Wiring GFCI help


I have a 30+ year old house. I want to add a GFCI near the kitchen sink
This is what I have to work with From the breaker box
Red - hot breaker 1 Black - hot breaker 2 White - neutral
Both breakers share the same neutral - they are chained together through 4 outlets
Red Outlet 1 (needs GFCI) Red Outlet 2 (needs GFCI) Black Outlet 3 (needs nothing) Black Outlet 4 (needs nothing)
I tried to install the GFCI in outlet 1, but since it just constantly trips. When I isolated the white from breaker 2 and was just using breaker 1, it was ok.
Any suggestions??
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The problem is on the "Load" side of the GFI outlet. You attached the red and neutral going to the next outlet, however the neutral is also feeding the #3 &4 outlets. Since only the nuetral is GFI Protected, but not the black wire, it senses a current imbalance and trips. There are 2 ways to correct this. 1) Run a seperate neutral wire from outlet #1 to outlet #2 ( probably hard to do if walls are closed) Or maybe easier: 2) Connect GFI on outlet #1, but nothing on Load side, and connect another GFI on outlet #2 again with nothing on load side. This leaves the black circuit by itself.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mikepier wrote:

I cannot run a second neutral wire.
So I just need to buy another GFCI for #2. What do you mean by not using the load side?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The load side of a GFCI is used when you want that GFCI to not only protect that outlet, but also other outlets. The other outlets are connected to the load side of the one GFCI.
The easiest solution to your Edison circuit problem is to just use two GFCIs in the two outlets and NOT use the load side.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

OK
I see now.
Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you look on the back of a GFI outlet, the top terminals are labeled "LINE" and the bottom terminals are labeled "LOAD". The incoming feed goes to "LINE", then usually to feed another circuit, you connect the outgoing feed to "LOAD". This means any outlet downstream is protected. So if the GFI tripped, the downstream outlets would be dead also. However your situation is different. You have to basically install the GFI's as stand alone outlets, not feeding other outlets. But continue feeding the other outlets by just wire nutting in the box.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mikepier wrote:

Why would you ever ever want downstream outlets dead too?

--
Blattus Slafaly ? 3 :) 7/8

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
So you have more protected outlets using less GFCIs
--
Mikey S.
"Blattus Slafaly" < snipped-for-privacy@roadrunner.com> wrote in message >
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

re: Why would you ever ever want downstream outlets dead too?
I have 3 receptacles in my garage. The "first" is a GFCI, the other 2 are on the load side.
I can use any (or all) receptacle and have protection at each one.
In my basement bathroom, I have a light fixture over the shower stall. It is on the load side of the GFCI, just in case...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Actually I think it is required by code that any light or fan inside the shower must be on a GFI.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mikepier wrote:

Yes I believe it is.
What I meant was just to show another reason for using the load side of the GFCI. The "just in case" was the reason - just in case someone comes in contact with the fixture (and it's hot, etc.)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mikepier wrote:

I installed these as stand alone outlets. Everyyhing works perfect now Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

As Mikepier suggested, don't connect anything to the load side of any GFCI. You have an Edison circuit, which makes things a little more complicated. Wherever you want a GFCI outlet, remove the existing outlet, splice the neutral wires together with a pigtail to the GFCI and if there is more than one hot wire on the existing outlet, splice them together also with a pigtail to the new GFCI
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.