What am I doing so wrong in this kitchen sink strainer removal process?

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My sister calls me up with a report of a slow kitchen sink leak.
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7133/13499852564_edb405d4a3_z.jpg
It turns out to be the connection between plastic and metal:
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3728/13499614443_6a441550b3_z.jpg
I tried using the "correct" tool, but it just bungled up the ring:
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7424/13499516305_6462995cc1_b.jpg
I tried using the old screwdriver & mallet method, also to no avail:
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7414/13499613243_34b1bf74f6_b.jpg
Now it's all bungled up (and she's mad at me because it's inoperative):
http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5012/13499512885_68dd93f3bb_b.jpg
What am I doing wrong?
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I used a propane torch on one that was giving me problems. Heated it and then it turned free.
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Oren wrote:

That's true of most vanity drains , but not most kitchen basket strainers . Best thing to do in this case is get the old one out any way possible and replace it with a new unit . Might want to do a pre-emptive replacement of the other one too if it's a double sink . . -- Snag
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What Danny D says
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Danny D.:
You're not doing anything wrong.
It looks like someone has mixed plumber's putty with linseed oil, and used that to GLUE the lock nut you're trying to remove on. That yellow stuff in your pictures looks too glossy to me to be ordinary plumber's putty. Either it's plumber's putty mixed with linseed oil, or it's some kinda glue or something.
Normally, the plumber's putty goes between the flange at the top of the strainer basket and the flanged bottom of the sink. See the image below:
http://tinyurl.com/n4c7n6h
There shouldn't be any plumber's putty on the underside of the sink at all, and that yellow stuff in your pictures sure doesn't look like just plumber's putty to me. I'm thinking it's some kind of glue or maybe some one figured they'd mix linseed oil into their plumber's putty so that it would stick better and harden up over time, making it a bytch to remove that lock nut in future. AND, he appears to have used that linseed oil/plumber's putty on the threads between the lock nut and the strainer basket as well. That's why the lock nut wouldn't turn for you; it's glued on with linseed oil.
Look at the image linked to above. It's incorrect because it doesn't show the threads on the strainer basket or the threads on the lock nut. The OD of the strainer basket is threaded and the ID of the lock nut is threaded so that when you screw the lock nut onto the strainer basket, you squash the plumber's putty between the flange at the top of the strainer basket and the flanged bottom of the sink, making a water proof seal. You simply don't need any plumber's putty on the underside of the sink, so why that stuff is there is a mystery, and suggest to me that whomever did that work didn't know what he was doing.
Use a screw driver or something to pry one end of the broken locknut outwards to break it away from the strainer basket. Use two screw drivers to work your way around the lock nut, or better yet, just break the rest of it off too.
Then, use a small screw driver or even the corner of a wood chisel to pry the flanged top of the stainer basket upward so that it comes out of the sink. If it's glued on with linseed oil, you may have to take a torch to the strainer basket (ONLY!) to soften the linseed oil so that it lets go of the strainer basket. Maybe put some cardboard under the fulcrum of whatever lever you use to pry up that strainer basket flange so that you don't mar the bottom of the sink.
Then figure out what that yellow stuff is and get it off. If it's plumber's putty, you should be able to scrape it off with a putty knife. If it's plumber's putty mixed with linseed oil, you'll probably have to use a paint stripper or a heat gun (or good hair dryer and lots of patience) to remove it. If it's got linseed oil in it, then get a paint stripper that uses methylene chloride as it's active ingredient, like Polystrippa. If it's some kinda glue, I'd try acetone or lacquer thinner to dissolve it. Nail polish remover is acetone, so maybe try that first to see if it dissolves that yellow stuff. You may want to try carving most of it off with a cheap Stanley wood chisel for $5 from Home Depot, and then dissolving what's left with acetone or lacquer thinner.
Then, phone around to the plumbing wholesalers in your area and find out which of them sell Kindred 1135 strainer baskets, and replace the junk you have with the best strainer basket on the market that I know of. The 1135 doesn't use a lock nut. It uses a threaded hollow rod in the middle of the strainer basket that you tighten with a coin, like a quarter or Canadian "loonie" dollar coin.
You're not doing anything wrong. That strainer basket was a problem waiting for someone to correct it.
--
nestork

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Once you're finished using your Plumber's putty, use your finger to wet the top surface of the putty in the tub with either corn oil or grape seed oil, which you should be able to find in your local supermarket. That will help prevent the putty from drying out and getting hard at the top on you. And, you can use the rest of it as cooking oil.
--
nestork

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On Sun, 30 Mar 2014 13:13:32 +0200, nestork wrote:

Thanks for that idea.
I used olive oil, as that's all I had.
BTW, what is the purpose of this swivel contraption?
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3717/13523029885_93baf3c454_b.jpg
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My guess is a vent.
What do I win if I'm right?
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On Sun, 30 Mar 2014 23:02:55 +0000, DerbyDad03 wrote:

It sure looks and acts like a vent.
Is that normal for a kitchen sink trap to have a vent which is open to the underside of the sink?
And, why bother swiveling?
Do you think the vent contraption had anything to do with this, which I removed in order to make room for me to work down there?
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7367/13523332633_5a1f76c48e_c.jpg
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Danny D. wrote:

