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Which of these chemicals has been tested (the way drugs are tested) on humans, especially children?
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Let's try a different angle here. Your kid's got an ear infection. He doesn't get them often. The doctor says "Any antibiotic would work. But, just for grins, let's try this new drug. It's barely been tested, and only on rats."
What do you say?
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I say go get your GED and come back later.
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wrote:

There is, in fact, at least one case that APPEARS to be from straight contact, poisoning. Of course, that was a set of lumber that turned out to have an order of magnitude more CCA than the industry standard. The lumber in question was described as "oozing".
Generally, to have a noticable health effect from treated lumber, you have to eat it, burn it, or use power tools on it without a breath-mask in a closed environment. The worst predictable effect from skin contact is dermatitis.
I s'pose its possible that the stuff in more dangerous than I think it is, but if so, you'd think that the web-sites of people pushing the meme would point to better evidence than they do. When you have to hunt all over the planet for horror stories, it's kind of hard to take the threat seriously.
--Goedjn
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