Hedge trimmers

My elderly, cheap, B&D ones have expired.
Any recommendations for a replacement?
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Huge wrote:

I've always had good service from Bosch Hedge trimmers
Bob
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Huge wrote:

I replaced my B&D trimmer recently with a Viking (Stihl). No comparison - the Viking is superb. The B&D (one of 3 or 4 over the years) was .. well .. cheap and didn't last very long - ended up just ripping the hedge rather than cutting it.
Warning - Viking are *not* cheap :-(
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Troy wrote:

I got a petrol powered stihl with a long arm. I used it once - heavy as hell, but did the job fabulously.
Then it got ripped off.
450 squids roughly.
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

I replaced my noisy and unreliable B&D with a Bosch model a few years ago - and have been very happy with it.
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This is very good sale price just now goto Argos website and have a look.
Argos code :721/5520 Black and Decker GT25 Electric Hedge Trimmer.
Was 34.75 NOW 16.49
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wrote:

I looked but it says:- Black and Decker GT25 Electric Hedge Trimmer. Was 34.75 721/5520 28.68
Geo
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

You've got it about right - although there's little point in matching blade length to hedge width - 'cos you'll also want to cut the vertical sides!
In general, the longer the blade, the faster the operation - but that does increase the weight and the amount of effort required. My hedges are very wide - far wider than the longest blade available - so blade length determines whether or not I can reach the far side of the hedge when holding the machine at arms length.
Machines which will cut thicker twigs have much bigger notches in the blades, and need more powerful motors - again increasing the weight and cost - so it's horses for courses. Define what it is you want to achieve, and buy a suitable machine. None of them will realistically cut anything more than about 15mm - whatever they claim! For anything bigger than that, you need loppers (or a saw).
I have no experience of cordless trimmers - but wouldn't expect them to be able to tackle anything other than thin twigs on smallish hedges.
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<snip>
Actually, I'd say the key difference was petrol or electric. Petrol is more powerful, noisier, heavier than electric. But they will cut much thicker stuff and are probably faster. Neither is 'better' - it all depends on the job and other criteria you are using to choose a machine.
But a key question for the OP is what type of hedge and how big/long is it - this is a key question in choosing a machine.

I've got a cordless trimmer. (42 cm I think) I use it for trimming the topoiaried Yews in the garden and a few other shrubs, for which it performs well, it will deal with reasonably sized stuff, and I prefer it to the old mains one I had. As ever, it depends on what you need
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Chris French


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While it is possibly true in a general sense that "Petrol is more powerful" it's no longer always true.
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On Sun, 30 Aug 2009 16:33:53 +0100, chris French wrote:

Hmm, that sums up what I was going to type :-) I do find petrol trimmers get a bit heavy when doing the tops of hedges - mainly because of the way I have to stand to reach, I suppose. For the sides that's not an issue, nor is it for smaller hedges I suspect (ours is about 7' tall and a similar width)
If in doubt, get a heavy-duty petrol one *and* a lightweight electric...
cheers
Jules
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Jules wrote:

also consider on on a pole, as then you can cut tall hedges (within reason) without perching precariously on steps!
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I'd question if petrol is more powerful. Electric hedge trimmers seem to mostly range from 400W to 650W. If there was a need for any more power, that's still way below what could be drawn from a 13A outlet and more powerful ones could be built, so the lack of them would point to there not being a requirement for more power.
The more significant difference is going to be if you have suitable access to a socket outlet where you need to use the tool.

TBH, I suspect sharp verses blunt blades is going to be far more important than the power of the motor.
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There is another fundamental difference other than petrol/electric: double or single edge cutting.
I have only used an AEG trimmer which is *double* cut. Nice in that you can trim upwards with either hand, however, maintaining the scissor action relies on the unused edge holding the cutting edges close together. IMO this leads to excessive blade wear. The single cut versions are stronger and appear to give a cleaner cut.
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On Mon, 31 Aug 2009 09:01:55 +0000, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

And how well lubricated they are. Our electric one stalled on me a couple of weeks ago and I took the blade assembly apart - all the grease had gone from the surfaces, and in some spots moisture was getting in and starting to rust the surfaces. I don't believe that "dismantle the whole lot" is in any maintenance schedule in the manual, but I don't think the trimmer's more than a few years old (it was given to us by a neighbour who decided we had more deserving hedges than he :-)
Cleaned the whole lot, sanded, cleaned agin, re-greased and it's all running happily again. Blade endges still seemed good, so I left those well alone.
cheers
Jules
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Agreed - particularly when used for trimming conifer hedging. Following the advice of a local landscape contractor I always squirt WD40 (yes it does actually work in this particular case), on the cutter bars before and after and, when doing the annual conifer hedge cut, once during the work.
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My new Stihl says you should spray the blades with a resin solvent. (WD40 might do that.) It doesn't say any lubrication of the blades is required, although it does require lubrication of the gearbox every 25 hours use.
My old B&D says you should oil the blades. Since I was usually outside just next to the car, I used to pull out the dipstick and let it drip along both sides.
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Andrew Gabriel
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