Whirlpool "Heavy Duty" top loader washing machine - door switch?

I have a used Whirlpool "Heavy Duty" top loader washing machine. It is pro bably 15-20 years old, and the lid switch is broken. Also, the rubber stop s onto which the lid sits (when lowered) are missing, so the lid goes down to metal and I suspect that is what ruined the lid switch.
First, how do I find the model number - I didn't see a tag with the model n umber and serial number anywhere - since I bought it used from a repair sho p, I now suspect they removed the tag before I bought it - is there some wa y for me to identify the model number of this Whirlpool washer?
Second, how do I lift the whole top of the washer upwards so I can get at t he lid switch? I see some latches or sorts at the distal ends on the whole top on the right and left, but, I don't know how to trip them so I can swi ng the whole top upwards, hinged at the back under the control panel.
Is there a special tool I need to trip these latches?
Who sells the rubber stops, and will I be able to get a lid switch without knowing the exact model number? It just says Whirlpool Heavy Duty (no tag a nymore).
It was working fine a few years ago when I put it in storage, and, now I ne ed to put it back in use, but, I am hit with these problems.
Help.
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I got help on the model number and it was "hidden" underneath the lid. The model number is: LA5500XSN1.
I also found a website that sells the lid switch and lid stops:
whirlpool.partselect.com/
I still need help figuring out how to trip those latches so I can lift the whole washer top.
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On 4/23/2015 4:30 PM, Jlynn Littleberry wrote:

Shove in the end of an old (or new) putty knife. Pull up on the top. Might need to pry up a bit with a plastic chain saw wedge, or flat screw driver.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On 4/23/2015 3:07 PM, Jlynn Littleberry wrote:

this one?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MFsvLiuTniU

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On Thu, 23 Apr 2015 13:07:17 -0700 (PDT), Jlynn Littleberry

You don't need the lid switch. Bypass it, and then you can throw in more clothesw and soap without the machine stopping. Just don't put your hand in there, esp. during the spin cycle.
If you reallly want the lid switch, drill out the rivets and repair the switch. That's what I did with a previous machine, that I found on the street in Brooklyn, It took me an hour and as soon as I was done, I realized I ddin't want the lid switch so I stuffed a little paper wad in the hole where the lid piece goes. I had that machine for 5 years.

Use GE Silicone to make new bumpers. White, Clear, even Black. Pul on a blob in each spot. Put vaseline on the places where the bumpers will rest, and then lower the lid gently, so that it rests on both bumpers. The vaseline is there so the bumpers won't stick to the metal beneath them.

I doubt it. I think it's in the back. My machine is 35 years old and works fine. Well I probably need a new belt, because I tightened it as much as I could, and it's started slipping on spin again. But my point is that 20 yeas is nothing.

Grab the top at each side and lift hard.

They aren't really latches. They sheet springs maybe 5/8" wide, probably two of them.
The problem with a tool is that it's likely to chip the paint.

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wrote:

Something plastic would be good, and smooth and tapered. Or take a screwdriver and wrap non-corrugated cardboard around it to try to protect the enamel.
But mostly put your fingertips in the groove where the top meets the rest and try to pry the lid up. Once you move the lid at all, even 1 or 2 mm. maybe with a tool, it gets easier. .
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On Thursday, April 23, 2015 at 8:10:17 PM UTC-4, micky wrote:

All the machines I've had, I could open it when it was operating as long as it wasn't the spin cycle. Might be OK to bypass the spin cycle lockout, but I'd make sure I considered who might be around when it's operating, like little kids.
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I appreciate the responses. I did find the model number (LA5500XSN1) and I contacted Whirlpool about instructions on lifting the top but they conside r those instructions to be TOP SECRET INFORMATION and advise you to "contac t an authorized service center", a list of which they are eager to cite.
I am going to try the silicon gel notion for the bumpers because the shippi ng costs are out of bounds for these $3 items.
I am willing to bypass the lid switch but I am still stumped and very frust rated as to how to lift the top of the machine so I could at least SEE the underside. When I tried using a putty knife between the top and the sides, it hits some kind of immovable obstructions, with the rigidity of a tighte ned BOLT securing the top to the sides, and, I even deformed the metal of t he top slightly by attempting to pry the top upwards as I forcefully hammer ed the putty knife against whatever was holding the top down - it just woul dn't budge. So I am starting to think the top for this model doesn't swing up like that and those are not latches, but tightened bolts holding it on.
The video (above) shows how the entire cover (top and sides) comes off, as an entire unit, after you remove the console, and, that might be the correc t way for this model, but I haven't found the screws that are holding down the console to the frame yet.
It is not knowing the scheme for this model that is so frustrating - I thin k Whirlpool is just being greedy by not allowing owners to see the step-by- step instructions for removing the top. Trying the putty knife, or just gr abbing real hard and lifting, or using a wedge just deformed the metal of t he top. The thing is that each model has a different scheme and I am hopin g someone has THIS model and knows the steps - there are places that CHARGE for the service manual, but, there is no guarantee that these instructions will even be included - they seem to be hung up on suggesting that you "co ntact an authorized service center".
Thanks for all the help - if anyone has this particular model and has gone through removing the top, please respond.
Meanwhile, I think I'll just hook it up and hope the switch has failed in t he "ON" position and I'll run it without any lid switch.
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On Fri, 24 Apr 2015 08:16:24 -0700, Jlynn Littleberry

