Where to buy 15 ft 3.5" OD pole?

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I'm putting up a satellite dish and I need a 12' 3.5" OD pole, would Home Depot sell this? I don't want to go to a plumbing store, $$$. I called some places in the phone book under scrap metal and they said they had nothing like that. Any ideas?
Thanks Mike
btw I'm in the DC area
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Are you sure it is 3.5", my dish is mounted on 1.5" galvanized iron pipe (available at most good sized hardware stores). If that is what you're looking for, then yes Home Depot should have it (check in the fence section, chain link pole)
Happy hunting.

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Sorry, should of mentioned it's a 3.1 meter TVRO dish..
John Sullivan wrote:

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Okay, it's a 10ft dish. So again I ask, why the 12' height?

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Michael Baugh wrote:

No kidding. Hey original poster: Is there going to be any shielding behind it up there??? Preferrably, the only thing hitting your LNB/LNC should be what's bouncing off of the dish. They *really* work better with something like a building or a hillside behind that dish, not free air (and stray RF).
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The real Tom Pendergast [ So if you meet me, have some courtesy,
aka I-zheet M'drurz [ have some sympathy, and some taste.
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Did you see the type of dish he has? Yes, he need a large strong pole.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

No he doesn't. He should put the dish on the ground. Do you think 12 feet out of 24,000 miles is going to make any difference?
Besides, putting a ten-foot circle of metal twelve feet in the air is a disaster waiting for a victim.
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It wont be 12' in the air. At least 4' should be in the ground. Then he has to reach to the center of a 10' dish. That sucks up about 9' already. There could be another reason to lift it another couple of feet to clear a rock or something.
Done right, it will not be a disaster.
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I used to use my 10' dish as a UHF antenna, with a bowtie in place of the LNA. Got extremely good distance reception. But my question of why so high still hasn't been answered. This is a repair group. You know that whatever gets put up will need some tinkering. So why put it up any higher than to clear the ground? True, there may be horses, kids, whatever that need to have it above them. That's fine. But why a 10' instead of 18", and why so high? Inquiring minds want to know.

has
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

For me, it would be 3' of snow.

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How's he going to point it at the satellite when it is laying on the ground? The flattest elevation angle in the mid-latitudes is 49 degrees for a bird that's at the same longitude in the Clarke belt as the ground location, and gets steeper toward either end of the arc. The lower lip of the dish must clear the ground at minimum beam elevation (dish 90 degrees to the Earth's surface) in order to cover the entire arc.
That means the mount point must be more than 5 feet above ground level for a 10 foot dish. But that's not enough if he wants to maintain a reasonable antenna noise temperature. To do that, the major dish sidelobes must clear all terrestrial obstructions.
In flat terrain without a raised horizon, and assuming a typical 2 degree half angle for the first major dish sidelobe, that means the bottom edge of the dish needs to be at least 3 feet above ground level. For rougher terrain, or locations where there are far field obstructions (buildings, trees, etc) out toward the horizon, the dish will need to be higher.
So *at minimum* he needs a mount pole that sticks 8 feet out of the ground. A 12 foot pole lets him do that, with 4 feet set in concrete in the ground to resist the overturning moment.

That's why he needs a heavy pole. 3.5 inch diameter pipe is actually a bit on the light side for this size dish. I have my "small" 12 foot dish mounted on 6 inch pipe. The larger one (a 10m Scientific Atlanta dish) is mounted on a 24 inch diameter heavy wall steel pedestal designed for the dish.
The overturning moment on medium to large size dishes is very high in even moderate winds. My big dish needs a mount capable of withstanding over 250,000 foot-pounds in a 50 MPH wind. You need a well engineered reinforced concrete base to withstand the forces, and a heavy enough pole to avoid bending under the load.
BTW, as a source of pipe for the pole, I'm using 6 inch oilfield well casing, aquired as free scrap from a friend in the business, for my small dish. The pedestal mount for the larger dish was custom fabricated by Scientific Atlanta, and came with the dish. There's 7 yards of concrete in the base.
Gary
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vaguely proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
remove ns from my header address to reply via email
OOI, and PMFJI
Is there any reason not to use a pyramid tower made up of smaller poles, to give a nice spread base? Most windage is overcome this way. ***************************************************** Have you noticed that people always run from what they _need_ toward what they want?????
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Maybe you can tell why, nowadays, a 10' dish for TVRO?

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Michael Baugh wrote:

Ability to receive C-band. (Dish and DirecTV are Ku-band)
--
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aka I-zheet M'drurz [ have some sympathy, and some taste.
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< snip >
C Band TVRO is TOTALLY different than DBS satellite TV. DBS (Dish, DirecTV) is a prepacked set of channels designed to appeal to the largest audience. C Band is a totally different beast; you get to decide which of the hundreds (when you include audio services, thousands) of channels to watch (listen) to. DBS didn't, and never could, replace C Band. For the "average" person, DBS is the right answer. But then again, the average person doesn't machine metal, either.
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C band performance during rain fade, or for receiving satellites near the ends of the visible arc. A 6 footer just won't cut it in those cases, you need the greater gain.
While lots of people just subscribe to the packaged Ku band DBS feeds (DirecTV, Dish Network, etc) which only require a fixed 18 inch dish, there's much more out there to be found on C band (also a lot to be found on Ku band that an 18 inch dish won't pick up). I can receive raw back haul feeds from news and sporting events, foreign TV from European satellites low on my horizon, some commercial, government, and military closed circuit feeds, etc.
Much of it isn't interesting, some is. One of my favorite TV shows comes from TV Dubai. It is in Arabic, so I don't understand what they say, but I know what it is. I've dubbed it Arabian Bandstand because it is a direct ripoff of the old American Bandstand show. The host even resembles Dick Clark, with a moustache. They play older American rock and roll, with the lyrics redubbed in Arabic. It is a hoot.
I used my bigger dish to follow the Clementine probe to the Moon. I was getting the raw data same as NASA was. That was cool, and once I whipped up some decoding software, allowed me to crosscheck what they were posting on the web about what it was discovering.
Even my bigger dish can't receive the signals from the Mars rovers, but technical advances, and the higher power missions planned for the future, should one day make signals from Mars receivable on my setup. (I did follow Mars Express out to 4 million miles before I lost the signal.)
I suppose the real answer to why a large dish is *because I can*. In a way it is like, why listen to shortwave radio? There are a lot more voices out there than just the formula pap fed to us here.
Gary
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At the time I responded, he only said he was mounting a satellite dish, without mentioning the size of it. The dish I was picturing was the small oval type supplied for services such as DirecTV and such.
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John Sullivan wrote:

Never assume anything from a first post. It usually takes 3 or more follow-up posts from the OP before you can assume anything. By the 5th or 6th follow-up, you may actually have enough information to offer a suggestion/solution/link. :-)
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pipe
I thought he asked a perfectly good question, it was the responses that were all over the place! FWIW: All big dishes use 3 inch schedule 40 pipe (at least those from 6 foot to 12 foot). I just had to buy some myself, and it is about $10 a foot, from a metal supply place.
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