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On Sun, 30 Mar 2014 19:12:28 -0600, JAS wrote:

Ah, that makes sense.
The Sears Kenmore reverse osmosis water filtration system under the cabinet was partially disconnected, so I simply removed it, in toto.
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7367/13523332633_5a1f76c48e.jpg
My sis told me to take it away, but do you think it can be used for something useful?
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Danny D. wrote:

have worse water than without. I do not know of anything it could be used for other than what it was designed for.
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On Sun, 30 Mar 2014 09:17:20 +0200, nestork wrote:

You should be a forensic plumber, because just explained the enigma!
Thinking more about what you so astutely observed, I can see that someone probably *glued* the tailpipe (upside down, with the hat on the bottom instead of on the top!) into the sink basket.
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3780/13505372434_a03646487d_b.jpg
No wonder I had trouble unscrewing the cast aluminum retaining ring!
http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5012/13499512885_68dd93f3bb_b.jpg
They *glued* the sink basket into place, from the underside of the sink!
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7009/13505120013_747ff88475_b.jpg
It hadn't occurred to me until you mentioned the glue, but I just realized there was no plumbers putty to scrape off in the sink!
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3798/13505373804_f830e289ba_b.jpg
My sister tells me the Sears guy who installed the Kenmore reverse osmosis water filter had last removed and re-installed the pipes, so, I suspect (without any more evidence) he was our lazy culprit!
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On Sun, 30 Mar 2014 09:17:20 +0200, nestork wrote:

Now that you clued me in to the fact that the underside of the basket was *GLUED* to the sink, it all starts to make sense!
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3728/13499614443_6a441550b3_b.jpg
I don't know WHO did it, but, my sister told me the last guy there was the Sears Kenmore reverse osmosis installer.
Notwithstanding the fact the reverse osmosis system leaked long ago so they disconnected it (but left it in place), what seems to have happened is that installer *glued* the basket from the underside.
If so, that explains the inability of the lock ring to turn.
It also explains the lack of caulking on the topside under the basket flange.
It explains why I had to bang the strainer out from the underside.
And, it possibly explains why the tailpipe was upside down.
Sheeesh. You can't trust whomever did all that, just to save a buck!
Thanks for figuring out the enigma. I've been fixing things around the home almost ever day, without needing to post lately, but, this one had perplexed me until you pointed out the glue!
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On Sun, 30 Mar 2014 09:17:20 +0200, nestork wrote:

Actually, it's also likely incorrect because, I've read, we should probably not mix plastic nuts with metal threads ... :)
I'm not sure *why* but I had read that in my search for answers before I had posted.
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On Sun, 30 Mar 2014 09:17:20 +0200, nestork wrote:

This brings up a good question, especially since the flange on the sink basket that I put in is not wide enough to cover the rust, so, I have to replace it anyway.
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3669/13523241545_5cbd59d2dd_b.jpg
When I was at Home Depot, there was a $20 Glacial, $30 whatever, and $40 Kohler sink basket.
I had wanted the Kohler, but, my wallet was recently stolen, so I had no credit cards and only enough for the $20 strainer basket and parts and tools.
The $40 Kohler was something like twice or three times as heavy as the Glacial - and it seemed to be built better.
Would you equate the Kohler with that Kindred?
I'm not sure the model of the Kohler, but here's one guess from googling right now for home depot and kohler kitchen strainer: http://www.homedepot.com/s/kohler%2520kitchen%2520strainer
PS: What do I look for in a "good" kitchen strainer, now that I know I put a junky one in my sister's kitchen sink?
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'Danny D.[_10_ Wrote:

Yes, but that installation guy had already done that job hundreds of times before and already knew what he had to do just by looking under her sink.
--
nestork

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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Not just a vent , I think it's a vacuum break so the dishwasher doesn't siphon from the sink . It looks like the DW is plumbed into the drain downstream from the device - does the device have a one-way valve of some kind inside ?
--
Snag



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On Sat, 29 Mar 2014 18:49:45 -0700, Oren wrote:

I tried all sorts of pliers to remove the basket from below:
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7346/13505035785_cdc8dfa1a1_z.jpg
I even tried circular vise grips:
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7383/13505374644_8a0d0e981d_c.jpg
In the end, I chiselled off the cast aluminum lock ring:
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3714/13505374234_a22fab2157_c.jpg
And, then I banged the basket up with a rubber mallet:
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3780/13505372434_a03646487d_c.jpg
The good news is that the basket is now out of my sister's sink:
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7009/13505120013_747ff88475_c.jpg
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On Sat, 29 Mar 2014 22:21:39 -0500, Terry Coombs wrote:

It wasn't elegant, but I pried & banged the old strainer basket out.
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3714/13505374234_a22fab2157_c.jpg
So that now all I have to do is clean up the gunk in the hole.
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3798/13505373804_f830e289ba_c.jpg
What I found out was that the previous owner jury rigged the basket with caulk and the tailpipe put in upside down.
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3750/13505376044_ebb00e1fd1_c.jpg
So, I'm going to replace all that incorrect plumbing tomorrow.
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7248/13505122973_072ca1f4eb_c.jpg
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