Why are copper fittings brighter than copper pipe?

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I'm going to be building something - not plumbing - with 3/4" copper pipe. As you can see from this image, the pipe is a different "color" than the fittings. The fittings are bright copper, the pipe itself is much duller.
Anybody know why that is or more importantly, how to shine up the pipe so that it matches the fittings?
http://tinyurl.com/CopperPipeColor
Full link:
http://i440.photobucket.com/albums/qq121/DerbyDad03/20160326_183023_zpsxbg1l4fw.jpg
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snipped-for-privacy@eznet.net says...

Try Brasso.
--
RonNNN

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On Sat, 26 Mar 2016 15:44:09 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Wrot copper fittings are cold formed in a mold. Pipe is extruded. If you don't lacquer them or something they will both tarnish.
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On 3/26/2016 6:44 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Two factors. They use a slightly different alloy in each and the manufacturing process is different. I believe that is a bit of zinc in the fitting to make them easier to form. Not enough to be called brass though. May be some other alloys too.
Many years since I was involved it that. We used different copper tubing to form return bends for coils than we used for the tubes but I did not buy the material so I don't know the specs.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com says...

My guess is a moonshine still.
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not with soldered joints I hope
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On Sat, 26 Mar 2016 23:09:36 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Lead free silver solder.
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On Sat, 26 Mar 2016 23:21:45 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Even lead free solder will give the whiskey a nasty wang. Stills are usually solid copper with friction fittings.
I really like glass for this but the size is somewhat limited. I have used 5 gallon water bottles back when they were glass but you have to be real careful bringing up the heat slowly and more importantly, letting them cool down slowly. You can pour the mash out OK but let them sit on a dry block of wood or something until they are just warm to the touch before you load the next batch. I had a copper end cap that was just a nice friction fit in the hole, inverted and a hole in that for a 1/2" soft copper coil. I leaked a little but it worked. You can cascade another one behind that for a "thumper" if you really want to get sophisticated. The stuff coming out of the thumper will burn in your lighter.
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On 3/27/2016 2:52 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Ever watch an episode of Moonshiners?
They sure do a of of soldering on the sheets of copper used to form the still. Once it leaves the pot it is usually friction fit.
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There is drinking whiskey and selling whiskey. If selling, they do not care about the lead that might come out of the solder.
About 30 years ago the wife and I was watching some show about moonshing and they mentioned the lead solder. I told her that one day someone is going to complain about the lead in the solder in the pipes in many of the houses in the US. About 10 years later someone picked up on this.
Now with all the lead scare, many of the electronic devices are going to last a few years and then quit because of the tin whiskers.
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On Sun, 27 Mar 2016 02:52:08 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Silver solder is used in commercial stills - along with brazing.. Pretty hard to make a "kettle" without soldering or brazing - an expert can roll and beed the joints and get them ALMOST hooch-tite - but any leak will cause the still to blow - so the outside of even a well rolled seam will be soldered.

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On 3/27/2016 4:01 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Center posted, as your reply was. - . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Sunday, March 27, 2016 at 5:34:21 PM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

If you are going to join the modern world and center post a response like normal people, at least learn how to do it neatly.
What a mess you made of your response!
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On 3/27/2016 8:00 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Yeah, Clare!
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Christopher A. Young
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  Click to see the full signature.
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wrote:

Wrought copper fittings are c12200 alloy.12200 is 99.90% pure copper with phosphorous added to deoxidize.. Seamless copper pipe may be manufactured from any of five (5) copper alloys (C10200, C10300, C10800, C12000, C12200) that all conform to the chemical composition requirements of alloys containing a minimum of 99.9% Copper (Cu) and a maximum of 0.04% Phosphorous (P).
About the only difference chemically between the alloys is the amount of phosphorous remaining in the alloy. The manufacturing process - drawn vs wrought, will produce varying grain structures, and the temper will also change the grain structure - which will cause variation in the colour of the copper as produced. Some of the colour variability can be reduced by removing the "mill finish" and oxides by polishing, but different grain structures will reflect light differently, producing different colour effects.. Soft drawn (flexible /annealed) copper tubing will more closely match the colour of the wrought copper fittings available today.
Years ago the majority of copper plumbing fittings more closely matched the colour of Type K, L, and M hard copper, while today they more closely match the soft copper, leading me to believe they have changed the production method used for producing the fittings. I HAVE noticed the newer fittings are lighter and appear to be softer than the fittings I grew up with.
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Newer fittings are "lighter", in color or in weight or both?
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On Sat, 26 Mar 2016 21:12:23 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

my experience is both.
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On Saturday, March 26, 2016 at 5:44:13 PM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:

...might I suggest the look of this: http://tinyurl.com/h6g8chy
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On Sunday, March 27, 2016 at 12:37:04 PM UTC-4, bob_villain wrote:

You might suggest it, but we've already decided on (and purchased) galvanized floor flanges, copper pipe and brass pot hooks.
It's the look SWMBO wants and it's the look SWMBO is going to get.
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On Sun, 27 Mar 2016 11:38:40 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Don't let her see the brass flanges or you'll end up with a "change order" and a trip to return the galvanized fittings.
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