Which saw to buy

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I am going to be building a small closet from 2x4s and other wood pieces. Perhaps covering it with a veneer. What type of saw do I need? Im thinking a mitre saw would be good. I don't relly have a cutting surface so I likely need one of those too.
Ill be cutting these 2x4s, probably some trim pieces as well.
I bought a table saw last year when I was building a jungle gym in the backyard. That was seriously the wrong saw to buy...Don't want to make that mistake again. Im gonna sell the table saw too.
I am not even a hobbiest and only do work when I must. I have a Black & Decker firestorm 24v cordless hammer drill and I love it! Just want to give you an idea of my 'tool class.'
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CL Gilbert
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CL (dnoyeB) Gilbert wrote:

I suggest a hand saw. They work really well and are cordless.
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Joseph Meehan

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Joseph Meehan wrote:

Sorry, I'm married and no longer posses the hand strength to operate such a device...
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CL (dnoyeB) Gilbert wrote:

My suggestion was serious.
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Joseph Meehan

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Joseph Meehan wrote:

Seriously. I prefer not to use a hand saw. I find them less accurate. I like my work to look nice eventhough I am not a professional. I have hand saw and miter box now. But I just can't be arsed to saw 2x4s with a hand saw. For instance, I use the black and decker for screwing in screws whereas I could use a screw driver.
Is there some reason you think a hand saw would be good?
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CL (dnoyeB) Gilbert wrote:

The are not expensive, easy to store and when you learn how, do a better job than most people do with their power saws. Even without a miter box, if you know what you are doing, you can do more accurate cuts than most people can do with their fancy power saws. It is a shame that so few people bother to learn how to use one properly.
Sure most professionals use power saws, but then own several so they have the one that fits the job and then need to do production work.
I am not against power equipment, I have some myself and I use them, but most of the time, a hand saw could do the same job. and it takes up far less room.
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If he's going to buy only one saw, then cutting veneer properly with a hand saw takes a lot of practice.

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Bob wrote:

I agree, but it is a skill worth learning.
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Joseph Meehan

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Why do you go on? The man has already explained what happened to his hand strength. LOL thanks CL
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On 2006-01-24 16:46:14 -0500, "CL (dnoyeB) Gilbert"

Then use your table saw. Cabinet-grade carpentry!
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Buy a circular saw. They come in both corded and cordless. Besides the blade they normally come with, you'll probably need a fine tooth blade for cutting the veneer. If you don't need the space, keep the table saw. In a couple of years, you might be sorry you sold it. Buy a couple of do-it-yourself book also.

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I'd get something like a low end Delta 10" mitre saw plus a small low end cabinet saw. And, by "cabinet" saw, I mean a small 4" or 6" bladed circular saw, not one of the magnificient cabinet saws by Delta or others. Go to the New Yankee Workshop web page and take a look at the small cabinet saw Norm uses. They are worth their weight in gold for ease of use etc. I have one of the monster DeWalts (12" industrial) and even though I use it just about every day, it still wears me out. And I do 36 rep curls with a 40 lb dumbell every other day.
jc
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J.C. wrote:

Ok, I'll consider that 2nd saw. The Delta is not too expeisive is it? Ill be using this thing no more than twice a year probably.
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I bought a brand new one (mitre saw I assume you are referring to) for $79.00 at Home Depot the other day.
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Miter saw is just the ticket for at 2 x 4's and for trim. More important than the saw is the blade. Better blades cut smoother for the finished work. The blade it comes with is fine for the framing. You can get away with a cheap $99 saw if that is the extent of your work, but if you plan to do woodworking in the future, look at a DeWalt for about $230 to $300. Miter saw is nice if yo have visions of doing a laminate or pre-finished wood floor also.

No, don't sell it yet. You may need that for cutting the covering for the outside. You do need to support the work properly to be safe with that type of saw, but if you have to rip and 8' board, it is the best tool for the job. If you have to cut 2" off the end of a 2 x 4, it is the worst tool for the job.
Cutting sheet goods with a table saw is easy if you have a large table to support the work both infeed, and outfeed. With no support, it will be dangerous handling a large sheet of paneling or plywood.
Barring that, A circular saw, straight edge that can be clamped in place, and a sheet of styrofoam does a good job. Put the foam board on the flat floor. Put the panel to be cut on top of it. Clamp a straight-edge in place. Now, adjust the saw blade to take just a shallow cut through the wood and let the foam be sacrificial and cut a groove into it along the way. The work is well supported, the saw will be straight against the guide, and good carbide blade will make a pretty smooth cut.
Circular saw can also be used for the framing, but it does take a little time to get the finesse to make a perfect straight cut every time.
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I'd suggest a 10" compound miter saw. Others won't agree, but I bought a cheapie Pro-Tech 10" compound miter saw about 4 years ago, and it's been a fine tool.
The fancy Dewalt 12" compound miter or even a slider saw would have been *really* nice, but costly and overkill for what I'm doing. The Pro-Tech cuts straight and smooth, and the angles are true. It's a nice saw. With a quick google search, you will find that other people like them too.
You can get one at Menards for $79.00

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wrote:

Tho many might suggest a circular saw, it takes a lot of sawing to get accurate cuts. ( usually AFTER all the cuts have been made )
I got a DELTA $99 compound miter saw. Perfect for the average "hacker". And small enough to store in the shed when you're done.
<rj>
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I would NEVER sell my table saw. If you can not see their benefit then anything that I would suggest would be in the same category.
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SQLit wrote:

Well it seems like they are for rip cuts, whereas I do 99% cross cuts. (Note: I have no idea about proper terminology). Tablesaw was good for sheets of wood, but I almost killed myself cutting 12' 3x3s on it :(
I did not get woodworking/shop class in highschool. I dont know how to use it really.
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A lot of high schools and tech schools have evening classes. Either take a course, have a friend show you, or stop using power tools before you cut a finger off.

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