Which circuit?

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My range hood vent died recently so I decided to replace it. BUT the circuits in the breaker box are poorly marked. Just want to know if I am correct inassuming the 240 volts to the stove would not normally be somehow split to power the 120 volt range hood. Any hints on the project?
Tia
Lou
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On 1/16/2012 4:59 PM, LouB wrote:

It definitely shouldn't be connected to the range line unless the hood is an integral part of the range. If it's just a standard basic hood, it's probably on the same circuit as the lights in the kitchen, or some other lighting circuit
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Get a "voltage detector". Turn off the stove breaker, and see if the wire still beeps.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
My range hood vent died recently so I decided to replace it. BUT the circuits in the breaker box are poorly marked. Just want to know if I am correct inassuming the 240 volts to the stove would not normally be somehow split to power the 120 volt range hood. Any hints on the project?
Tia
Lou
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On 1/16/2012 3:59 PM, LouB wrote:

I often use The Jesus method to find breakers. You take a plug with a couple of lengths of insulated wire sticking out about a foot then strip a half inch of insulation off the ends of the wires then plug it in making sure the wires don't touch, yet. Hold the wires apart, turn your head, close your eyes, touch the two ends of the bare wire together and shout "JESUS!" during the resulting flash and small explosion. It's also a good way to test your circuit breakers. ^_^
TDD
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On Mon, 16 Jan 2012 16:23:12 -0600, The Daring Dufas

Does Jesus come and help? :)
No, it's NOT connected to the 240v. Either the light circuit or a nearby outlet.
If the light works in it, turn on the light and shut off breakers till it goes off.
Otherwise just shut off the house MAIN, disonnect the two wires beneath a small panel (look for a screw on a panel). Then cap the wires coming from the wall, and turn the power back on. If you want, before capping them, put a tester on those wires and turn on the power MAIN. Then turn off each breaker one by one till you find the one for that hood.
That's when you shut off the breaker and cap those wires till you repair or replace the hood.
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Some people have been known to see Jesus during such an operation.
I was working with a friend, and he was working on an overhead circuit, lighting. I asked if it would be a good idea to turn off the power. He had turned off the MAIN, or so he thought. Problem is, that the MAIN was actually the feed to the WATER HEATER, and he was working on a CIRCUIT that was live. It was DAY TIME, so I turned off the REST of the breakers. Much SAFER.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

Does Jesus come and help? :)
No, it's NOT connected to the 240v. Either the light circuit or a nearby outlet.
If the light works in it, turn on the light and shut off breakers till it goes off.
Otherwise just shut off the house MAIN, disonnect the two wires beneath a small panel (look for a screw on a panel). Then cap the wires coming from the wall, and turn the power back on. If you want, before capping them, put a tester on those wires and turn on the power MAIN. Then turn off each breaker one by one till you find the one for that hood.
That's when you shut off the breaker and cap those wires till you repair or replace the hood.
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On Mon, 16 Jan 2012 19:02:12 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

I should know better than to use that name with you around here..... :) However, if someone grabs both wires they might see him in living color (Panavision)!!!

The Main should ALWAYS be labelled "MAIN" Personally I label all breakers, even if it dont list every outlet, at least some sort of idea what that one is for. But an electrician MUST label the main. Not sure if code requires it, but breaker boxes always come with the labels, it's not hard to stick em' on.
Sometimes a panel contains TWO or more Mains too....
What I had problems with were old buildings that had multiple apartments, and were originally just large single homes. In those you never know what meter/panel is feeding which apartment. When I worked for a rental company and had to service these places, they were a nightmare. One tenant would be paying 90% of the bill and the others paid the rest. Of course the owners didn't want to pay to rewire, so I just had to swap around wires as best as I could. I knew better than to touch any wire without putting a tester on it first. Yet, there were several times that the sparks would come flying out of a box because of old dried up insulation and the power from the wrong apt.
Then there was the drug addict who laid in bed shooting holes in the ceiling with a handgun (because of flys on the ceiling). Shot right thru a BX cable up in the attic, not to mention the holes in the roof. The idiot started shooting while I was there to fix that BX. I left. Told the owner to call me back when the guy was in prison. (I did not turn the power back on when I left either). That night the cops hauled him away. Then I fixed the wiring, and he had to reroof the place too. Amazing how stupid some people are....
I was glad to quit that job. All the properties were ghetto houses.
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Living color..... RED!
Wow, that's got to have been a rough job, doing electric with that kind of tenants. I'm sure you've had many more experiences which were every bit as miserable.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
wrote:>Some people have been known to see Jesus during such an operation.

I should know better than to use that name with you around here..... :) However, if someone grabs both wires they might see him in living color (Panavision)!!!

