What to do with 4 Digital Satellite Receivers (forclosed home came with them)

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On Sun, 3 Jan 2010 15:33:19 -0600, HeyBub wrote:

Good point. I think I can mount the antenna on the water tank which is the highest point on the hill anyway that's still my property.
Since I need 123 degrees, 7 degrees, and 141 degrees, I assumed I need a motor that at least moves the antenna 180 degrees.
I looked up the DB8 antenna which gives 15.8 dB of "gain" but I can't tell how many dBs I need from the information that I currently have.
What number on the FCC site for reception tells me what gain I need from the antenna or amplifier?
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Donna DeLong wrote:

You're STILL thinking terrestrial TV. Forget "high."
You can mount a satellite antenna BELOW GROUND LEVEL (as long as it can see the right part of the sky).
Here's a disguise kit to make your antenna look like a ROCK in the FLOWER BED!
(Scroll down to "Need to Hide Your Dish?") http://www.gradys.com /

Not exactly. The antenna has to move in two directions: Azimuth and elevation (left/right & up/down). Think naval guns on a warship. You can get motorized mounts that, once programmed, can swivel the whole contraption to the right position.
They ain't cheap.
The process does, however, cut down on channel-surfing since it takes as much as a minute to reorient the antenna.
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HeyBub wrote:

Pay attention- she is giving up on get satt TV, and is trying for OTA terrestrial stations. She either needs a big yagi with a rotator, or maybe some tuned antennas and a switch box.
-- aem sends...
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On Sun, 03 Jan 2010 20:12:39 -0500, aemeijers wrote:

I'm confused about the Yagi.
Based on prior suggestions for a "DB8", I researched DB8s and found that the DB8 is mostly a UHF antenna (so it will pull in PBS and CBS) but I would need additional 2-foot halfwave dipoles for the VHF channels (NBC and FOX) that are in my area.
But is the DB8 the same as a "Yagi"?
Looking up the Yagi (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yagi_antenna), I see a Yagi is a highly directional high-gain antenna - so I understand why it might work for me given a rotator to get the 3 compass headings I need (6-8 degrees for NBC and CBS, 123 degrees for PBS, & 141 degrees for FOX).
But (from Wikipedia) isn't the Yagi mostly for VHF? And, if I understood the DB8, isn't it mostly for UHF?
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On Sun, 03 Jan 2010 20:12:39 -0500, aemeijers wrote:

As for tuned antennas and a switch box, are you saying I can build my own custom antenna, out of wood and wire, one antenna for each of the four or five stations that have reception in my area, and then I can just switch them with an AB switch (only it would be an ABCDE switch, I guess).
I found tuned antenna-building tutorials here and it seems easy enough to build one for each station: http://www.tvantennaplans.com / http://www.instructables.com/id/How_to_make_a_fractal_antenna_for_HDTV_DTV_plus_
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y0m6AfR-9As

Do you have a suggestion for the 5 tuned antennas and the switch box to handle the five stations? - PBS UHF Strong (KTEH, Analog channel 54-1, Digital channel 50) - CBS UHF Strong (KION, Analog channel 46-1, Digital channel 32) - NBC HiV Medium (KSBW, Analog channel 08-1, Digital channel 08) - FOX HiV Medium (KCBA, Analog channel 35-1, Digital channel 13) - ABC HiV Weak (KXTV, Analog channel 10-1, Digital channel 10)
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On Sun, 3 Jan 2010 13:39:54 -0800, Donna DeLong

Any reason you can't watch TV on your computer? I had and lost a link for many shows. You do have a PC and can select and watch what you like.
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Oren wrote:

Uh, if she is out in the boonies, how is she getting broadband? 768 DSL makes video barely tolerable. 384 or dialup, forget it.
-- aem sends...
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wrote:

Not sure what she has. She can "mount the antenna on the water tank which is the highest point on the hill.."
Until we know her broadband I'll wait.
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On Sun, 03 Jan 2010 21:01:43 -0500, aemeijers wrote:

