Block up fireplace

Hi,
I have a gas fire in my living room with a marble hearth(sp?) in front of it. I would like to remove it, but ideally in a way that would allow future people in the house to be able to reinstate it relatively easy.
I guess my main questions are :
What decomissioning is required? I assume that Corgi registered person should do this.
What should I cover the hole in the wall with? Wood? Plasterboard? Do I need to leave a ventilation grill?
Should something be done to the chimney?
Thanks for your help.
David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Probably, though as I left the gas elbow joint in position where it comes through the floor ( for future use ) it was easy as pie to disconnect the fire. The operations are:- turn the gas off at the meter, bleed the residual pressure in the pipe off ( if any ) by turning the fire on briefly, then unscrew the slotted cap on top of the gas elbow fitting. Inside will be a slotted brass grub screw. Screw it down inside the elbow until it bottoms - you have just isolated the gas. Turn the gas on at the meter and check that no gas enters the gas fire ( no hiss, no operation ). This is just a check. Turn the gas off at the meter again ( just for safety ). Next, disconnect the gas pipe from the fire to the gas elbow by using a spanner to unscrew the hex nut clamping the pipe into the gas elbow ( it is just like a water pipe - there is an olive on the pipe to provide a seal ). That's it really, and I've really spun it out. I also then turned the gas on at the meter again and drenched the gas elbow with some soapy water to check for any gas leaks. Replace slotted cap on top of gas elbow. Of course, the above is not advice, it's just what I did when I disconnected my fire. You must do what you think is safe.

Yes you need a ventilation grill; moisture can build up in a chimney, from rain etc. Just as cavity walls are ventilated, you must ventilate an unused chimney. I have seen varous attractive vents available which would be suitable for this. Some are adjustable for those winter nights when you don't want hot air going up the chimney. Plasterboard seems fine for closing up the hole.

Up to you; I will say that my chimneys were unused and unventilated for quite some time, and a trip to the loft when I recommissioned them ( I was checking for smoke leaks ) left me puzzled to see brown stains in the lime mortar where the two brick flues joined together to go up to the chimney stack. This brown, dis- coloured mortar was extremely soft and was crumbling. I worked out that rain had come down the chimney, and it must have soaked that part of the flue on a repeat basis, probably reacting with the soot on the inside of the flues to form an acid which rotted the lime mortar. I spent a day raking out the joints in the attic and repointing to assure myself of a good seal, and to stop the remaining soft lime mortar falling out of the joints. So, for belt and braces, put a cowl top on your chimney pot(s), or a half round pot cap or something, to stop the rain getting in. That is a long-term consideration though.
Andy

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Have a qualified person remove the fire and cap the pipe for you, then it is just a case of strapping with a timber frame to make a solid backing for a piece of plasterboard. It is also a good idea to have a cap put on the top of chimney pot if it doesn't already have a rain hood when the gas fire was fitted. If the chimney already has a rain hood then you wont need anything else. You wont need any venting grille unless you are going to have another gas appliance in the same room.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 26 Aug 2003 00:29:44 GMT, BigWallop wrote:

Chimney bases should not be sealed they do need ventilation to keep damp at bay.
--
Cheers snipped-for-privacy@howhill.com
Dave. pam is missing e-mail
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
BillR wrote:

It is very often unneccessary to fit a ventilation grille to a bricked up fireplace. Where one is needed, it is often put indide the room. This is both unsightly and draughty. If one really is needed, it is best if possible to indert an air-brick into the external wall.
--


________________________________________________________________
Sent via the PAXemail system at paxemail.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.