What is a "secial service tool"?

Page 1 of 2  
Would you consider a torque wrench to be a special service tool even though what youre working on is not a vehicle but exercise equipment?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Uh...what are you talking about?
I'd call a "torque wrench" a "torque wrench" regardless of what I was using it on.
What is prompting this question?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If youre working on a vehicle you would expect to have a torque wrench, but would you be expected to have a torque wrench if what youre working on is not a vehicle?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A torque wrench is not "expected" based on what type of machine you are working on, a torque wrench is "expected" when the fastener that you are tightening requires a specific torque.
It doesn't matter if you are working on a "vehicle" or a toaster oven or a door handle.
If the design specs for a fastener in question calls for it to be tightened to a specific torque, then a torque wrench would be "expected".
If the instructions for a fastener on any type of device says "Tighten to 25 Nm" or "Tighten to 18.5 ft lbs" then a torque wrench would be "expected".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/5/2012 12:50 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I torque my toaster.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Apr 5, 4:29pm, gonjah <gonjah.net> wrote:

My toaster torques me.
It takes forever to toast a slice of bread and when it's done it looks like a zebra.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<<My toaster torques me. It takes forever to toast a slice of bread and when it's done it looks like a zebra.>>
A sacrilegious guy on some weird science show I was watched designed a toaster that could imprint the face of Jesus on each slice. And just because you've been doubting me so much lately <g> I went and looked him up, assuming that something like that HAD to end up on the net somewhere!
http://religion.blogs.cnn.com/2011/12/14/jesus-toasters-selling-briskly /
<<For $31.95, you dont have to wait for a miracle to see Jesus on your daily bread. Look no further than the Jesus Toaster. Divelys company, Burnt Impressions, also offers toasters that imprint images of the Virgin Mary, peace signs and pot leaves among others. Dively tells CNN affiliate WCAX right now, hes selling 50 to 100 Jesus toasters every day.>> http://www.burntimpressions.com /
For $32 it could be a great practical joke to play on an evangelic friend or relative. He's even got an Obama toaster. Too bad April 1 has passed.
--
Bobby G.





Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 5 Apr 2012 10:29:40 -0700 (PDT), Molly Brown

Depends. If torque settings are specified, you should follow them. I haven't used a torque wrench on non-auto applications, but I'm sure it's called for on things I haven't encountered. Just about every nut/bolt on a car has a torque spec. Many are needed because of expansion due to heat, and for gasket compression. Some so you don't get bearings too tight. Others are to keep you from twisting off bolts or studs, or stripping them, or breaking a flange corner. Unless you're tightening common brackets, you're best off following torque specs. My son broke 2 throttle bodies on his car before he wised up. Seemed simple enough to crank down the nuts on the studs. But if you over-torque, the cast aluminum corners with the stud holes break off, making the part useless.
--Vic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Absolutely...
Fasteners on a great many things have torque values they need to be tightened to in order for the equipment they hold together to operate properly and safely... To assume that such a tool is only useful for repairing vehicles is something that demonstrates your total unfamiliarity with any sort of real maintenance or repair operations...
~~ Evan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How much wood would a woodchuck chuck if woodchuck could chuck wood?
--
The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation
with the average voter. (Winston Churchill)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 04/05/12 5:20 PM, Larry W wrote:
...Snip...

How much ground would a groundhog grind if a groundhog could grind ground?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 05 Apr 2012 10:29:40 -0700, Molly Brown wrote:

A torque wrench is a standard item in almost any toolbox, vehicle or not.
So is a micrometer, calipers, and, dare I say, a breaker bar (or pipe).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 04/07/12 11:07 AM, Martin C. wrote:

Measure with a micrometer, mark with chalk, cut with an ax.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well "anywhere" would be a stretch.
"Two eggs over easy, a side of sausage, whole wheat toast, coffee black and a torque wrench. To go, please"
;-)
More important than where you buy one is what type you buy. A torque wrench must be sized for the application(s) it will be used for.
A beam style torque wrench with a range of 0 to 100 ft-lbs might work for some applications while a click style with a range of 0 to 200 in- lbs might be better for others.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, April 5, 2012 4:44:18 PM UTC, Molly Brown wrote:

Could be, some times things like exercise equipment are suppled with tools for assembly and adjustment but may also other user supplied tools. Without a better idea of the context of the use of the phrase this is my best guess.
Jimmie
On Thursday, April 5, 2012 4:44:18 PM UTC, Molly Brown wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 5 Apr 2012 09:44:18 -0700 (PDT), Molly Brown

Absolutely not. A torque wrench is used to tighten any threaded fastener to a specific torque. A "special service tool" is available generally only from the manufacturer of the product being serviced. A "special service tool" is only useful for the specific and possibly unique task it was designed for.
An example of a special service tool is a clutch alignment tool. It is good for only that one task... unless you need something to throw at the neighbor's cat when it gets in your garage.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/5/2012 3:25 PM, Gordon Shumway wrote:

Or shove up the.... never mind. o_O
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/5/2012 11:44 AM, Molly Brown wrote:

Ambiguous term.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Apr 5, 4:37pm, gonjah <gonjah.net> wrote:

Exercise equipment?
I agree.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/5/2012 3:51 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I was thinking "special service tool". It depends on the type of work one is doing. I didn't carry one as a sewing machine mechanic. YMMV
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.