does, but in this respect it is not similar to the UK. The manufacturer and the retailer can provision whatever kind of warranty that they like, but it is only a convenience.

In the UK the retailer may be, and a test of reasonableness, accounting for the type of goods and the price is considered by the court if the customer wishes to pursue it.
Retailers and manufacturers do quite well out of customer's ignorance of the law and a natural British reticence to complain.

I'll bet.

What a surprise.

A few extra dollars!? In the UK, extended warranties can be 20-25% of the new price of a set.

Here they do. The retailers push them like hell to boost their margins. In reality, all that is achieved is the customer not having to argue their statutory rights with the retailer. Even then, there is typically no guaranteed time to repair.

Yeah, right.

As indeed they should do. However, here that is not the customer's issue it's the retailer's.
.andy
To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
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