Wbat is a hands-free meter?

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Wbat is a hands-free meter?
I don't especially want this meter, but I do want to know why it's called hands-free.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
It has 2 test leads, but no robot to hold them where they should go.
I googled and they all hands free seem to be by Equus. Is this just some stupid marketing ploy.
Oh, here's another brand: Omega makes a hands-free talking digital meter, but shouldnb't this be called eyes-free? http://www.omega.com/Pressure/pdf/HHM2.pdf Oh, it has an asterisk after "free" and that points to "*When meter is clipped on a belt or used on a bench" In that case, isn't every meter hands-free!!!
And how are those equus meters hands free when they don't talk?
I'm just sayin'
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micky wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)
Just replace the pair of test leads with spring loaded J shaped clip tips. Your meter becomes ands free too, LOL. Fancy word game they play all the time.
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(Amazon.com product link shortened)
Did you read the description? It states: a.. Includes test lead holders for hands-free testing
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wrote:

I did read that, but unless the test points I want are the same distance apart as the test lead holders, how does that help? And even then, I'd have to hold the meter.
On a walmart page for a different meter I came across a photo of someone with the meter strapped to his wrist, but none of the meters incluidng that one and the 3310 I asked about say anything about including a strap or elastic band, or being able to attach one. If I did a lot of meter work with little in between, places to conentiently attach a strap would be good, but I just put the meter on the car somewhere.
Walmart pages have the advantage of very easy to use englarging, so one can see what's written on the meter. And they sell a lot of the same stuff, but Amazon was cheaper on 3 of the equus meters, in one case about 60 vs. 80 dollars.
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It's referring to hands-free for the test LEADS. Usually when using a meter you have the meter resting on something and you're holding the leads in your hands. At least that's how I use it. I agree the lead holders are of very limited practical value. Maybe more useful to store the lead ends than anything else.
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On Fri, 24 Feb 2012 07:29:57 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

I still don't get it. How is it hands free, especially for the leads, which have to be held to be put on the spots where they should go. The pictures showed probes, not alligator clips.

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The maker's site at http://equus.com/Product/Detail/17AFBC28-6610-4634-8E5B-6351A2428223 has a flash video. The thing has a strap so you can put it on your arm like a big wristwatch, so you can hold the leads in each hand and still have the meter in view. Looks kinda handy, actually.
The clips that hold the leads for storage are not part of the handsfree feature.
Chip C Toronto
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wrote:
<<The maker's site at http://equus.com/Product/Detail/17AFBC28-6610-4634-8E5B-6351A2428223 has a flash video. The thing has a strap so you can put it on your arm like a big wristwatch, so you can hold the leads in each hand and still have the meter in view. Looks kinda handy, actually.>>
And easy to emulate with two big rubber bands.
-- Bobby G.
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wrote:

That's it.

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Might it accurately be called Nose-Free also?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
The thing obviously has no hands, so it is obviously "hands free." ; - ))
JimCo
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Then why does the feature list say this:
"Includes test lead holders for hands-free testing"

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wrote:

Because the retailers don't seem to have understood the following sentence written by the manufacturer:
"They all include test leads and holders as well as an easy slip though strap for hands free testing."
(I would have at least put a comma after the word "holders".)
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On Sat, 25 Feb 2012 11:12:35 -0800 (PST), Larry Fishel

That's it! You figured it out.

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-snip-

Alligators aren't the only way to grip. This is the first diagram I found that looks similar to one of the lead sets I have. Not necessarily what the one you posted has, but it gives you an idea of a non-alligator gripper- http://www.parrot-invent.com/test_leads_clips/pcmclip.htm
Those are just clips-- mine are right on a lead.
I *think* mine came from radioshack.
Jim
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On Fri, 24 Feb 2012 07:29:57 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

I tholught you were talking about b) the things on the side of the case to hold the leads, but if you are talking -- if they were talking -- about c) leads that hold on to wires, that would explain it all.
"Includes test lead holders for hands-free testing" That sure sounds like b to me. "Test leads that hold" woudl be c.
Reviewers wrote about b and said they didnt' hold the probes well.
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wrote:

BTW, if I got you interested in this, the model 3320 is only a couple dollars more and has auto-off (with a warning beep some time before it turns off), auto-range (if you like those things) , AC current up to 200 ma, a 3-light battery tester, instead of just the voltage (if you like lights)
And when I played the video they all came with a wrist strap. Although if I used a hand to hold my meter, I'd need 3 hands!! (Well, often I jumper the ground to a ground, with an alligator clip wire, but I still don't hold the meter. I use my free hand to scratch my nose. )

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wrote:

At least three reviewers complained about the continuity tester and one guy writes "If you want to measure low voltages or continuity, make sure to replace the probes first. There is something wrong with the metal coating of probe tips. You have to press the metal tips hard to hear the buzzer. After I replaced the probes there was no problem.
I suspect the metal plating of the probe tips is improperly formulated. It probably suffers from some type of oxide forming on them that has poor conductivity. You can rub, but it immediately forms again due to the exposure to air. " Now I'm curious. If I like the meter, I'll trade leads with another meter.
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wrote:

Recently I got a new Fluke 117 for like $120 on ebay. The leads seem pretty good to me but I'm just an amateur. I like the tester but I admit it's overkill but I bought it for its durability, exceeding my needs and so I never have to buy another tester. Should it outlive me, I hope to pass it on. And it's coming in handy as I will be using it shortly to find the common wire in a 3 way switch so I can replace the switch with a timer.
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It should. They're pretty much bullet proof.
Here's a pretty good tutorial on how to use 'em:
http://www.ladyada.net/learn/multimeter/index.html
nb
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It should outlast you. One thing about the Fluke is the safety rating for it. A CAT III 600 volt rating. I am not sure of the ratings of the low cost units. For around the house and under 250 volts the low cost units are probably ok. I work with 3 phase 480 volt circuits that can have over 300 amps on them at times. For that I use one of several of the Fluke meters I have. Company I work for provides them. If you ever see a safety film of what can hapen to a nonrated meter if you hapen to have it in the ohms or amp position and get across a voltage , you will be glad you have a quality meter.
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