Whirlpool washer fun

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bob wrote:

Impressive repair job, Bob. I've replaced the pump twice on my old kenmore/whirlygig, and I hope I never get the pleasure of digging apart the timer!
Jon
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On 4/18/2010 7:32 AM, Jon Danniken wrote:

When i was trying to get the crud out of the pump, i released the two spring holders and tried to pull the pump off. It seemed to be stuck, that's when i just used the needle nose to pull the crap out of it. I was afraid if i put too much force on it i would ruin it and create another issue. It does seem to be draining, but i wonder if some of the impellers in the pump were damaged due to the crud stuck inside. The pump impeller must have been welded by crud to the end of the motor shaft.
bob
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the
the
When a similar thing happened to me (wife's nylon ped escaped the delicates bag), the nylon stretched to about 20 times its original length and wrapped around the impeller drive shaft.
I spent hours unwinding it and cleaning all the crud, got a greasy as a White Castle hamburger and nicked every knuckle on my hands. I was so proud of having found the problem, took the machine apart, pulled the super-elongated footwear out and gotten the whole machine back together.
Despite my heroic efforts, when I got home from work the next day, my wife had purchased a new Sears unit that was on sale and had the old one hauled away. I was more than a little peeved but she pointed to a white blouse she had washed in the machine that now had a big grease stripe on it. Apparently I didn't wipe the tub down as well as I thought. She told me that she knew the only way to keep me from chopping it up for parts was to spirit it away while I was at work.
I think the only thing I ever worked on that was harder to reach was the power steering pump on an old Jag sedan. After trying to replace it I reached the conclusion that they began the car's assembly by having someone hold the steering pump in the air and then assembling the entire rest of the car around it. Whitworth, SAE and metric screws, too!
The best part is that when the PS pump gasket failed (it was at some incredibly high PSI - I want to say over 2000, but that may be a total brain lapse) it spewed power steering fluid all over the always overheated exhaust manifold, emitting a cloud of smoke that looked like D-Day invasion camoflauge.
-- Bobby G.
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My ancient Whirlpool has come up parts NLA (no longer available) at my parts house. I've kept it running with oiling the electric motor, and later the water discharge pump. I've also had to clean the timer with a big dose of electical contact cleaner, and then reoil the timer. Plans are to keep it going as long as possible.
--
Christopher A. Young
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I would have thought a seized pump make a hell of a lot of noise like it did on my old Kenmore. The motor should have had enough torque to spin the belt around the pump pulley causing a heck of a racket. If the motor just locked up it likely cycled on its built in thermal/current overload protection but I would also think it should trip a breaker if locked up.
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On 4/18/2010 7:49 AM, Jeff The Drunk wrote:

This was a direct drive pump. It was not locked up until the end, but the crud in it put a extra load on the motor. It seemed also the impellers were flexible inside so they would give some rather than be rigid. That probably explains why it did not lock up before
bob
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My siezed up pump just gave a vague over heating smell, as the belt slipped.
--
Christopher A. Young
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On Sun, 18 Apr 2010 15:45:17 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

The ones made since the Carter administration do not have a belt. The pump is direct drive and the transmission is driven through a plastic coupler designed to shear off before you break something expensive.
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I don't know off hand when they changed over. I do know that my machine is belt drive, and has served me well.
--
Christopher A. Young
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On Sat, 17 Apr 2010 22:34:56 -0500, bob wrote:

If the contacts were badly pitted, they might not last *that* long before they fail again (but that's worst-case and you're still extending the life of the washer for a bit longer*).
I remember taking apart timers as a kid - some of them have a bazillion switch contacts in them that are all the same design. If you have one like that then I bet you could swap contacts with good ones that control a washer program that you never use...
* and by the time it dies next, new front-loaders might be a fair price...
cheers
Jules
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On 4/19/2010 7:28 AM, Jules Richardson wrote:

I really did not think this would be a permanent repair. But it buys me time to maybe find a used timer or other cheaper part. Somewhere out there is someone who is throwing away a washer with a bad motor and a good timer,,,
Maybe in the future i will get one of these tosser front loads and try to restore it to life. I still don't know if i am 100% sold that they are a long term wise idea.
bob
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On Mon, 19 Apr 2010 09:31:01 -0500, bob wrote:

good call! :-)

They work - or at least the ones I grew up with in europe did. Problem in the US is that they're still expensive compared to identical-featured models in the rest of the world (why? maybe just because the manufacturers think that's what people are prepared to pay?), and I'm not sure the service/spares availability is there quite yet.
Give it a few years though and I think they'll be a good investment...
cheers
Jules
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SNIP.
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