metallic scourer removing limescale

That metallic pan scourer you can buy that looks like thick shiny wire wool works a treat for getting off limescale from glass vases without scratching up the glass.
But when I tried to use it clean off thick limescale on the bottom of the toilet bowl it leaves a grey kind of mark on the enamel.
Any suggestions for scraping off the limescale without damaging the enamel ? I've tried liquid limescale remover and it does not do the job.
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You need to find a liquid which works. You might want to mix in some detergent too (but never mix in any proprietary cleaners - just some washing up liquid, as it's normally limescale mixed with organic matter. Leave it in there overnight to give it time to act, and then the deposit should easily wipe off with a toilet brush.
Good kettle descalers work (dissolve crystals in warm water before pouring in). Furnox DS-3 works (but may leave the pan stained light blue for a few days afterwards, as the indicator dye in it is quite potent). Again, dissolve in hot water before using. Brick acid (conc Hydrochloric acid from a builder's merchant) is the strongest option (just need a tiny amount), but I wouldn't use it regularly, and make sure it's well flushed from all the pipework afterwards (otherwise it will eventually dissolve cast iron pipes and the mortar in underground pipe joints).
Big warning: Never mix different cleaners, or cleaners and bleach - some combinations quickly give off toxic gasses. Always make sure one cleaner is well flushed from the pan and the pipework after use (can damage some sewer pipework if left there) when you've finished, or when you are going to try another cleaner.
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On Sunday, June 2, 2013 11:22:07 AM UTC+1, jim stone wrote:

Copper scourer. Steel damages most things. But why do it the hard way when you can just pour conc H2SO4 onto it?
NT
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On 02/06/13 14:27, snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

HCl is better IMHO.

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Slightly sideways, is there any chance the toilet is fed *softened* water. One of ours is for various reasons/excuses from the builder's plumber.
Scaling is grey and impervious to conventional lime scale removers.

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On 02/06/13 11:22, jim stone wrote:

use brick acid.
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ol

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WD40 and a plastic scouring pad. Doesn't abrade the finish.
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ol

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this site
You will likely find the enamel (glass) finish on the bowl has been etched by the use of aggressive toilet cleaners. (Eg Harpic and the like) If you leave them on too long it has this effect. If you read the destructions now it recommends flushing the toilet after only a short period of time.
The dark mark is limescale/manganese dioxide (common in many areas) in the pitting/etching. Limescale where I live is almost black due to this.
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On 02/06/2013 11:22, jim stone wrote:

Get rid of the water first. Use a mop with the head wrapped up in a plastic dustbin liner bag as a plunger.
Then use any of the limescale removers - Lidl do a relatively cheap one that works well.
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On Sun, 2 Jun 2013 11:22:07 +0100, "jim stone"

What you have are known as knife marks in the tableware industry. Instructions for removing them here: http://www.ehow.com/how_4495280_remove-flatware-marks-from-dishes.html
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Chris

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On Sun, 2 Jun 2013 11:22:07 +0100, jim stone wrote:

The thick, shiny wire wool is stainless steel; it is so-called "free-cutting". As most of us in here know, st. st. ain't free-cutting. To make it so, lead is included to 'lubricate' the cutter. Lead, strangely, 'writes' to glaze especially, as already mentioned, if there's damage from chemicals and abrasion.
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On 02/06/2013 21:42, PeterC wrote:

Have you got anything to back up your assertion that such pan scrubs contain lead? It is a bit surprising to me if something that is intended for use directly on surfaces used for food preparation would include lead.
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wool

ching

the

amel ?

lead

.
I can't believe there's lead in a pan scrubber either.
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On Sun, 02 Jun 2013 22:10:15 +0100, polygonum wrote:

No - sorry. Years ago, before such things were in shops, I saw somewhere in some blurb about the free-cutting st. st. from which the thing was made. Looked it up (in a book!) and found out about the lead. Could well be different now, of course.
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On 03/06/2013 08:52, PeterC wrote:

Thanks for explaining - I understand why your post now. :-)
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Rod

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