Washing lightbulbs

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On Oct 18, 1:36pm, snipped-for-privacy@2012.com wrote:

You don't have to clean CF bulbs. Don't you know what CF stands for?
Clean Forever
Where did you think the energy savings came from?
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On 10/18/2012 12:35 PM, snipped-for-privacy@2012.com wrote:

Try running them through a full wash and dry cycle in the dishwasher. That should return them to factory-new condition.
Don't forget the Jet-Dri!
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On 10/18/2012 12:35 PM, snipped-for-privacy@2012.com wrote:

I use a feather duster or equivalent and canned air does a good job too. ^_^
TDD
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On 10/18/2012 1:35 PM, snipped-for-privacy@2012.com wrote:

Enter the search term "massaging footbath" into your favorite search engine. For about $30 you can get 1 new. You may even find a used one at a Goodwill or Salvation Army store. If you are working, the $30 should be worth it to save 3 days of effort. If you're retired, or chronically unemployed, just pump up your favorite music and enjoy the cleaning project while you listen.
If you are careful not to immerse the first inch or so of the CFL lamp where it emerges from the base, this foot bath device might do the job. You'd have to experiment to find the most effective cleaning agent to put in the water but I'd start with a dish washing liquid that cuts grease, such as Dawn or Palmolive. If it doesn't do the job, at least you can treat yourself to some relaxing foot baths.
You probably won't find too many people who feel the need to use more than a feather duster or a quick blow of air from your mouth (if anything at all) on their CFLs so you're probably on your own here.
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snipped-for-privacy@2012.com wrote:

Get help for your ADD.
There may even be a 12-step program available in your town.
Question: Do you dust INSIDE the books on your shelves?
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If they do, they should wear a dust jacket.
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On 10/18/12 1:35 PM, snipped-for-privacy@2012.com wrote:

My butler takes care of it.
--
If Obama is reelected to a second term, hell truly be able to talk
about the mess he inherited.
  Click to see the full signature.
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Mark Flint:
Incandescent light bulbs do become dimmer as they get older, but that is NOT due to dust accumulation on the light bulbs. It's entirely due to the tungsten metal atoms from the filament coating the inside of the bulb. So, this is something that cannot be removed by washing the outside of the bulb.
Here, prove it to yourself: When you replace light bulbs that have spent their lives in one position; such as vertical in the case of freestanding floor or desk lamps, or horizontal in the case of bathroom and bedroom light fixtures, or upside down as in the case of porch and hallway lights, inspect the bulb when you remove it from the fixture.
You will notice that the top of the bulb always has the most darkening on the inside of the glass. That's because incandescent light bulbs are filled with an inert gas (most often argon), and convection of hot argon gas off the hot tungsten filiment carries the tungsten atoms upwards, thereby causing the topmost part of the bulb to darken the most.
Washing your light bulbs won't eliminate that darkening that happens inside the bulb.
--
nestork


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--

Yes, darkening due to tungsten evaporation is one of those little-known effects that used to drive lamp engineers crazy in the early days of incandescent lighting. Carbon filament lamps were worse since they were vacuum lamps (no gas inside) and so blackened uniformly. Several types of large, high-wattage stage/studio lamps used to be made with a half teaspoon or so of loose grains of tungsten inside so that when they darkened, the lamp could be removed and then shaken to swirl the tungsten around to scour the inside of the glass.
Tomsic
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wrote:

Nah, I've already got a concealed firearms license.
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In typed:

409 and a soft cloth.
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