Removing limescale from chrome taps

What's the best way to remove encrusted limescale from old chrome bath taps? Having a quick google, I couldn't really find any good answers!
There must be a way.....?
Cheers
Steve
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taps?
I get a small piece of kitchen towel soaked in vinegar wrapped around the scaled area. Leave over night and then brush with toothbrush or scrape with finger nail. If the scale is very heavy this may need to be repeated several times.
AndyP
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Oldskoolskater wrote:

If you're doing them in situ - soak a rag in vinegar, and wrap around the tap, then wrap cling film over the rag. Leave in place overnight, scrub with old toothbrush, repeat if necessary. If they aren't installed, put them in a container, cover with straight vinegar, cover, leave overnight, etc.
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taps?
Citric acid is a good deal stronger and available at most chemists.
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stuart noble wrote:

Yes. But I prefer to start with something I already have, and only move up to stronger, purpose-bought stuff, if my first attempt doesn't work.
Sheila
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Oldskoolskater wrote:

KilRock-K or Gel_Kilrock if on enamel bath
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Be very careful about getting descaling agents onto enamel surfaces, or you can discover to your cost that they are not as robust as you might have imagined against chemical attack.
--
Andrew Gabriel

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On 8 Oct 2003 07:39:45 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@mailinator.com (Oldskoolskater) wrote:

I was advised that lemon juice can do the business - and from a small experiment I carried out that would seem to be the case.
So if you've got a leftover plastic lemon from pancake day.....
PoP
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PoP wrote:

The water here in north Hampshire is incredibly hard and I have to use Kilrock on the chrome kitchen mixer tap once per month. It does say on the bottle not to use it on/near enamel but to use the gel version instead. I've never used it in a bathroom because the rest of my house runs from a water-softener, a proper ion-exchange one not the magic coil ones :-)
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On Wed, 08 Oct 2003 18:49:51 +0100, PoP
Sir,
I followed your instructions to the letter and wrapped a pancake left over from pancake day on my taps. The cat (or some other piece of wildlife) ate it some time during the seventh night and either died or the pancake was regurgitated onto the floor (the effluvium has legs and the cat is missing so I am not sure which it is). The scale on the taps is still there but there is now a foul odour in the room and tiles have started to peel off the walls.
I really cannot recommend this treatment.
--
Peter Parry.
http://www.wpp.ltd.uk/
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Thanks all for your replies.
The taps are off the bath, so there is no problem with possible enamel damage.
Kilrock? I've not heard of that......Is it widely available? I think I have used Viakal in the past, but it was a long time ago and can't remember how effective it was.
Cheers
Steve
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Oldskoolskater wrote:

Yes it is. I got mine in either Boots or Richard Dyas. I apply it with an old toothbrush. Usually takes only a few minutes.
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Most descallers are sulphamic acid (except those for use on enamel). Cheapest way to buy it is probably a tub of Furnox DS-3 for descaling heating systems. (Actually, it lists several other things you shouldn't use it on, most of which I do without any problems.)
--
Andrew Gabriel

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wrote:

You are taking the p!ss and I claim my five pounds ;)
PoP
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