what does an electrical rough inspection look like?

My dumbest question yet. Up to now I've assumed that for the rough inspection, the inspector wants to see all the devices connected and hanging out of the boxes, with the main breaker off. But some things I've read here make me wonder about that. Is the rough inspection supposed to happen before any devices are connected?
By implication, I'm not sure what a final inspection looks like either. I'd call the local authority and ask, but they hide their phone number carefully.
Also about pigtailing: the purpose is to allow a device to be removed without breaking continuity. Does that mean that when you remove the cap, the wires need to come apart easily? I've been twisting them together before capping them because it holds better. . .
-- "For it is only of the new one grows tired. Of the old one never tires." -- Kierkegaard, _Repetition_
James Owens, Ottawa, Canada
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You don't install the devices for the rough. The inspector is looking for the stuff you are going to cover with drywall. Prepare to be underwealmed. He may find something he doesn't like but don't expect him to be there long. YMMV but around here they are doing about 30 a day
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Greg ( snipped-for-privacy@aol.com) writes:

Thanks. Will the inspector care if some devices are connected?
-- "For it is only of the new one grows tired. Of the old one never tires." -- Kierkegaard, _Repetition_
James Owens, Ottawa, Canada
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James Owens wrote:

Common sense tells me you can't. Your job is not inspected yet and how can you put it into service? Tony
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Tony Hwang ( snipped-for-privacy@shaw.ca) writes:

Good point. My hope is that with the breaker off, and perhaps with the cable from the breaker not yet connected to the devices, I can tell the inspector I misunderstood the rough inspection requirement but he can still see the rough work. I have attachd some devices and I don't want to remove them if I don't have to.
-- "For it is only of the new one grows tired. Of the old one never tires." -- Kierkegaard, _Repetition_
James Owens, Ottawa, Canada
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One would hope that, when you file the permit, they'd be willing to explain when you're supposed to call for the next inspection..
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" snipped-for-privacy@uri.edu" ( snipped-for-privacy@uri.edu) writes:

When I called for the permit, she asked if the work was ready for inspection. I said no, I thought I needed a permit before beginning the work. She said that was true, but a lot of people didn't know!
She then informed me there would be a rough inspection and a final, but she offered no details. It was my mistake to assume I knew what they were.
-- "For it is only of the new one grows tired. Of the old one never tires." -- Kierkegaard, _Repetition_
James Owens, Ottawa, Canada
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Speaking as someone who has made that mistake once, you will probably get away with it. But the inspector will grumble. Just explain you misunderstood the "rough" bit, and stopped installing more devices once you learned otherwise.
As long as he can see easily and clearly into the boxes, and you've done a neat workmanlike job, you shouldn't have any trouble.
Unless the inspector is having a really bad day...
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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On 5 Oct 2004 15:02:24 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@FreeNet.Carleton.CA (James Owens) wrote:

The inspector will likely need to see inside the boxes to make sure cable clamps, etc. are properly applied. Some may ask you to remove the devices, others may work around them.
Jeff
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James Owens wrote:

deviations, others may be drunk with the power of their position. I have had both types. The guy that inspected the wiring in my 12'x16' pool house was the former kind. I kinda rushed ahead after the wiring was installed and put up paneling on the walls. When he came, I offered to remove the paneling and he said it's not necessary. He then took out a small circuit tester with the led lights and stuck it in the outlets, and then flipped the light switches. Said OK, gave me the certificate, and left.

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On Tue, 5 Oct 2004 06:52:30 -0700, James Owens wrote

Hello Again, James -
Assuming they do things the same in Ontario - The rough is to OK the wiring and box installation before the walls are closed. You'd normally call for it before you'd make any connections or installed any switches or receptacles. However, in some jurisdictions the inspector would want to see the grounding conductor bonded to all the boxes while they were open. IMHO, if you've already connected some devices just leave them hanging out of the boxes. That shouldn't interfere with what the inspector's there to check.
I assume you can't get any information on the number you call to schedule the inspection. When you eventually meet the inspector, ask for his card, it might save you some future trouble to have a number to call.
Regarding pigtailing: NO. The conductors are to be made up tight like any otner connection. Wiring so that the devices can be removed without breaking the circuit does not imply anything about the ease of removal. Pigtailing is particularly important for the grounding conductor - if some future electrician comes along and clips out a receptacle, you want the fault path to be maintained.
You mentioned twisting the wires before capping. I will try to resist getting into the twisting vs. not twisting debate. There have been threads on professional electrician's websites that went on for weeks on that one. Suffice it to say that the code requires all electrical equipment to be installed according to the manufacturer's directions (in the case of connectors, these are either printed on the box or on a scrap of paper inside.) There are some connectors where the manufacturer directs you to pre-twist and some that say not to, and some that are silent on the point...
Good luck on the inspection,
- Kenneth
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I do electrical inspections, I want to be able to see the wire sizes used, routing and protection of the conductors, grounding, etc. If the quality of everything I see is up to par, i won't worry too much about a device or two in place. If I see problems, then I may be there for a while.

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i think you are in trouble. if you don't even know what rough inspection means in your area, the inspector will see you as the rankest of amateurs. he/she will be looking carefully to be sure you've done EVERYTHING correctly. there'll be no leeway.
you should find out. and make it so. that's what i'd do. just phone them. i've spoken with a few electrical inspectors and they're just guys trying to do a job. no power trippin' i'd try to make their job as easy as possible. and if he asks a question like "how'd you connect the grounds?", you'd better know how you did it and have done it right. ...thehick
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