Vacuum Cleaner Hose

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When you say a "tank type" do you mean a canister?
I had a Eureka Mighty Mite canister since the late eighties that couldn't be killed. Over the years, I replaced a wheel and the on-off switch, but from a vacuum perspective, this little workhorse can't be beat. I used it for my cars, stairs, ceiling cobwebs, around the workshop, garage, etc.
It's fallen down stairs, been left in the rain, been hit by a car (don't ask!) and just generally been treated pretty roughly over the years.
My son borrowed it to clean the apartment he was moving into, so I let him keep it and bought myself a new one. After 20+ years, that thing is still going strong and owes me nothing.
Here's the current version - $99, free shipping, and includes a total of 8 bags. I spoke to a local vacuum shop who said that a lot of commercial cleaning companies buy this model for it's ruggedness and compactness. It even comes with a shoulder carrying strap. I'm looking forward to another 20 years with this bad boy.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/EUREKA-SANITAIRE-MIGHTY-MITE-SC3683-2-Pks-FREE-BAGS-/320163491950?pt=US_Vacuum&hash=item4a8b3b306e
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On Thu, 1 Mar 2012 13:06:56 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

I've got an old Hoover Guardsmen Heavy Duty upright vacuum that hasn't been abused but has picked up everything including nails and the only maintenance I've ever done on it was change the rubber band that drives the brush and clean the impella blade of hair. It's at least 20 years old tho I'm thinking more like 25 to 30. You can still buy them for around $200 but its not all metal construction like mine. Perhaps they sell a more expensive one that is of all metal??? Of course the newer ones are probably a bit lighter to carry.
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We've always used decent uprights for the floors and rugs, but they really are a pain to use for anything where you need to use the hose and attachments. They fall over, the hose is "wound too tight" and is always fighting you, you have to unhook it and then clip it back into all the holders, it's hard to balance on a staircase, etc.
I completely understand why the OP would want to extend the hose, assuming he's using it for the purposes a canister is better suited for.
However, instead of trying to modify an upright to work like a canister vac, I chose many years ago to have the right tool for the right job by having both types of vacuums.
I can't imagine taking the upright out to the driveway to vacuum my cars, van or trailer even if the hose was 40 feet long.
Long live the Mighty Mite!
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On Fri, 2 Mar 2012 11:03:48 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

I agree. I only use the upright for floors not steps or other things. I have 2 canisters and a wet/dry shop vac for the other purposes.
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Well, the shop vac goes without saying!
Works great for getting leaves out from inside and behind the bushes and from around the plants in SWMBO's gardens.
It's also great for digging holes and trenches in the sandy soil around my house.
I once dug a hole deep enough to bury 55 gallon drum drywell with my shop vac. By shaving the walls of the hole straight down with the tubes, I was able to dig deep enough without having to go wide, something that would have been impossible with a shovel.
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On 3/2/2012 2:27 PM, Doug wrote:

Bissell makes an upright model that the motor and canister lift out of the base unit. We have one, its a model #18Z6. The lift out feature is handy for doing steps, furniture and behind things, just carry it around to where you need it.
Its a bag-less model that does a good job on carpets, particularly good if you have pets. Its only failing is on hard surfaces, like hard wood floors as it tends to shoot stuff out behind it with the brush turned on and if the brush is off won't pick up things that are stuck to hardwood, like damp leaves tracked in. The sister-in-law has a $$$ Dyson and it isn't nearly as handy, doesn't do steps at all, but does super suck what it can reach. ;)
I'll stick to the Bissell at <1/3 the price, thanks, $180~ vs. $600~.
Also have a 12 yr old Sears 16gal shop vac, a must have if you own a home. Been using the same filter since I got it, just take it out bang it on the ground to clear out the crap and you are good to go. It will still pick up drywall dust or suck up water without destroying itself, best $100 I ever spent. Can't beat it for the annual flower garden cleanup, picking up clippings and such out of a mulched bed, haven't tried it for evening the sides of dug hole as someone else mentioned, but not a bad idea!
John
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On Wed, 29 Feb 2012 19:20:32 -0600, jim evans

It seems like the definitive answer would be to use it like it was intended. Why did you buy it if it wasn't what you wanted?
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On Wed, 29 Feb 2012 19:20:32 -0600, jim evans

Maybe you can find a connector in the plastic plumbing section of a hardware store. Or make one out of sheet metal. A rectangle rolled over the tubes in your picture and connected where the ends meet by ?? soldering?, use of automoblile hose clamps, ....??
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