Plastering a wooden building

I've got a shed going up next week, and I intend to insulate most of the inside (a single skin partition will seperate out the other section)
Now, the entire structure will be of dip treated 2x3 framing with 22mm cladding on top (excused the mixed metrics!), on the inside of which I'll be putting a insulating polystyrene layer topped off with plasterboard and then a layer of plaster.
The entire building will be 18'x10' with a 13'x10' room being insulated.
My main concern at the moment is how the plasterboard will stand up to the expansion and contraction of the wood?
Now, my questions.
1) is this the right way to go? 2) How should I attach the plasterboard to the framing? 3) Would 75mm polystyrene be about right/too much/too little? 4) How should I run a lighting ring given the PVC/polystyrene issues?
Can you reply to the group please, I don't read the email address provided above!
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S Casey wrote:

Not too badly. My whole house is made this way, and its more flexure and the initial shrinkage of the wall that has proved the problem. Tape the joints well before skimming, and don't be tempted to try and use all the plasterboard scraps. Board is cheap, making good splits later is not.

Yes, tho I would use Celotex. not poloystyrene, for better fire safety in terms of flammability and noxoious fumes. Use fool backed plasterboard with polystyrene, to form vapour barrier.

Nail it on carefully with big headed clouts. I have had zero success with 'plasterboard screws' - they rip the top surface and the plasterboard comes loose. YMMV

As much as possible. 75MM celotex even better.

Dont use polystyrene, use celotex. Or Rockwool. Its as good as polystrene.
Tip. Run cables early, and decide where sockets etc are to go, mark on studs.
Its probably better to have cables at the back behind insulation, wheer they won't get nailed as you put up plasterboard.
Put up insulation. and if using celotex use the foil tape to seal. Bring sires top teh front through cutouts, if you intend to use drywall sockets or put in noggins to take steel boxes. Insyall boxes and coil up cables inside.
NOW GET A FOAM GUN AND SEAL UP EVEYTHING to draught proof COMPLETELY. Wish I had.
nail up plasterboard.
Make cutouts for wires and pull through. Fit drywall sockets if using.
tape joimnts with scriom, Skim and decorate
Install sockets.

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The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Out of interest, how is your house clad? Brick? Timber?
--
Grunff


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Grunff wrote:

Totally timber, clad in marine ply, paper, air gap/battens, metal lathe and render, in that order.
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Sounds very nice. Only things I would suggest are:
1. Use 50mm of celotex. For a shed, 75mm would be overkill. This enables you to leave a 25mm ventilation gap between the outside skin and the plasterboard. 75mm would have the slight advantage of allowing cross layed boards to reduce cold bridging through the studs (and possible condensation effects), but for a shed, I doubt it is really necessary. It will be as warm and comfortable as a house which ever you do.
2. Don't bother with the plaster skim. Just tape and fill taper edge boards.
3. Insulate the whole lot and then separate out the partition. Insulate the partition wall if you want a temperature difference across the rooms. This gives you the flexibility to remove the partition in the future to get a bigger room. It also helps to ensure that the uninsulated end doesn't rot before the rest of the building.
Christian.
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Christian McArdle wrote:

Is there a recommended product for doing this, or will any of the standard fillers do?
Bert http://www.bertcoules.co.uk
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It will be called something like "Plasterboard Jointing Filler" or such like. There are many brands. You need to tape it first using plasterboard jointing tape. Otherwise there WILL be cracks. Don't forget to joint the top of the boards to the ceiling, too.
Christian.
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Easi-Fill is a good jointing filler and easy to rub down..... IMHO Nick
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