What wiring codes say about these wires?

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HI DanG, I will probably back out from this plan seeing that it might be dangerous. By the way, you mentioned 3-phase with high leg. What did you mean by this? I am pretty certain these are used for the fluorescent lamps, because the other wires and panels are hooked up to fluorescent ones. I don't know why this one is just lying around, unhooked, maybe its for future expansions? I had wanted to hook it up so I can use a vacuum cleaner and such. Maybe I opt to go with a cordless vacuum cleaner and scrap this plan since its obviously too involved.
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There is a particular type of three phase service called a "Delta", where two of the three legs will give you 120 volt to neutral, but the third leg, called the wild leg, high leg, delta leg, or red leg, gives a much higher voltage to neutral and is not used in single phase applications
wrote:

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wrote:

May be 480 Wye using 277 volt fluorescent fixtures...
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The OP doesn't really make it clear if this is a house, apt, or commercial building, so anything is possible
wrote:

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This is in a 30 year old apartment building. I rent a unit on the 5th floor of a 7 story building. :-) In any case I thought it was a simple thing, but I guess its not and I am better off not touching it. :)

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And that's the end of the story -- it's not your building.
First, your lease almost certainly prohibits you from making modifications without the landlord's explicit consent.
Second, in most jurisdictions it is against the law for anyone but a licensed electrician to modify premises wiring in an apartment building.
Third, I mean no offense, but it's clear that you don't know what you're doing. If you screw up the wiring in your own single-family house, you're jeopardizing only your own safety and that of your family. Screw up the wiring on a 7-story apartment building, and you're placing dozens or hundreds of lives at risk. Leave it alone.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Sun, 13 May 2007 19:52:51 -0400, "RBM" <rbm2(remove

Actually, single phase applications are the only reason a high leg exists.
If it were all 3 phase loads there would be no high leg.
I know it is more than the OP wants to know, but http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_leg_delta
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wrote:

I should have said that the 190V leg is not used in the single phase applications, but the need for single phase applications is the only reason the high leg is a factor.
That sounds a little more like I know what I am talking about, but not much. :)
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Are you saying if I put a voltmeter across each of these 3 legs I will measure 120volts? By the way which one is Neutral and which is 120V (red?) ?? I think for single phase use you only need one of the 120V lead right?

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Joseph wrote:

Ground is green. From an old article title, "black is hot and white is not (and vice is often versa)". I never found rules for other colors, but in my experience I've found a lot of switched hot wires used red.
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When I put up ceiling fans, I found they had blue wires. There were hot wires for the light kit, allowing wiring to separate switches.
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Mark Lloyd
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I could do that BUT you have no idea who will pay for the power, what breaker somewhere it on, it may not have power at all. you might cause troubles for others, its likely a 220V line.
What tools will you be sing in the garage?
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http://www.geocities.com/corvette_2050/connector1.JPGhttp://www.geocities.com/corvette_2050/connector2.JPG
I could do that BUT you have no idea who will pay for the power, what breaker somewhere it on, it may not have power at all. you might cause troubles for others, its likely a 220V line.
What tools will you be sing in the garage?
If you are renting the garage space, do NOT mess with the wiring without talking to landlord. The already-mentioned safety issues aside, landlords tend to get real pissed off when stuff like that happens. Like considering it a lease-breaker, and putting your ass and/or car on the street, if the garage is part of an apartment lease. If you have a nice landlord, and ask real nice, they may have an actual electrician run an outlet as a courtesy to you and any other tenants, but just as likely their insurance agent will be happier if they don't, so some fool doesn't leave a space heater running while he tracks down that fuel line leak in January.
aem sends...
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Do you have 3 phase power? er.....sorry Do you know where your panel is? Do you know what a panel is?
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wrote:

I think the blue wire is for patriotism.
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It's an interesting project. I'd be thinking to trace the wires back, and see where they go. That will help give you information on how to wire the outlet end.
It sounds, though, that you should hire an electrician.
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Christopher A. Young
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Joseph wrote:

Odd photos.
All appear to come into the box in an armored cable. Looks sort of BX ish, but the BX I know is black, white and bare copper ground, if there is a ground. Old code sometimes allowed BX armored sheath as a ground. It wasnt a good ground as the amored sheah could corrode, break, and then no ground.
In photos of the box are insilated wires in black, red, blue, white with a red tracer thread, and a bare copper.
The bare copper is grounded to the box with a screw.
In US household wiring, conventional wisdom would suspect black and red being separate 120 hot legs; blue is also used in conduit as a third color for a hot leg. Its also used *inside* a fluorescent fixture or one of the high frequency legs.
A plain white *should be* a neutral. What a white with a red tracer thread is I have no idea.
I wouldn't touch this with a 10 foot pole.
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On Sun, 13 May 2007 17:44:51 -0700, jJim McLaughlin

I thought they did something like that when they used the same cable for 2 circuits with their own neutral wires. That would be needed if they used GFCI breakers.
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Mark Lloyd
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On Mon, 14 May 2007 12:31:41 -0500, Mark Lloyd

The only reason to mark the white would be if it had two whites.
It could be, like you say, two single phase circuits.
It looks like 3 phase to me, but who knows without checking?
There are no missing knockouts in the box. It looks like a circuit that has never been used. It could be that or they removed something and put a box on the end.
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