kitchen faucet

I am trying to avoid replacing my kitchen faucet. No name but appears to be of quality. We bought the house last year so no history other than the faucet has periods of good flow and slow flow. The pipes are galvanized and all the other faucets have strong water pressure.
It was working fine and then slowed down. We were trying different things and put one of those end of faucet diverters and the pressure went back up. I do not understand it. The hose end sprayer suffers the same fate. Now everything is working slow. About the only thing I can think of is that there is something in the faucet preventing the water flow that comes and goes. The screen at the end of the faucet is clear.
This is my first time on this newsgroup so this probably has been covered.
Any ideas are most appreciated.
Thanks.
Charles
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Is it doing with the hot and cold water?
Robert

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Robert, thanks for the quick response.
There is absolutely no difference in pressure going from hot to cold and back to hot.
Charles

things
Now
and
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Charles
Should have ask you also is it a single handle or does it have two handles. Either way it may have a bunch of galvanize rust built up, where the hot and cold join. That is where the spout is. You may try taking the faucet apart and cleaning it and replace the seats my help it. It sounds like you are fixing to be replacing more than a faucet though. You are probably fixing to be replacing some of your galvanize lines in the near future. Even if you can clean the faucet out.
Hope this helps you. Even if it is partial bad news. Galvanize pipes suck!
Robert

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The house was built in the 1920's for a banker just prior the the stock market crash. The kitchen has been remodeled a couple of times and is tremendus condition. The faucet is single handle. You may be on the right track regarding the rust build up.
Charles

the
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There is a terminology issue, here. "No difference in 'pressure' "? Are you measuring pressure? I doubt it. Even if you did, you'd probably be measuring static pressure (in the absence of flow) which would be pointless. I think you are trying to say "no difference in observable FLOW." Correct me if I misunderstand. This is not a trivial point. However, it sounds like your faucet is obstructed. I would replace the faucet. At least you might take the whole thing apart, locate the obstruction, and clear it. You're SURE your spout screen is not obstucted? How's the flow, with the screen removed?

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Yes, you are right: No difference in observable FLOW.
Removing the screen does not affect the flow.
I am going to take off the stainless mesh hoses and see if there is an obstruction. My wife thinks that the hoses may also contain a screens that may be clogged.
Thanks.

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"Charles Williams"
This is what you do. Take apart the faucet to see if there's any obstruction. If that doesn't work, take the supply lines apart (there aren't screens in there, but don't make fun of your wife), if that doesn't work, the next suspects are the stop valves. Shut off the house valve and take them apart or replace them. If that doesn't work, then it's the galvanized pipes. That doesn't mean you have to repipe the whole house. A good plumber is a good detective, and can often isolate the problems without replacing everything. If you have galvanized pipes, though, it might be good to repipe if you can afford it.
BTW, it's been my experience that when non-plumbers take things apart, they can't get them back together.
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yep, move backwards one step at a time untill you have flow. Almost always most cost effective for me to just put new in there and not waste time friggen around. If the faucet is from the 20's then it is likely in the galv supply line. or the stops under the counter.

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Everybody, thanks for the help.
We put in a new faucet yesterday and the wife thinks she has a new kitchen.

doesn't
and
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wow....I could put in a new kitchen,and the wife would think she got a new faucet!

house.
be
apart,
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You didn't mention the approximate age of the house but if the galvanized piping is old, there is a likelihood of tuberculation of the pipes which can often release loose particles to clog valves and fittings. When you cleaned the diverter screens did you notice any rusted sediments? Such sediments, if any can also affect the free flows in the valves. Check the shut off valve under the sink and the kitchen valve itself.
Charles Williams wrote:

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