Central Vacuum System installation?

Has anyone any direct experience of installing or using one of these. I am toying with the idea of installing into a 4 bed bungalow.
Regards Peter
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If they get blocked, they can be a pain to clear, so you really need a vacuum that blows as well as sucks. All the pipework can be run in the black or grey 40mm rain water pipe, so that part of it is cheap enough to get. All the bends are best done in the natural curve style to minimise blockages because 90 degree elbows seem to catch things easier than the natural bends. Try not to use the corrugated pipes because they to are subject to catching things and blocking.
Room outlets can be supplied by the small roof vent plates used for the rain water pipe and the hose attachments are easily bought from vacuum suppliers.
Try to get a vacuum that sucks from behind the bag and main filter system, because they draw things into the bag, rather than blow things into the bag like an upright style does and this to minimises the amount of time they get blocked up.
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Hi. I'd suggest no bag, have it blow direct into a dustbin. That means the muck goes thru the fan, so you cant use a cylinder type. Best thing would be a cyclone top that sits on the bin, then the bin itself will filter well. The woodworkers keep making these things.
Also no bag costs, no need to keep changing the bag, no need to tip it into the bin, no handling of dirty hoover bags.
Regards, NT
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My system has a large metal canister - so no bag, and the waste air is then vented by pipe to outside - so no 'vac' smells after it's use.
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I know they're popular in some countries, but I'd have thought a hose long enough to reach round a room from each outlet - assuming one per room or even two - would be just about as heavy and unwieldy as a normal vacuum cleaner. I'd also expect the connection to be rather awkward too with the system switched on. And the large hose would be as difficult to store.
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wrote:

Hose is VERY light, and storage is no harder than storing a traditional vac and it's hose, the position of the outlets are such to make sure hose can reach everywhere.
In addition I have a plinth 'inlet' .. here the kitchen floor can be swept with a brush, and you move it towards the plinth flap, touch the flap with your foot - and it opens and kicks vac into life - sucking everything out.
Great for tiled floors.
Rick
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I have put in my 5 outlet system, over 2 floors on 1 2400 sq ft build, with central vac unit located in garage - this was a Villavent system.
Should be a doddle in a bungalow.
It was easy enough, pipes solvent weld together, it was helped for my build by having a TJI beam floor - which allows drilling of holes almost wherever you want - unlike solid wood joists.
Plan well, to avoid any 90 degree crossing if you have solid joists.
Rick
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