The Main should ALWAYS be labelled "MAIN" Personally I label all breakers, even if it dont list every outlet, at least some sort of idea what that one is for. But an electrician MUST label the main. Not sure if code requires it, but breaker boxes always come with the labels, it's not hard to stick em' on.
Sometimes a panel contains TWO or more Mains too....
What I had problems with were old buildings that had multiple apartments, and were originally just large single homes. In those you never know what meter/panel is feeding which apartment. When I worked for a rental company and had to service these places, they were a nightmare. One tenant would be paying 90% of the bill and the others paid the rest. Of course the owners didn't want to pay to rewire, so I just had to swap around wires as best as I could. I knew better than to touch any wire without putting a tester on it first. Yet, there were several times that the sparks would come flying out of a box because of old dried up insulation and the power from the wrong apt.
Then there was the drug addict who laid in bed shooting holes in the ceiling with a handgun (because of flys on the ceiling). Shot right thru a BX cable up in the attic, not to mention the holes in the roof. The idiot started shooting while I was there to fix that BX. I left. Told the owner to call me back when the guy was in prison. (I did not turn the power back on when I left either). That night the cops hauled him away. Then I fixed the wiring, and he had to reroof the place too. Amazing how stupid some people are....
I was glad to quit that job. All the properties were ghetto houses.
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On 1/16/2012 4:48 PM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

I forgot, you can get a light bulb socket adapter to plug in your two prong electrical plug. ^_^
TDD
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I wonder how many people went to check, see who was at the door?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
One of my favorite testers was just a simple socket with pigtail wires. I put two insulated alligator clips on the wires, and kept a small lightbulb in it. Just clip it on the wires and watch it while flipping the breakers. The only problem was that sometimes I could not see the light, so I made another one by mounting a doorbell and transformer on a board, with alligator clips on a wire. (no push button). Clip it on the wire and flip breakers till the bell starts sounding. It was a loud bell so I could hear it from other floors in the bldg. Radios work too if you're just doing outlets!!!
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Real electricians just use a six inch length of 14 gage insulated wire, bent into U shape, and ends stripped.
One real electrician I saw, used a length of plug and wire, work box, and a BIG push button.
Doubt that Tia's range hood has a socket to use.
The Jesus method works less well, on FPE Stablock panels, where it is also the WTF method, as your wire melts in your hand. My neighbor found out that his FPE Stablock panel didn't turn off the water heater power, when he turned off the water heater breaker.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I often use The Jesus method to find breakers. You take a plug with a couple of lengths of insulated wire sticking out about a foot then strip a half inch of insulation off the ends of the wires then plug it in making sure the wires don't touch, yet. Hold the wires apart, turn your head, close your eyes, touch the two ends of the bare wire together and shout "JESUS!" during the resulting flash and small explosion. It's also a good way to test your circuit breakers. ^_^
TDD
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On 1/16/2012 5:59 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I never stick a shorting wire into an outlet because the arc can damage the internal contact surfaces inside the outlet leading to a bad connection. Real electricians know this. o_O
TDD
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On Mon, 16 Jan 2012 18:11:21 -0600, The Daring Dufas

That's right. They use their fingers, which won't melt.

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wrote:

Any electrican worth his salt carries a voltage detector in his shirt pocket. An NE2 bulb in a little plastic case with 2 leads on it. Stick the leeds into a plug, or touch a wire, and touch the other lead with your pinkie. If it lights, it's live. If it doesn't, it's dead.. And set up a shotgun aimed at the panel to get any stupid bugger that turns a breaker back on (if you don't have a physical lock-out)
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An electrician friend pulled a power meter to a church. While working on the wiring, he was shocked very bad. Went out side and someone had put the meter back in the meter base.
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wrote:

Sounds like your electrician friend was too trusting...
Should have locked the meter in his truck while working on the power OR stationed someone at the meter base to prevent someone from re- energizing the circuit while the work was being performed...
Probably was a bad idea to leave the meter socket uncovered as part of it remains energized at all times unless the service drop is disconnected and whomever was dumb enough to put the meter back in the base could have touched the live parts inside and gotten hurt on your friend's dime as he left energized electrical equipment open where anyone could have wandered over to touch it, but then again this is why contractors are required to have liability insurance coverage...
~~ Evan
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<Sounds like your electrician friend was too trusting...>
The guy who put it back in probably thought some pranksters had removed it. But electricians and elevator mechanics eventually learn to put up big, "OUT OF SERVICE" signs if they still want to buy liability insurance at affordable (or ANY) rates. Business insurers have been very active at either removing or "rating" customers that have a history of safety issues.
<Should have locked the meter in his truck while working on the power OR stationed someone at the meter base to prevent someone from re-energizing the circuit while the work was being performed...>
If he lived, he'll probably never do it again.
<Probably was a bad idea to leave the meter socket uncovered as part of it remains energized at all times unless the service drop is disconnected and whomever was dumb enough to put the meter back in the base could have touched the live parts inside and gotten hurt on your friend's dime as he left energized electrical equipment open where anyone could have wandered over to touch it, but then again this is why contractors are required to have liability insurance coverage...>
Insurance, but not smarts. There were a number of serious violations that happened in this case which produced a very bad outcome.
-- Bobby G.
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On Mon, 16 Jan 2012 22:26:06 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

That is why OSHA requires a lock out tag. I can't imagine what the guy was thinking when he put it back in.
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"Hey, look! That meter thingie fell out of the box. Or them kids were messing around. In either case, I'd better put it back."
(Ought to be some way to cover the meter hole, so people don't touch the hot wires. And put the meter in your vehicle, lock the door.)
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
wrote:>

That is why OSHA requires a lock out tag. I can't imagine what the guy was thinking when he put it back in.
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On 1/17/2012 7:24 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

yes, it's called duct tape and a magic marker. duh. or take the meter with you. I had the power company want to charge me for 20 kw/h one month on a house we had up in the air putting a new foundation under it. I told them on the phone, "hey you better try again, I pulled that meter 6 weeks ago and it's in my truck". They had also come out and disconnected the drop at the pole. They cancelled the bill.
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
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