Obsolete Craftsman Cordless Drill - Need Batteries

They've been cooked by the charger that doesn't shut off when they're fully charged.
I'm told by Sears those batteries are obsolete, and after searching www.sears.com/parts, they aren't available online, either.
This tool is hardly used, and I hate to part with it, the case, charge, and two dead batteries.
Batteries, by the way, are 12 v , Model number 315.111010. Drill motor is Model Number 973.27492.
Any input on where to get replacement batteries? Sears has other 12 v batteries similar to this, but they include a slight ridge or "spline" along the round plastic shaft that slips up into the body of the drill motor.
If I attempted to remove this ridge/spline, would it work? These batteries aren't cheap, so I don't want to get involved in something that won't work.
Any ideas? Hacks? Are there batteries out there that I can cross-reference to this one and match it up?
Help! I hate to throw this thing out.
Thanks!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
take the battery pack apart. Possibly there is a manufacturer and part # on the individual batteries in the pack. You may be able to rebuild it.
Bruce Nelson

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bruce:
I see several Panasonic 97-07 batteries linked together.
Any leads as to where I can find these replacement batteries online? I'm looking at Batteries America, but I don't see them.
Thanks!
Tom Hanser Seattle, WA

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Try http://www.batteriesoutlet.com http://www.megabatteries.com http://www.aspencer1.com
Some batteries are heat sensitive. If you can get them with tabs already tack welded, you could solder wire (maybe #16 multistrand) to the tabs, with an appropriate heat sink, to reduce heat load on the battery.
Bruce Nelson

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks, Bruce.
One other option, if I can't find these batteries or don't want to solder them together, is to purchase the newer 12 power pack, and change out the inside batteries. I'm assuming they're the same set of batteries in a slightly different case.
Tom Hanser Seattle, WA

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Or they could be a completely different kind of battery that won't like your old charger.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Typical of craftsman, sell something and don't bother to tell the customer that the batteries will be obsolete, and that it is 'cheaper' to buy a whole new drill. Read 'why I'll never buy craftsman again'.
Dave

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
actually, even when the batteries are available, it is better to buy new. The last time I went to replace a battery pack, I realized that for $5.00 more than the cost of the battery, I could buy a more powerful drill with 2 batteries, charger and case.
This seems to be the case not only with craftsman, but with other cordless vendors as well: the package of drill, 2 batteries, charger, and case, costs less than 2 replacement batteries. And governments wonder where the landfill space goes.
Bruce Nelson

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thus spake Tom Hanser:

They are likely "sub-C" size (slightly smaller than your hardware store "C" cell. If they're NiCd (likely), any brand NiCd of that size will work. Many suppliers. I like www.jameco.com for batteries. Order NiCd tabbed sub-C cells. Don't solder directly to the battery ends; get "tabbed" cells and solder the tabs together or bridge them with wire.
That one cell up the stalk will be a problem if you can't get it out.
Good luck, Dave
--
Please, no "Go Google this" replies. I wouldn't
ask a question here if I hadn't done that already.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If everything fails there is another option . You can attach two wires to the terminals inside drill and alligator clips on the other end, then you can connect it to any 12 to 18 volt power source. Cheap 12 volt lawn mower batteries work great but of course you have the cord to deal with but its still portable.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There's an idea !!!!
Now where do I find a cheap 14.4V battery that will run my old laptop? (new battery is about $375, and the laptop is not worth it).
Bruce Nelson

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Good idea, Toyman. At least I wouldn't have to dispose of a virtually new drill motor.
I notice once I got inside the battery pack, there are a cluster of about seven batteries wired together. One battery is inserted up into the cylindrical piece with the terminals on it, but it doesn't want to come out - I wonder if it's soldered to the terminals?
This might be a problem.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Probably spot welds. See if you can cut the tabs. I understand it is better to try to avoid applying heat directly to the battery.
Bruce

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
replying to Tom Hanser, Bummer wrote:

Sears parts direct. And at sears 9000neiman rd Lenexa or overland park kansas Mine was stolen in front of me so now it's a gift from me to him. All I want to know is the specs...... Torck...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.