I was once told when I wanted to disable that stupid 'locking' latch that holds the lid down: "The switch is combined with the motor, if you disable the thermal switch/lock; you will prematurely burnout your motor." Lie? Don't know, but I simply physically pulled the thermal lock switch and let it dangle down inside the machine, out of the way. So any possibility of motor involvement didn't matter and that irritating 'locking' switch was OUT OF THE WAY!!!
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On Friday, April 24, 2015 at 11:16:30 AM UTC-4, Jlynn Littleberry wrote: .

The chance that anyone here has that exact model is near zero. The online parts suppliers typically have parts diagrams that can give you an idea of how it's put together, how it may come apart, etc.
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On Fri, 24 Apr 2015 08:16:24 -0700 (PDT), Jlynn Littleberry

Wow, that is a far cry from the Whirlpool of 1975. Then they had a Whirlpool Cool Line, and they had an 800 number staffed by real technicians, guys and one gal who had actually been repairmen. It was open until 8 or 9 at night at least 5 days a week. And when I was dealing with them, they never said, Call a repairman.
I had found a Whirlpool on he street, and I borrowed the super's handtruck or dolly and took it home (Only 1 step to the door and 4 more steps from the lobby to the elevator.
After 3 small repairs** it worked fine for years, but then we didn't use it for several months and it wouldn't agitate. I talked to at least 3 of them, and they explained how to unscrew the big white plastic cap at the top of the agitator unscrew the bolt htere, and (try to) pulll out the agitator. When that was stuck and nothing I did could free it, I think one said a repairman wouldn't have any better luck.
**1) The lid switch that I mentioned. 2) It wouldn't fill, but that was only because of small stones clogging the input screen. 3) Rust on the top part (that holds the lid). I sprayed it with Epox-ee white and it looked as hard and as nice as the original finish. Right now I can't believe I used spray pain t indoors but I also don't think I could have removed the lid, because of all the wires. And if they unplugged, I can't remember where I would have taken the top to paint it.

Maybe yours is newer than either of mine. I don't know when the style changed.

Did it spring back?

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Mickey asks, "did it spring back?"
No, but it hadn't moved even a teeny bit - the top of the washer seems rigi dly affixed to the sides and front panels. I am thinking those obstruction s are either bolts or large brads that keep the top permanently attached to the sides and front. What happened was the metal along the bottom rim of the top bent in (deformed as when hail dents your car roof) and I quit tryi ng - it was apparant to me that all I was doing was deforming the top porti on of the shell. And that slight deformation is still there, but, unless you are looking for it, you won't notice it since it is on the underside rim of the top panel, and only about 1/4" in size - it also didn't scrap the porcelin because I quit when I saw what was happening.
We have been having heavy rains here for three days and I haven't been able to get the washing machine out to where I can get a really good look at it all the way around. Tomorrow is a sunny day here in the Dallas metroplex and I am going to drag it out onto the driveway and do whatever I have to d o to get that dang top off - I am thinking I'll have to do like in that vid eo, remove the console (find those pesky screws holding the console on), an d then unscrew some hidden screws that will be exposed once the console is removed, and then the whole shell (top, sides, and front) will come off as a unit, leaving the guts of the washing machine out in the open. Then I ca n see that nagging lid switch and decide what I want to do about it.
I went to a repair shop today in a local small town and they had those bump ers for $2 each, so, I went ahead and bought them. I told the repairman th ere I was having trouble getting the top off, and he suggested I use a putt y knife, but when I told him I'd tried that and it wouldn't budge, he acted like he was oh so busy and suggested he'd have to come out for a "service call" to get the top off. I am realizing that repairmen only get paid when they can come out and bill you for a call, so they just don't want to tell any of their "trade" secrets. Well, I ain't gonna' pay no hundred dollars when all I need is a bit of information and I can do it myself. I'll figu re it out tomorrow come hell or high water.
Thanks for the replies - I'll make it a point to update this thread when I finally get that top off - seems like some folks here might be interested.
Peace.
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