You guessed it. There is no cable or DSL up here in the mountains so it would be useful to pluck "regular" TV right out of the air (just like in the olden days).
The only wires or pipes that come up the road into the house are the telephone and electricity. Even that stinks as the telephone is scratchy and the electricity goes out often and the 14Kw Generac motor kicks in all the time.
Still, if TV can be had on the web, I should at least test it out. I found, for example, "60 Minutes" on the web, but, these don't seem as much OTA TV as they are utubish-like videos of a previous broadcast. http://www.tvadio.com/tv-channel/60-Minutes-Full-Episodes.aspx
I wonder two things about web-based OTA TV: 1. Is the web tv station the SAME broadcast as the OTA stations? 2. What's the best URL for the basic OTA stations (ABC, CBS, NBC, Discovery, History, PBS, etc.)?
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Donna DeLong wrote:

Try Hulu TV, NinjaVideo and Fast Pass TV.
http://www.hulu.com /
http://www.ninjavideo.net/index.php
http://www.fastpasstv.com /
TDD
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Donna DeLong wrote:

Discovery and History are NOT OTA stations, they are cable/satt only. You can buy or rent CDs of particular programs or series shown on those stations, however. Some people who aren't into sports and such report replacing their satt or cable with a Netflix subscription, and being perfectly happy.
-- aem sends...
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On Mon, 04 Jan 2010 17:54:50 -0500, aemeijers wrote:

I think the answer is as follows based on a summary of what I've learned.
1. The 4 satellite boxes are fundamentally useless for my needs 2. The 2 satellite dishes are also basically just as useless for me 3. What is useful is the existing cabling from the dishes to the rooms 4. Repurposing the dish antennas as WiFi or OTA TV isn't worth the effort 5. Netflix ($8/month for 1 DVD, $15/month for 3 DVDs) is one movie option 6. However if news or networks are desired, than TV is the way to go 7. Web-based TV (Hulu, Ninja & Fast Pass TV) work only with broadband 8. FTA TV has limited programming & comparable hardware cost to DirecTV 9. OTA TV has one-time investment in a yagi or DB8, plus a motor & preamp 10. Cost for OTA TV is about $250 ($150 antenna, $50 motor, $50 preamp) 11. Mounting on the highest part of the property will work (water tank) 12. Four OTA stations will be received well (PBS, CBS, NBC, FOX) - PBS UHF Strong (KTEH, Analog channel 54-1, Digital channel 50) - CBS UHF Strong (KION, Analog channel 46-1, Digital channel 32) - NBC HiV Medium (KSBW, Analog channel 08-1, Digital channel 08) - FOX HiV Medium (KCBA, Analog channel 35-1, Digital channel 13)
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On Sun, 03 Jan 2010 17:20:31 -0800, Oren wrote:

I didn't know that OTA broadcast TV was on the web.
Googling, I found a few web-tv "stations" that seemed to work: MSNBC News: http://wwitv.com/tv_channels/b2714.htm Fox News: http://wwitv.com/tv_channels/b5202.htm But others like CNN didn't seem to work at all: CNN News: http://edition.cnn.com/video/flashLive/live.html?stream=stream1
Yet others, like CBS news, required additional software (TVUPlayer?): http://wwitv.com/tv_channels/b4119.htm
But maybe I'm looking at the wrong urls.
Two questions: 1. Are these web stations the SAME as the OTA broadcasts? 2. What's the best URL for web-based TV for the standard networks? (eg, PBS, NBC, ABC, History channel, Discovery channel, etc)
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I think newer receivers don't use "cards" anymore,they have the access chip built right into them,to prevent "hacking". ISTR reading something about that.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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On Sun, 03 Jan 2010 12:20:35 -0600, Jim Yanik wrote:

Based on the information in this thread, I've given up on using the 2 DirecTV dish antennas or the 4 satellite receivers for anything other than scrap.
I'm going to concentrate on figuring out how to find the right TV antenna.
To that end, I think it's appropriate that this thread end as I try to ascertain what antenna to get to pluck OTA signals out of the air. I think the tv groups might be more appropriate at this point.
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Put them on CRAIGSLIST in the FREE section. Someone that can use them will come and get them
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