Caustic Soda

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On Mon, 27 Oct 2003 22:21:43 -0000, "stuart noble"

It'll saponify oils though, so it may have an effect on partially cured long-oil varnishes. With waxed or oiled finishes, almost anything could happen.
I use it a lot for cleaning old furniture (gelled with methyl cellulose, and worked with gloved hands), because it's good at clearing handling grease, but doesn't affect most finishes.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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stuart noble wrote:

Plastic covers a wide range of materials##
It certainlty degrades the sorts of plastic bristled bog/dish brushes you buy.

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Yes those are usually polyethylene handles and nylon bristles. Both of them susceptible to NaOH.
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It's never happened to me and I used to use the stuff all day long. It's possible the initial heat generated might be enough to melt nylon. Certainly synthetic bristle paint brushes are not affected

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Sorry, you're wrong. It will turn polyethylene in particular into a brittle dust. Modern paints tend to be alkyd resins (which IIRC sodium hydroxide does remove) or acrylic which is, I think, resistant to alkali.
It's more like NaOH will attack most plastics and lead to them crumbling, but not all. PVC is more resistant than polyethylene but eventually fails because the NaOH removes the plasticiser from PVC leaving it as a brittle powder.
I've seen people make up 0.1N NaOH solutions in laboratories and leave them in polyethylene and polypropylene bottles. After a month or so the bottles turn to something that looks like, and has the sructural properties of, candlewax.
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What do you mean by candlewax?
Mary
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Paraffin wax.
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If paraffin was meant it should have been stated.
Mary
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AYOTB?
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Steve Firth wrote in message <1g3jafd.1xxykhz1t947daN%%steve%

are packaged in plastic tubs, which are obviously resistant because, once opened, they attract moisture, and the crystals would then be attacking the container big time. Also, dilute potassium hydroxide is sold in bog standard 5L plastic jerry cans. I've had one on the shelf for at least 10 years with absolutely no degradation. Come to think of it I've stored 10% caustic in plastic lemonade bottles before now. I suppose it's possible the initial heat reaction might melt low grade plastic but I have never seen the reactions you describe. How the devil would the stuff be distributed?
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On Wed, 29 Oct 2003 10:43:23 -0000, "stuart noble"

Those are _dry_ pellets in the tub, hence unreactive. Get some moisture in there and it's a whole different story.
I happened to notice that my last plastic bottle of caustic soda had an aluminium foil "freshness seal" under the cap. That's going to last seconds, if it ever got damp inside.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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Andy Dingley wrote in message

outdoors because of moisture. The sacks do not degrade in any way. I would like someone to tell me how this stuff could be distributed and stored if this were not the case.
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On Thu, 30 Oct 2003 08:24:04 -0000, "stuart noble"

I've never seen caustic soda in polythene sacks. PVC or polypropylene, yes, but never polythene. Polythene is very permeable to water.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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On Thu, 30 Oct 2003 10:53:13 +0000, Andy Dingley wrote:

Will probably regret asking this, but why is it used as a dpc/dpm material then?
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On Thu, 30 Oct 2003 16:34:25 +0000, John Armstrong

Because it's cheap, and it's reasonably impermeable. Buildings get rained on anyway - there's no point in trying to keep them _absolutely_ dry. And lots of those membranes are PVC anyway, if you're expecting one side to be exposed to saturation.
Look inside a bag of crisps - aluminium metallisation. Look at a telephone cable - aluminium foil wrapper inside.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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Andy Dingley wrote in message ...

Well, quite.
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On Fri, 31 Oct 2003 08:44:09 -0000, "stuart noble"

My walls are rather less affected by a little damp than a sackful of caustic.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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Want a photo ?
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geoff

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"stuart noble" wrote | Come to think of it I've stored 10% caustic in | plastic lemonade bottles before now.
Regardless of the properties of the plastic, storing Nasty Chemicals in lemonade bottles is irresponsible. Somebody sometime is going to make a mistake.
Although you might think they deserve it, you are laying yourself wide open to a hefty claim if any scrote breaks into your garden shed / chemical bunker and takes a quick swig of suspiciously cloudy Fizzy Pineapple.
Owain
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Owain wrote:

And this is where natural selection comes into play. If someone really can't tell the difference between a bottle of drinkable lemonade and a bottle of sodium hydroxide, probably kept in the garage or shed, they really are best out of the genepool.
Irresponsible indeed!

Like hell you are.
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Grunff


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