Installing Your Own Double Glazing

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There are websites where someone can purchase double glazing. You take the measurements, send them on and they despatch the windows.
You then install the windows yourself, with a friend or two for help!
I was wondering if anyone here has ever installed their own double glazing? If so, how did you get on doing so, and what experience did you have before doing so?
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from what I remember - in fact the hardest part of the job by a long way was getting the old (metal!) frames out with the minimum of disruption to the surroundings. - don't forget that if you diy you need building regs approval once you've finished these days.
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Thanks! I didn't know you need building regs approval if you install them yourself. Do they have a look *before* all the plasterwork is done so they can see in properly, or do they come out after the plastering and everything is completed?
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On 24 Jan 2004 04:21:55 -0800, a particular chimpanzee named snipped-for-privacy@postmaster.co.uk (SuzySue) randomly hit the keyboard and produced:

Often before the work starts and after. Before: to check that you aren't adversely affecting any means of escape, ventilation and/or structure. After: to check that what went in was what you said was going in. (http://www.bathnes.gov.uk/buildingcontrol/ReplacementWindows.htm)
--
Hugo Nebula
"The fact that no-one on the internet wants a piece of this
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(SuzySue) randomly hit the keyboard and

Basically you submit your plans to them, and they will then advise you at want point(s) they want to inspect. IME they are normally very happy to talk to you informally before you submit, and point you in the right direction; they are pretty helpful even to clueless people like me, if you are showing you are doing your best to comply with the rules etc and need info. (Where they may get stroppy is when you start doing stuff behind their back or without their knowledge. That's when you find yourself having to re-expose the foundations of your new build for inspection (and that's not IME!)
David
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I've installed a couple of windows. It's not a difficult task.
Basically.
Remove old window - remove glass with a hammer, saw through the frame in a few places, prise out of opening.
Put new frame in hole, pack it out with scraps of wood etc. to hold it in place, ensuring it is in square. Drill through frame into brickwork. Insert frame fixings to hold frame. Seal with expanding foam, sealant etc.
Put in glazing (if we are talking about UPVC this is easy enough)
It's not a task really for a novice dIY-er IMO, but someone with a modicum of experience should manage ok.
I'd be wary of buying mailorder, sight unseen. The quality of UPVC (and wood for that matter) windows varies greatly. I'd look out for a local place that does 'fit your own) most places should have factories doing this,.
--
Chris French, Leeds

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I fitted a window and patio doors from Screwfix. Being stock sizes, I had to modify the wall openings somewhat - although they were replacing relatively modern units. Suppose it would have been easier with custom made units, but the couple of quotes I got suggested rather more expensive. The actual fitting was pretty straightforward with reasonable instructions provided, and the resulting job is rather better than many of the pro ones I've seen - mainly due to more careful finishing of the internal decorations which is probably the major part of the job.
--
*Proofread carefully to see if you any words out or mispeld something *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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snipped-for-privacy@postmaster.co.uk (SuzySue) wrote in message

About 20 years ago, with much help from a much more competent diyer, so I may have forgotten much.
1. (Obviously) measurement is crucial -- especially considering 2.
2. We appeared to be able to install them with much less disruption to the surrounds than we observed in the work of most 'professionals', i.e. almost a matter of ripping out the old (wooden) ones and slotting in the new into the space vacated. Very little plastering required -- IMHO important for diy. That foam stuff (that hardens) (name?) was a godsend.
Best regards,
Jon C.
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I've double glazed 2 houses so far. My tips are:
If you're dealing with large panes then get one or two of those glass suction cups (especially if you're working above the ground floor!) to hold the glass as you position it in.
When fitting the glass into an openable frame make sure the frame is closed and totally square because without glass in them they shift out of square easily.
If you're not too hot on using a silicone gun then practice a little or use masking tape - getting excess silicone off the frame may be easy but not off brick! You can also use plastic beading to cover up large gaps (or dodgy silicone work!)
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SuzySue wrote:

When we got ours, we were going to DIY. But the (very nice) glasing company quoted 350 to fit all 8 windows. It took 4 of them just under a day to do it, all for 350. They even cleaned up afterwards, and fixed any render that fell off on the outside.
At that price, I would've been mad to do it myself.
--
Grunff

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Amazing price for that lot. Quality presumably ok? (How does one tell how good the quality anyway I wonder). Oh - and who are they :-)
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Mike wrote:

You know when you watch someone do something, and it becomes obvious to you that they have been doing the same thing day after day for years? That's what it was like. They were pros in the truest sense of the word.
The new frames went in with between 6 and 10 fixings per frame (depending on size), and large amounts of foam. Very nicely done.
I've mentioned them before, they are Vector Windows in Holsworthy (Devon). They only really cover Devon/Cornwall.
--
Grunff

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Mike,
I think that's just for fixing them. 8-)
They were billing their time at about 11/hour. wages probably 6 or 7. So definitely do-able.
DG
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derek wrote:

Yes, it was - sorry, I did say "quoted 350 to fit all 8 windows", not "to supply and fit".
The windows themselves were an additional ~1300, also extremely good value.
--
Grunff

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There was a thread on this about six days ago ...
Mary
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Also, choose internal glazing. If the windows are on the first floor, it saves some one from climbing up a ladder with a mate, trying to get the double glazing unit into the frame. Much easier from the comfort of the room that is getting the new window. Also, the ground floor glazing can't be removed from the outside by the local scallies.
Dave
Who did all his own windows.
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I though that under the new regs, internally glazed was compulsory BICBW?
tim

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Neither can externally glazed windows done in last few years -- the glazing units are held in place by window tapes and can't be removed from the outside.
Internally glazed windows have larger section PVC, which most people find rather distasteful. In the case of windows with openers, the PVC sections have to be much bigger, making the window area much smaller.
--
Andrew Gabriel

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snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote in message writes:

Hi All,
Just finished this job on my house. 10 windows, new front door and new french doors.
I chose to install PVC everything and probably saved 2k+ over getting a firm in to do the work. I know some people question the aesthetics but I like 'em.
I was advised by an ex-window installer to buy good quality units and ignore the cheap stuff. I bought all my windows from a fensa registered company - that way I knew that I was doing everything to the correct standard. I still read the regs thought just to be on the safe side.
I had to apply to my local council for permission (cost of 100+VAT!!). One visit by them before I fitted the windows and one after. Very straight forward and I got the precious certificate of approval quite easily.
Overall it wasn't as difficult a job as I though it would be.
Martin.
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writes:

Thanks for that info Andrew. Its been a few years since I did mine, but when the first window fails in the upstairs, I will elect to remove the frame and fit internal glazing. Reason being, I'm 58 this year and I don't fancy balancing on a ladder again while I fit an external glazing unit :-((((
As to the larger section of PVC frame, I can stand that, as the windows are not that small to have much effect on this aspect.
Dave
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