How to seal bottom of roller shutter garage door?

Evenin' all,
Now that I've sorted out the roof of the barn sized garage I was somewhat dismayed this morning to find pools of water inside, in which, of course, were standing bags of cement, sawn timber ready to be worked on further, and wooden tool boxes ..
What seems to have happened is that wind blew the water that gathers just outside the door inside. Originally the garage was even longer so the concrete apron outside isn't angled to allow drainage.
Having restacked all the wood, cleaned up the mess (and by the way ~ the Numatic George excelled itself [1]), and reorganised things a bit I'm wondering how best to stop more water coming in this route. For now I've put a length of split hose pipe along the bottom of the roller shutter - seems to have made contact all along the length (9 feet) - but then - I thought the shutter itself was pretty well aligned - certainly wasn't expecting a couple of gallons of water to come in overnight through the very small gaps..
TIA
[1] How come we haven't had a vacuum cleaner war here for a while?
Barley Twist (Please put out the cats to reply direct)
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i have seen shutter doors with seals along the bottom so i assume they are available
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I had this problem on my door last year. Eventually, I gave up trying to seal it and ground a channel beneath the door edge which allowed the rain to run away to outside.
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[15 lines snipped]

When we had the drive relaid, I had a gutter installed outside the doors. That finally solved the problem...
--
"The road to Paradise is through Intercourse."
The uk.transport FAQ; http://www.huge.org.uk/transport/FAQ.html
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On 2 Nov 2003 19:49:55 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@ukmisc.org.uk (Huge) wrote:

But that will only work if the levels are suitable.
I imagine from his descruption the water was blown under the door. Probably running off the face of the door and then being blown under.
The easy answer is to install a batten , (steel angle ? ) inside the door to stop the weter ingress. Then some means of disposing of the water will have to be found.
The problem with this is it wull form a slight obstruction to wheeled objects though 1/2" angle should suit unless he is living on the side of Mount Arrarat.(Sp?)
I suppose he could try raising the floor level to form this lip.
Paul Mc Cann
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On Sun, 02 Nov 2003 17:29:20 +0000, Barley Twist wrote:

Sorted the up and over garage door here by fixing a brush strip along the bottom edge and strips of old industrial type carpet up the frame to the position of the door pivot when closed. The bottom edge does come up against a 1" step up though. Still get a bit of powder snow getting in at the top of the carpet strips but nothing like as much. Powder snow will get through a pinhole... Note the sides, are they reasonably well draft proofed? Edge of door loosely in a channel will allow wind driven rain past.
Which way have you mounted the split hose? Round side down, two edges down or one edge down. I think I'd try the two edges down approach first. If that fails and well in might against a flat surface, you probably need to get rid of the flat surfce and create some form of up at the point where the shutter comes down.
Cutting a channel would work provided you cut it with a fall and somewhere for the water to drain, otherwise it'll just fill up and blow under. The fall will mean a gap at the lower end but a brush or soft "rubber" seal should cope with that. Another ploy put in a small rise just to the rear of the door. Seal it with silicone or similar to the floor so water can't get under it. Then have something on the door that fits snugly to the ridge or the floor immediatly in front of it.
| | +---+| | | |+S--+ -----+---+------
To avoid to much of trip hazard you can get rounded rubber infilled strips. If the bottom of the shutter is smooth and uniform enough you might get away with it just ressting on such a rubber strip but any water that does get past will flow in, not sure of the durabilty of the rubber I've seen some in a pretty bad or if you can get it in 9' lenghts.
With the above if anything does get past the seal it still has to go uphill to get in and hopefully without anything like the exterior wind assistance.
--
Cheers snipped-for-privacy@howhill.com
Dave. pam is missing e-mail
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On Sun, 02 Nov 2003 17:29:20 +0000, Barley Twist

I've fixed this just with brush strip on the door. Dead easy to do, no obstructions on the floor, and it stops wind-blown rain.
If you have a downward slope towards the door though, you'll want something more definite.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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