What's a good way to get rid of rain surface rust on tools left outside

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Thanks for mucking up the entire post here, babbling Burnie; however, I was thinking about Charlie Brown at the time.
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If you tell me you are "Sat on your ass", I don't know whether you are an idle fellow or the owner of a donkey.
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On Sat, 23 Feb 2013 09:25:42 -0800, "THE COLONEL"

Are you insisting on a hyfen between the second and thrid words? It's pretty clear without it.
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Give us a few decades; we probably will.

Feh. AEU has manhandled it so far.
Dr. Hot"with kid gloves?"Salt
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wrote:

Give us a few decades; we probably will.

Feh. AEU has manhandled it so far.
What the hell is "feh"?
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On 2/23/2013 3:49 AM, Danny D. wrote:

"Sulfur" isn't Greek. "Phosphor" is.
¬R
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harry;3018804 Wrote: >

I don't know who said that Coca Cola contains phosphoric acid, but that's not true. If it were, Coca Cola would taste acidic all of the time, but it doesn't. In fact, it's easy to remove the acidic "bite" from the taste of Coca Cola.
Coca Cola (and all carbonated soft drinks) contain an acid called "carbonic acid". They don't actually put carbonic acid in soft drinks. They only put CO2 into the soft drink and the CO2 dissolves in the soft drink and combines with H2O to form carbonic acid: CO2 + H2O CH2O3, which is carbonic acid.
[image:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c4/Carbonic-acid-2D.svg/100px-Carbonic-acid-2D.svg.png ]
Carbonic acid is an inherently unstable molecule and breaks down to form CO2 and H2O fairly quickly, but as long as there's lots of CO2 dissolved in water, carbonic acid will form as quickly as it breaks down, and that water will remain acidic cuz of the carbonic acid in it.
It's the formation of carbonic acid from the CO2 dissolved in the water that gives Coca Cola (and all carbonated soft drinks, and beer, and all carbonated (aka: "sparkling") wines their acidic "bite" when you taste them). To prove that, just leave any carbonated soft drink sitting in a glass over night to let all the CO2 come out of it. Then when you taste it, it'll just taste sweet like sugar water and not have any "bite" in it's taste at all. If there were acid in the soft drink to begin with it, that acid wouldn't evaporate, and it would still taste acidic, like vinegar left out in a glass over night.
It's the carbonic acid you swallow breaking down to form CO2 (gas) and H2O in your stomach that makes you burp after drinking soft drinks, beer or sparkling wine.
I kinda doubt that the amount of carbonic acid in a soft drink like Coke would be sufficiently strong to dissolve rust, so I'd stick with phosphoric acid which does work.
--
nestork


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On Sat, 23 Feb 2013 22:04:12 +0000, nestork

Wrong.
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_much_phosphoric_acid_is_in_a_can_of_Coke http://biology.stackexchange.com/questions/5402/is-the-amount-of-phosphoric-acid-added-to-colas-enough-to-disrupt-the-function-o
When you start with a false statement, nothing that follows is worth reading.
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Bit here on the topic. Used as food/colas additive and as a rust remover. Apparently there are different sorts. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phosphoric_acid#Uses
Another good reason not to drink Coca Cola.
Naval jelly and Coke are the same thing.
Also http://frontview.wordpress.com/2012/08/06/coca-cola-phosphoric-acid-cocaine -2/
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harry;3019314 Wrote:

I have no idea how much phosphorus there is in Coke, but phosphorus and phsphoric acid are not the same thing just like carbon and carbon dioxide are not the same thing. And, of course, a ml of water weighs very close to one gram, so in approximately 100 grams of Coca-Cola, there are 18 milligrams of phosphorus, or about eighteen one thousandths of one percent, which is a TRACE amount, hardly the primary ingredient.

No, the active ingredients in Coke are sugar and caffeine. If phosphoric acid was the active ingredient in Coke, people who like drinking Coke would enjoy drinking phosphoric acid toilet bowl cleaner diluted with water.
Think with your own head... that's why God saw fit to give you a head. Leave a glass of Coke and some phosphoric acid toilet bowl cleaner sitting over night and taste the Coke in the morning. I won't taste acidic at all. So, where did the phosphoric acid go to? The phosphoric acid toilet bowl cleaner will still taste the same and behave exactly the same in every respect as it did before.
The acidic "bite" in the taste of all soft drinks, beer, sparkling wines and soda water is due to carbonic acid. That acidity in the taste disappears as the CO2 dissipates from the beverage. That's why soft drinks go "flat" if left open too long.
Phosphoric acid toilet bowl cleaner doesn't get weaker if left out overnight.

Coke does not.
--
nestork

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On Sun, 24 Feb 2013 19:28:35 +0000, nestork

Primary? No, but it *IS* added to Coke (and Pepsi). IOW, you're wrong.

What a stupid statement. Phosphoric acid is put there for a reason. It enhances the flavor.

You must have been sleeping late that day, however.
You're *WRONG*. <more asinine arguments snipped>
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snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz;3019843 Wrote: > What a stupid statement. Phosphoric acid is put there for a reason. It > enhances the flavor.

'snopes.com: Coca-Cola Acids' (http://www.snopes.com/cokelore/acid.asp )
The 2 to 3 tenths of 1 percent phosphoric acid quoted in that Snopes web page is what's in the syrup, not in the soft drink.
Assuming a mix ratio of 5:1, one gallon of syrup will make 6 gallons of soft drink.
'How many glasses of soda does a 5 gallon bag in a box syrup yield if each glass is 16oz? - Yahoo! Answers' (http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid 100202061102AAAMnJf)
That results in a concentration of phosphoric acid in the soft drink of about 5 one hundredths of one percent.
Coca Cola can hardly be used as a substitute for phosphoric acid because it supposedly "contains phosphoric acid".
--
nestork


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Nearly all cheap soft drinks contain phosphoric acid because it is a cheap substitute for citric acid. Phosphoric acid can be manufactured cheaply to put in junk products like Coca Cola. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phosphoric_acid#Food_additive
I infer you drink/feed your kids on a lot of this shit. You need to give up and have a proper diet.
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On Mon, 25 Feb 2013 05:14:10 +0000, nestork

...and it gets taken out of the syrup before it goes in the soft drink? Did you actually think about what you wrote? (I know, impossible)

That fact is that you are *WRONG*. You can admit it now.
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snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz;3020466 Wrote: > That fact is that you are *WRONG*. You can admit it now.
I didn't do it. Nobody saw nothing. You can't prove a thing.
--
nestork


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On Mon, 25 Feb 2013 05:14:10 +0000 nestork wrote:

While I could have bought 85% phosphoric acid for less, I simply went to Home Depot and bought the Naval Jelly.
Here is the picture of some of the newly rusted tools before being pinked:

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On Mon, 25 Feb 2013 05:14:10 +0000 nestork wrote:

While I could have bought 85% phosphoric acid for less, I simply went to Home Depot and bought the Naval Jelly.
Here is the picture of some of the newly rusted tools before being pinked:

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On Mon, 25 Feb 2013 05:14:10 +0000 nestork wrote:

While I could have bought 85% phosphoric acid for less, I simply went to Home Depot and bought the Naval Jelly.
Here is the picture of some of the newly rusted tools before being pinked:

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Or once in a while, a stupid Brit.
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I haven't had a chance to try it, but Rick Dale of Ricks restoration recently said he uses apple cider vinegar to remove rust. Give it a try. Its cheap and can't hurt anything
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