Why the wide prong on a plug?

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Phil Again wrote:

This is called bureaucratic bullshit.
--
Claude Hopper :)

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While this is true, it also true that manufacturers need to make products as stupid proof as possible. The cost of the plug is minimal, and really causes no inconvenience to the users, as you will get it right 50% of the time without even looking. Don't sweat over such minor stuff, when there is some serious stuff out there you really need to worry about.
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On Mon, 27 Oct 2008 13:51:10 -0400, "EXT"
[snip]

But it'll seem more like 10% because of selective memory.

No worrying, but a bit of arithmetic:
Can you turn a plug around in 2 seconds? That's an average of 1 second, since you have to turn it around half the time.
Now, how many times do you plug things in? It it's just 10 times a day, that's 36524 times a year (based on average 365.24 days per year). That's over 10 hours a year.
About 3 DAYS (and I mean REAL DAYS, 24 hours each) of your life wasted because of the unnecessary use of polarized plugs! Is that so minor now?
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The sky is falling down! We must tell the king!
(I spend more time scrolling through idiot bottom posted messages than I do on reversing plugs.)
--
Christopher A. Young
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Let's see,

how do I respond to

this idiot...

Oh, I know, I'll put

my response where ever

the hell, I feel

like
because
it doesn't matter what anyone

else is

doing.
What I do is

right and everyone else is an idiot.
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On Mon, 27 Oct 2008 21:24:48 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

and stupidly believing that one problem (posting location), automatically negates another problem (reversing plugs).

The idiots aren't the ones bottom-posting.
The idiots aren't the ones top-posting.
The idiots are the ones calling others idiots because of their posting location, while simultaneously creating a worse problem (posting your sig in the wrong place, interfering with quoting and replies).
"So, the 16-ton weight falling on you today means the 9-ton weight falling on you last week didn't hurt at all. I'm dropping ONLY the 9-ton weight, because that one doesn't hurt :-)"
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Gary H wrote:

Let's try my math:
It takes me less than a minute grab the bottle of White-Out and put a white dot on a black plug - or a magic marker if the plug is white.
Since all the receptacles in my house are installed the same way, all the plugs go in the same way - "dot up".
BTW - do you really plug things in 10 times a day on average? And that's just 2 pronged "things". I could go days without plugging a single 2 pronged device in. It would take an awful lot of "make up" plug-ins to average 10 if you miss a day or two here and there.
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wrote:

Don't forget to multiply that time by the number of plugs you do this to.

You'd still have to LOOK at the plugs, possibly taking the time to turn on a light. Even if you could feel the dots, it'd still take time to feel them, turning the plug around if necessary.
And (again, since too many ignore it) Don't forget to multiply that time by the number of plugs you do this to.
BTW, My last two cars have had 2-edged (rotationally symmetrical) keys, so you don't have to waste time turning the key around to use it.

I guess I plug in 2-prong (polarized) plugs about that often (an average of 10 times a day).
--
58 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
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re: I guess I plug in 2-prong (polarized) plugs about that often (an average of 10 times a day).
'splain that please.
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Kist curious, what do you plug in ten times a day. I bet I don't change more than one plug in a week. Maybe I can retire early with that 10 hours a year savings.
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Polarized plugs is a good idea, but making both sides of the plug feel the same was a mistake. There should be a tab or something so you can feel the right way without all the trial and error.
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On Mon, 27 Oct 2008 22:43:26 -0500, Bert Byfield

Many polarized plugs have both the prongs the same where they come out of the body of the plug, then one gets smaller (corners cut off) and the other gets larger. You should be able to feel that.
Of course, that still takes time (and don't forget to multiply by the number of plugs you insert).
--
58 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
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Phil Again wrote:

The NEC is written by panels that include many interests - manufacturers, engineers, contractors, labor, affected industries. UL and the NEC try to be compatible (but I can think of at least one place they conflict). As far as I know, the NEC has no standards for receptacle configurations except RVs and trailer parks.                                          UL develops standards for products from different panels of knowledgeable people. It is independent from the NFPA and NEC, but people involved also want UL standards and the NEC to not conflict. UL does not adopt the NEC.
UL standards are for product manufacturing. The NEC is primarily an installation standard.
The NEC has limited product design requirements. Equipment installed must be "approved". Approval is strictly the decision of the "authority having jurisdiction" which is typically a state or municipality. The AHJ usually wants products to be "UL listed" (or maybe listed /labeled another reputable lab which probably tests to UL standards).
NEMA is a manufacturers group. It sets a number of standards. The question is how those standards become requirements for equipment. NEMA receptacle configurations may be included in some UL standards, I don't know. UL could also just have performance and design standards, for example plugs must be polarized, with specific configuration selected by manufacturers. (NEMA categories for enclosures have been adopted by the NEC.)
--
bud--

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The "polarized" plug is for extra user safety. AC outlets have polarity-specific sockets because some devices can easily become dangerous if the polarized device is plugged in backwards. This happens when the switch or fuse inside the appliance is designed to disconnect only the "hot" and not the "neutral" wire when the device is switched off because it is cheaper than switches that disconnect both wires. The "neutral" wire is typically connected to ground at the main panel, so it is safer to use the switch to open the "hot" wire.
The device could still be "hot" even when the switch is off. Without a polarized plug, you can't tell which wire the switch will disconnect and may receive a shocking surprise!
In theory, safe devices are designed to keep a user from touching either the hot or the neutral. designers know which wires will be "hot" inside the device, they can take extra precautions to make sure they cannot break apart and electrify anything a user can touch. A broken "hot" wire can electrocute a user. Therefore, many appliances now have a polarized plug so the switch always disconnects the "hot" side.
A so-called "double-insulated" (IEC Class II) device may have a non-polarized plug because the same safe design has been made for BOTH conductors No single internal fault would be likely to cause an electrocution hazard.
Furthermore, even with a polarized plug, a single internal fault can be deadly in an ordinary appliance. The third prong (ground) can save your life if there is an internal fault of the hot touching exposed metal, and a GFCI can save your life if there is an internal fault of the neutral to exposed metal (where you could otherwise become the missing "neutral" connection to ground as you are electrocuted).
You are an ignorant fool to grind down the polarized plug.
--
Christopher A. Young
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The rest of the time, you can have the safety of having a three wire grounded device. I'm with you, I do carry the three to two "cheaters".
--
Christopher A. Young
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marlboroman wrote:

Because there is only one company that makes the plugs, and it's cheaper to make just one kind of plug and send it out to everyone than to make two kinds of plugs and keep track of who is buying what type of plug.
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snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

GEEZ! And I thought the other guy was silly.
TDD
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On Oct 28, 12:39pm, snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

Nice try...
A quick scan of my office shows at least 5 different kinds of 2 prong plugs.
Granted, some of the plugs are at least a few months old so that one company may have bought everyone out since then...
I kid because I care.
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On Sun, 26 Oct 2008 21:39:27 -0700 (PDT), marlboroman

The wide blade is the neutral. The smaller blade is the hot side. It may not make a difference if the two are reversed, but not always.
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Expecially with, say, an old TV or radio. With new electronic gear, defeating the plug so you can plug it backwards will usually result in loss of operations some how; e.g. deficient spike/surge protection on a laptop, picture problems on a TV set, interference & noise on a radio, etc.. Personally I've never seen one misused. Anything that's not a proper Class II appliance always has the polarized blade, proper Class II devices do not.
Long discussion over nothing though.
wrote:

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