Programmable thermostats

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Firstly I just want to say how interesting this group is, I am learning loads, most of which I hope I will never need to use ;o) thanks to all the pro's who are willing to take the time to help novices like me.
Now ......where were we........................... I would like to have a programmable thermostat installed instead of my bog standard room stat. Firstly, as my boiler has a timer attached to it I presume I will have to get this disconnected?
Does anyone have any recommendations? I would like one that I can put in different programmes for each day and probably a couple of temperature changes a day (am I asking too much?)
Also any of you lovely plumbers live anywhere near Eastbourne (or know of a good CH person around here?) I have a few things I need doing!
Angela
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Yes.
Honeywell CM67 should save you a lot of money in running costs as it optimises the start time (delays the start to cut fuel costs) and is easy to use.

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IMM wrote:

Or my lazy way, set it to always on. You'll need the rest of it to still control the hot water of course.

Thats the one I went for. Brilliant, and in wireless version, although not cheap, can save a lot of hassle getting wiring through to hardwired model.
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Best remove it and install a single stage clock. These are cheap and then no confusion.

The Land & Steafa equiv is just as good, if not better. Landis equipment always has user friendly interfaces.
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Best, as in more expensive and unnecessary? If it is single channel anyway, there is no confusion if it then runs only the hot water. If it is twin channel, then it can be left entirely as it is anyway as a master switch.
Christian.
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Not unnecessary. These are cheap and make matters simple.
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It's actually a condenser boiler so no timer needed for the hot water - always on sounds by far the best bet!
Angela
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I think are confusing condensing and combi. It may be both.
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It sounds like it!
(You meant combi, by the way, not condensing).
Christian.
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message

Just testing you! *blush*
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Can I just put the new thermostat where the old one is or does it need additional wiring?
Sorry if that as dumb question ;o)
Angela
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It just replaces the old thermostat and run on batteries. Just remove the old timer, as then it will be surplus and probably look naff.
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Angela wrote:

YES, In fact ot needs less wires. It will not need the neutral connection because as IMM said, they run on battery(s). Its a simple job, however, Sods law says that it will be smaller/different shape to your old one so you'll have to re-decorate the wall afterwards :-) Then that wall won't match the rest so you'll redo the whole room getting paint on the carpet....
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More nonsense from our resident 'expert'.
The 'timer' will also permit the selection of hot water only etc.
I have a normal fairly basic timer that gives the usual once, twice and continuous which I use in conjuction with programable thermostat. However, if going out for the day etc it's much easier to switch the timer to twice than to mess with the thermostat. The programable stat is great when the house is occupied all day, but there's no point in running the heating when it's empty.
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It is also good for turning off the system totally. I have two programmable thermostats, one for upstairs and one for downstairs. (There may be a couple more zones in the future, too). I can turn the entire CH side off by jiggling the programmer. I could also prevent wayward teenagers setting their rooms to 30C in the middle of the night too, by using the timer as a master switch, which will override the programmable thermostat.
Christian.
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Christian McArdle wrote:

One of the most used facilities on my CM67 is the party button - not for its intended use, but when you're going out for a bit you can press it and (say) select 3 hours at 15C. At the end of this period it reverts to the normal program and you come home to a warm house.
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There I was about to start a new thread, when I spotted this active topic.
I have a Horstmann Centaurstat7 which I bought from Screwfix. I have wired my heating so that is always on and the feed to the thermostat is always live. So the stat has total control of the heating system.
It has 4 periods and rather than weekdays and weekends which many controllers have it has work days and non workdays. This is a great feature as my wife works part time therefore need the house to be warm some of the weekdays. So far so good...
However in practice it is not so good. It is far too sensitive, meaning that the system frequently gets switched on (ie cold starts) for 5 minutes or so then switches off. My boiler is fairly old, so takes a while to heat up its cast iron cylinder, so it scarcely starts heating the water sometimes, then it switches off! I shudder to think how innefficient this is and need to do something about it quickly.
I must say I am suprised really - I thought Horstmann was a good make. Has anyone else:- - got one of these? - noticed similar behaviour? - come up with any solutions? - come across any optimisations/installers settings like those mentioned for the Honeywell CM67 previously in this thread?
I'd rather not go to the expense of replacing the controller. If I do would have to make sure it has the workday/non-workday feature explained above rather than straight weekday/weekend settings as many controllers do.
Thanks in anticipation
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Flat Eric wrote:

I don't know this model but I noticed in a simple Landis programable thermostat there is a small switch inside which is something to do with short cycling. Maybe yours has something similar.
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On Fri, 31 Oct 2003 13:41:03 +0000, BillR wrote:

As frequent readers of uk.d-i-y know this is a control that I use and (I confess) rather like. I have one in my own home and have fitted one with just about every heating system I have done substantial work on.
The fact that you have the thermostat clicking off after short while means either the house was very nearly warm enough already or you have a bad position for it. Too near to a source of heat or sunlight?
I have also had no complaints from customers about the heating not coming on or remaining on long enough.
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Thanks for that Ed. I infer that you have substantial experience in matters CH, so its reassuring atleast that the Centaurstat has your seal of approval.
In repsonse to your comments, this is what I have tried so far: 1] the thermostat is in the hall about 4ft from a rad on the opposite wall. Unfortunately I don't have a TRV on this rad, but I have turned the valve right down, so its very nearly off. This rad is logically near the boiler - one of the first on the flow side and last on the return side, so I was concerned intially that the flow was choosing the path of least resistance, through this rad and the hall reaching temp b4 the rest of the house. But this hasn't made any difference. Very often its obvious the boiler just hasn't got up to temperature, by feeling the flow pipe out of the boiler just after it has switched off. 2] removed the 'stat cover from the base and covered the vent holes with cellotape, to try to make it less responsive - no change here either.
The external door into the hall is south facing, but is about 15ft away from the 'stat, so I don't see direct/indirect heat from the sun being a problem.
The only other thing occuring to me as I write is that the 'stat is located on single-skin wooden panelling alongside the staircase. On the other side of this are steps down to the basement. There could be 2 issues here: temperature fluctuations conducting through the wood - perhaps unlikely as wood by nature is relatively insulating. The more likley cause is small draughts coming into the back of the 'stat. The wire to the stat disappears through a hole the panneling down into the basement, where the boiler is. At the moment the basement is otherwise unheated and there is permanent fresh-air ventilation. As I write I am unsure whether that hole is totally air-tight... Could have hit the jackpot - will check it out when I get home tonight...
The only other thing I had thought of doing - a nasty low-tech effort - would be putting a bit of fibre-glass lagging inside the 'stat, again to try and make it less responsive.
Anyway - I'll check that hole tonight and post back if I've cracked it
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