Bath & Sink Waste Pipe


Could someone please tell me what is right or wrong. I have just fitted a complete new soil stack and bathroom suite. At the moment the only thing connected to the soil stack is the toilet. I now have to tee in the bath and sink waste pipes. Could someone tell me is it OK to tee the bath and sink waste into the soil stack above the tee piece for the toilet or should it be below the tee?
Thanks
Owl
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It doesn't matter. What you must do, though, is properly vent both fixtures. As long as the sink is less than 5' from the soil stack (technically it's really the "stack vent" at that point), put the tee in such a way that it runs horizontally directly to the sink trap, with proper fall. The tub will require that you run a vent from the tee for the tub trap, and terminate it 42" above the floor level back into the stack vent. If you put the tub drain in above the toilet tee, then the toilet should be similarly vented. There are some other possible variables. Write back with more questions if you have them. (BTW, guys, I'm writing this from my new place in Kosovo).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It is only a soil stack if it conveys soil more then 1 branch interval (1 story), such as the second floor down to the first and any vent above it is considerd a stack vent. Anything less would be a vent stack.
But to answer your question if the toilet were to be tied into the stack with a trap arm, anything at that level such as a tub trap would also be stackvented by the same vent stack/stack vent as long as the trap distances were met by your local/state code. The sink could be piped to that level but would require a seperate vent, that could tie back into that stack 6" above the flood rim of the sink.
"or" many codes allow the lav. sink to be tied into the stack above the lower levels and not effect the venting, due to the fact that it is only 1 DFU from the lav. and would fall into the highest fixture on a stack catagory.
kenny b
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If this bathroom group is the only thing on this "stack" (technically a stack is a soil or waste pipe which drains through at least one full story, otherwise its just a soil or waste pipe) then all three fixtures may be tied directly to the stack providing the fixtures are all tied in separately and directly (at different levels) and the toilet is the lowest connection, and none of the trap arms extend far enough to achieve one pipe diameter fall. (i.e. 1 1/2" trap = 6 ft maximum @ 1/4" per foot grade) Using this configuration is the simplest and does not require any additional venting. This is called a vertically wet vented group, and is permitted at least by the national plumbing code of canada.
You could also horizontally wet vent it, but that tends to get confusing, and complicated for do it yourselfers, and would require additional vent pipes.
Leon Bourassa Journeyman Plumber/Gas fitter BYRD Plumbing & Heating

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
(technically a stack is a soil or waste pipe which drains through at least one full story, otherwise its just a soil or waste pipe)
Technically a stack is a general term for a soil, waste or vent pipe which has a min. of 1 branch interval in height (equal to one-story in height)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.