Voltage question about European Transformer

I bought an external modem. It came with a European transformer to plug into outlet. There are some real odd round plugs on it. It reads INPUT: 230V ~50HZ 140MA OUTPUT: 12V 1A
It came with an adaptor to plug into a standard US outlet, which has 120V ~60HZ.
How can it put out 12V on the output side when the Input voltage is nearly half what it's designed for? Also, what effect does the 50 versus 60 HZ have?
It does work, but the front panel lights seem sort of dim (in my opinion).
Thanks
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On 9/2/2011 2:50 PM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

...
Having come w/ a US adapter it was designed for dual input voltage, just maybe? (As in "Duh")
Obviously, nothing regarding the input frequency.
--



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If it's a "switcher" it doesn't care about the frequency. And regardless, a 50hz unit is generally safe on 60 - not necessarily the other way around.
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On Fri, 02 Sep 2011 14:08:40 -0700, Smitty Two

Just for the heck of it, I found a 12v wall wart in my junk box, made for a USA 120v line. The modem works on that one too, and the lights are the same brightness. So I guess you're right on that.....
Thanks
I still wonder why they need 230v in Europe on their outlets? Seems more dangerous for one thing, plus there seems to be no need for it on small items such as this. I suppose it might be more handy for large appliances such as an electric clothes dryer, because there dont need to be a special outlet for the dryer, but it's still more dangerous for lighting and small appliances.
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Agreed, the insulation must be thicker. However, insulation is cheaper than copper. Current can be 1/2 the cross section for the same power being delivered.
/paul W3FIS
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Why would the insulation need to be thicker? We put often 240 volts through the cables that we use now, they are rated for 660 volts. European voltages have been a standard for the past century, the same as North American voltages. They are not going to change now.
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IF I understand if correctly, the EU folks do nnot have 240V center- tapped circuits like we have here in the USA they have all 240V with respet to ground. But the insulation still hase to withstand 240V to other circuitsss. Maybe it is a NIH phenomena.
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wrote:

Agreed..... I use the same #12 wire to power my 240v air compressor, that I use to wire 120v 20a circuits. It's all rated at 600v or higher. I did use some house wire to run a feed to an electric fence for horses. There is no real current on them but the voltage is normally around 5000v. I can get zapped right thru the insulation if I'm on wet soil, but it's less "bite" than touching the bare wires of the fence. It's mostly just to slow down leakage when branches touch it in wind. They do make a special wire insulated for those fences but it's costly. I agree they wont be changing the voltages anymore.
I am curious, how do the entrance cables come into those european homes? Do they just have two wires? Hot and Neutral? (no center tap on the transformer). I guess that would save a little wire.....
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Normally there is one phase and neutral. There are three or four earthing (grounding) systems. The centre tap is neutral. We don't centre tap the transformer windings (called zig zag connection over here) unless for rectification purposes. Or you can get three phases and neutral but that's quite uncommon.
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Normally there is one phase and neutral. There are three or four earthing (grounding) systems. The centre tap is neutral. We don't centre tap the transformer windings (called zig zag connection over here) unless for rectification purposes. Or you can get three phases and neutral but that's quite uncommon.
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I assumed he was talking about the thin (lacquer?) insulation on motor windings and such, but I could be wrong...
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On 9/2/2011 11:09 PM, Larry Fishel wrote:

Varnish is typically used on motor windings and transformers. From memory the dielectric strength of red insulating varnish is 3,000v/mil.
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On 9/2/2011 8:39 PM, EXT wrote:

North American wiring is generally insulated with various rubber, fibers or plastics rated at 600 volts. Look at the printing on the wiring. What I've seen of the wiring for European type 230 volt power is insulation rated at 1000 volts. I wired some housing units I lived in when I worked for a contractor on an overseas job where the trailers came from Australia. Their version of ROMEX looked like an American dryer cord and had gray plastic insulation rated at 1000 volts.
TDD
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deadgoose wrote:

Hi, Higher voltage improves efficiency. Lesser heat loss. Look at the voltages on HV transmission lines.
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R T F M !
In typed:

...
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