Windows Replacement

I searched through the group and still need to ask for help.
I have a brick house with aluminum windows/double pane. These windows sweat like crazy in the winter due to our heating with gas/LP. I would like to install another type window inside these windows. The present windows were installed prior to the brick and were nailed to the exterior side of the wall studs, so removal of these would not only be painful but expensive as well.
I would like to just use the current windows as a storm window and install an double hung style window inside of the current windows, but am not sure this is possible. I have two 3.0 X 6.0 windows, three 3.0 X 5.0 windows, two 2.4 X 3.0 windows and one 6.0 X 6.0 mulled window.
What options do I have?
Thanks for your assistance!!
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Messy for sure, an angle grinder and a cut-off blade and I can have each window out in less than 30 minutes. I said out, I did not mention their condition.

I built a guys house that was the orginial owner of Western Glass in Arizona. His home was done exactly the way your describing, with single paned glass.... This was WAY before double, tripple glazing circa 1974. Opening the outside sash was a pain in the ass.

You seem to be bandaiding the problem rather than solving it. Moisture is controllable. Do you have a humidifier? When was it serviced last? Have you checked with a pro? Do you have a hygrometer? Have you sought professional help locally.
There are a ton of things to be considered before embarking on a major project like this. We can not see the situation and are guessing... Sorry to rain on your parade.
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LP gas or any heating system , electric, Ng, oil, does not add humidity on it own , if it does its emitting Co and you would be sick. Humidifiers add humidity, cooking, showering, etc. Windows condense because it is the coldest area of the house, poor designs have little insulation value. Dual pane does not mean high insulation, CDF is condensing factor, a rating Pella scores poorly on compared to Anderson. You have not determined humidity is high and its not just poor glass or a humidifier or tight house. If windows are sealed shut as you seem to indicate than how do you open the casements. Start with a calibrated analog humidisat, one you set-calibrate yourself, or a good digital and see where you are. If you have a humidifier , turn it down till condensation stops.
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Thanks for the replies, you have pointed me in some new directions to look into for the cause of the humidity. I do agree that the windows are not of the best design, but I do not have a humidifier nor do I have a dehumidifier either. I really don't want to remove the windows that are in place as that would be a real task. I pointed to the condensation as one of the major problems. The other problem these windows have is that they just do not insulate well at all and was looking at something to use as a storm window type setup in the end. Using the existing window as the storm window and a better insulating window inside. I looked at replacement windows in vinyl as the windows to place inside the current windows but am not sure that this would work. I could remove the sheet rock in the window holes and place the new window in the hole as close to the inside as possible and then use trim to finish the window out. Of course using the necessary sealants to insure an air tight fit.
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