Cable connectors for telephone wiring

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I'm not being precise enough :) "Normally" I think NTL put the brown box on the outside of a building and feed a cable through to a master box on the inside. In my house, both boxes are on the inside. So if I were with NTL, would my responsibility start with the master socket or the brown box? Both are inside the property - the cable from the box to the socket runs across the cellar ceiling. The brown box also has a co-ax cable - it used to connect to a box in the living room for TV (presumably). It now connects to a box in the bedroom that supplies broadband. I think BT would have something to say if I climbed up a telegraph pole or started poking around in a green cabinet but would NTL say anything about poking around in "their" brown box that's inside a customer's property?
--
john

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They would if you told them, I'm always altering Cable boxes, BT lines and anything else. I don't tell them I do, they don't tell me not to! ..
SJW A.C.S. Ltd.
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Lurch wrote:

Grin :) What are they going to do anyway :)
Lee
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wrote:

Precisely, usually the reason I end up doing it is that the customer has been getting no joy out of NTL etc... My response would be one of 'having to', especially when it's something so simple as altering the route of a cable on a wall that was bodged in to start with. ..
SJW A.C.S. Ltd.
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Sneezy wrote:

I see, my guess would be that NTL would claim to "own" all the coax wiring, judging by their discouragement of any DIY work on this part, and probably up to the master socket for the phone. I know BT claim any internal junction boxes before the master socket are theirs. Any NTL installers on here? :)
Lee
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Sorry to come in late on this one. My NTL engineer gave me a coil of coax and some spare connectors and told me I could cable it up how I liked.
Christian.
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On Sat, 07 Feb 2004 19:16:24 GMT, Sneezy

They do here! We had 3 phone lines into our home (2 for business purposes), and all of them have an NTL master socket inside the house, with NTL's logo on the front.
PoP
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On Sat, 07 Feb 2004 10:53:55 GMT, Sneezy

Commonly known as Jellybeans (Cable Connector 8A). E-mail me your address and I'll send you a few.
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Peter Parry WPP Ltd http://www.wpp.ltd.uk
Antenna solutions for car, caravan, house, office, boat and tent.
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Sneezy wrote:

I asked this question a while ago and managed to track down the beasties in the end with help from various folk round here!
They are a type of skotchlok connector. Pop over to http://rswww.com and type 239-3988 into the search box.
Ignore the silly price that RS want for the crimp tool - an ordinary pair of pliers will work fine (in fact you can even crimp them by hand I found!)
Failing that, for a "one off" joint, then as Harry said, solder and a bit of heatshrink will do the trick nicely.
If you need to make a waterproof joint on something like phone cable I found the following technique works well:-
You will need two sizes of heatshrink - a small one for the individual wire joints, and a larger one that will cover the whole cable. You also need a hot melt glue stick. Solder and sleeve the inner wires as normal (remember to slide the overall sleeve over the cable first as well!) Take your glue stick and shave some fine slivers off it with a sharp knife - insert these into outer heatshrink as you position it over the join. Now when you heat the sleeve the glue melts and encapsulates the joint while at the same time bonding the sleeving to the joint making it all waterproof.
(Failing that, buy some of the ready made heat shrink that already contains the hot melt glue!)
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Cheers,

John.

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On 07/02/2004 John Rumm a wrote :

For waterproof joints, I tend to use Self Amalgamating Tape (3M). For those who have not come across this stuff, it is like a roll of rubbery material, with plastic in the roll to stop it sticking together. The idea is to pull it to stretch it, as you wind it around your joint, to about twice its original length. This causes it to amalgamate into a solid rubber like 'blob' which is completely waterproof and sticks tightly to almost anything.
It is not UV proof, so it therefore requires a final covering of ordinary tape.
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Harry (M1BYT) (Lap)
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A little like the contents of your skull, eh?
I do realize you've been set up, Harry, by people with agendas deeper than yours, but you should've considered this before you got involved.
Fuck off.
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Harry Bloomfield wrote:

I have always found the SA tape I use (CPC I think) is OK with UV exposure... bit fiddly on fine wires though...
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On Sat, 07 Feb 2004 12:23:21 GMT, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

Although cannabis has been lowered to Class C it's still illegal, Harry.
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Phil Kyle - Usenet Legend.

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Oh dead chuffed. It's too dark to see in the cellar but looking at the picture I think I can now see how the little things work. You shove the wires in and press it shut. Not IDC at all.
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john

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On Sat, 07 Feb 2004 19:20:17 GMT, Sneezy

Yes it is, it displaces the insulation to connect, so an Insulation Displacement Connector then. ..
SJW A.C.S. Ltd.
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snipped-for-privacy@telling.you (Lurch) wrote in

But no tool needed though. From what I can gather, IDC is a term for a class of connector rather than, as I originally thought, a connector in itself.
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john

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I think I know what you're saying. Yes, IDC is a _type_ of connector. Some types need tools, some don't. If you meant something different, you'll have to come back for a different answer! ..
SJW A.C.S. Ltd.
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wrote:

Exactly.
On jellybean connectors there is a flat piece of metal with forks, sharp on the inside for where the wires go.
The wires are pushed into the holes in the body of the connector - into the jelly in fact - through to the back. The metal piece is then squeezed down and bites through the insulation and possibly even slightly into the wire. Jelly is displaced towards the holes on pushing the wires in and on crimping In effect the action is like the punchdown in reverse. You can do the crimp action easily with pliers.
.andy
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wrote:

For ribbon cables to connect disk drives etc inside a PC a pair of pliers wouldn't be good enough because you need to close the connectors in parallel, use of a small vice is recommended.
PoP
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wrote:

The proper tool has a 5mm gap in the jaws when fully closed - this gives the correct depth of insertion. It's quite easy if you have not used these crimps before to use too much force which weakens the joint and can split the insulation. A pair of Mole grips set to give a 5mm jaw gap or a large pair of pliers with a small nut taped near the jaw pivot to limit closing to 5mm is the best home made tool when you are first using jellybeans.
--
Peter Parry.
http://www.wpp.ltd.uk/
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