Water Heater Thermostat settings ?

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Never set them less than 130 as you risk bacteria living in the water heater. Legionellae is a big culprit. Set them both the same.
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On Fri, 26 Feb 2010 23:26:39 -0500, "Ed Pawlowski"

I've had Legionaires.
They come, they eat your food. They won't leave, and they never chip in.
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wrote:

Kinda like family?!
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James wrote:

135 - 140 is good settings.
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I've kept both upper and lower set to 120 for over twenty years. If you don't set the top and bottom to the same temp, then when you shower, after a few minutes or so the temp will change as the hotter/colder water at the top of the tank is used up. I doubt anyone would really notice. If you like hotter water, you can set the upper element to a higher temp, and when you wash your hands and do things that don't use much water, you will get the hotter water. When you bath, the water will cool a bit after a few minutes. Again not sure who would notice.
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James wrote:

140 or 150 anyway? Dishwashers like 140+ also.
s
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On Sat, 27 Feb 2010 07:12:05 -0600, Steve Barker

Safety for smaller children is one reason to limit the temp. Another is energy savings (less lost heat).

All dishwashers have auxilary heaters to heat the water to the proper temperature.

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PeterD wrote:

When I was a child we didn't have all of these silly nanny-minded safety measures, and we turned out fine. If you are stupid, or clumsy, you get burnt. If you fail to learn the lesson, you are probably too stupid to deserve to live anyway.
This is the way it has always been, and by changing this, we are doing a dis-service to future generations of humans.
Jon
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On Sat, 27 Feb 2010 14:42:16 -0800, "Jon Danniken"

Certainly. You have to know how to mount a seat in an outhouse. You could fall in. What was a swimming class, in those days? Thrown into the lake - SWIM!
Way back then children handled guns, drove at 14 years of age or even owned a first car at 12 or 14. You could drive at night with the 16 year old sister in the car (licensed sister).

Kids today never lived before in-door plumbing.
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On Sat, 27 Feb 2010 14:42:16 -0800, "Jon Danniken"

You are a moron, right? Children sometimes do things that for an adult are "Stupid, or clumsy" as you put it. This includes turning on the hot water without considering the effects, and being unable to turn it off.
So go pour yourself a really hot bath, and soak your head.
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sanitizer.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The heat of the water in washing dishes doesn't have much to do with disease prevention...mainly the mechanical cleaning action and not using sponges, cloths or towels that are growing bacteria.
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On Sat, 27 Feb 2010 18:15:34 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net"

Hot water does a far better job of cleaning (bacteria off) the dishes.

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PeterD wrote:

no they don't.
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On Sat, 27 Feb 2010 21:04:30 -0600, Steve Barker

Can you post a URL to one that doesn't? Uh, a mechanical/electric one, not your wife, that is... <bg>
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Aside from personal preferences, some states have laws pertaining to this. For instance, as a landlord (in WA, and probably others), the max legal setting is 120. This is to protect children, the elderly, and common idiots from scalding themselves. 120 won't sterilize your dishes, and I find that to be only a marginally comfortable shower water setting in the PNW. My home settings are at 140. For rentals, I include a clause in the rental agreement which states the law, then directs the landlord to set it at _____..... usually 135-140 ....., then holds the landlord harmless for any resulting injuries. Fingers crossed that this clause will never be tested in court. It's too bad there isn't a setting which will sterilize morons.
In the desert SW, our settings are 125. This won't sterilize dishes, but it's warm enough for a comfortable shower. The water quality is so terrible they add bleach to the supply... strong enough to smell it when you flush, or turn on a tap, and likely strong enough to sterilize dishes too. This compromise also saves money, considering the higher electric rates. Many full time desert residents turn their water heaters off in the summer, since the ambient water temperature rises when the air is 110-120 every day, and never cools below 80-90. When in Rome.....
Unc
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135-140 F is the range you should be looking for, if you have small children tin the house, consider a mixing valve at the bathroom sinks with a single on/off lever. We use them in schools to prevent accidental burns with kids. The normal setting is about 100/105 F , the cost is minimal and you won t find them at the Big Box stores, it gives them warm water to wash their hands, but will not cause scalds, the same holds true with emergency showers in science labs in high schools. Domestic dishwashers pre-heat the water, commercial dishwashers typically have an external pre-heater that heats the water to 180F before it enters the dishwasher.
Tom

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Please remember, the only question from this OP was whether the top thermostat should be set at same temp as the lower one. Out of 34 messages so far, I think one person has addressed this single question posed in the OP. Most other messages have tried to tell me **what temperature** I should set my water heater. As I noted in my OP, I have already decided that.
Thanks !!
James
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Source: V.E.R.A. -- Virtual Entity of Relevant Acronyms December 2001
OP Original Poster (slang, Usenet)=======================================Out of 34 messagesso far, I think one person has addressed this single question posed in theOP. CY: One would need to be a surgeon, to adress the question posed in the original poster. Most other messages have tried to tell me **what temperature** Ishould set my water heater. As I noted in my OP, I have already decidedthat.CY: How did you get a message in your original poster? Swollow a capsule?
--
Christopher A. Young
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People often make decisions based on wrong information, lack of full information or facts needed for a better decision. You are in that category. Rather than do some fact finding and educate yourself, you choose to denigrate those that attempted to help. Thanks for taking the time to do that.
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