Using vacuumed garbage bags to store clothes

I once saw a great suggestion from the "Haley's Hints" book on storing clothes, blankets, pillows, etc. The book suggested putting the items into a large black garbage bag and then vacuuming out the air with the hose attachment of one's vacuum cleaner. It works like a charm, except for one problem...... I can't get the vacuum to stay. After one hour or so after vacuuming out the bag, the air seems to seep in and the bag returns to its original size. I try to make sure the top is securely closed by twisting the end and securing it with rubber bands. I use new, heavy guage garbage bags so I can't imagine that there are holes in them. What can be the problem? Help please.
Al Kondo
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Al Kondo wrote:

Put a coat in the bag and vacuum it. Put the vacuumed bag in a bucket of water.
After the bag expands, remove the coat and put it on. If your neck is wet, the bag has a leak in the top. If your ass is wet, it is leaking from the bottom. If you're wet all over, get in the house - it's raining out!
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You can test for airtightness by inflating the bag, then closing off the top, then putting weight on the bag to see if the bag deflates. Many bags of this kind do leak from pinholes and bad seams, and it takes only a tiny leak to reflate after sucking the air out, as the clothes exert outward pressure on the bag once the air is withdrawn. I find freezer bags and ziplocks much more likely to be airtight vs trash bags. Alternatively, you could place the bags in boxes once the air is withdrawn, then close the boxes. Make sure the bags are stored in a really dry place.
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Al Kondo wrote:

I doubt if most bags are going to be able to hold the vacuum very long. They just are not heavy enough to do it and it would be difficult to get a good seal with the twist tie.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

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The bags you're describing are about as cheap as can be, and still be sold at price you'd be willing to pay for a bag that most people fill with trash and throw away. The idea is a good one, though. Bed, Bath & Beyond sells very thick plastic bags that are intended for the purpose you mentioned. A friend of mine uses them and she's very happy with them. Personally, I don't like my clothes crushed that way, but they do work. I haven't seen one in awhile, but if I recall, they have an opening for the vacuum hose, with a snap on or screw on cap, sort of like those inflatable beds.
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Put your head in the bag, vacume out the air and listen where the leaks are , to fix first.
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Vacume? Bush voter?
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I doubt you will ever get garbage bags to hold the seal, but you don't need to.
Vacuum the air out, then promptly pack them tightly in their storage area, be it a plastic bin, whatever. If you pack it in densely, they will let the air back in slowly, and they will expand to fill the area that they are in, but you will still have the advantage of being able to store a lot in a small area.
Problem will be when you pull out just one bag, the rest will inflate to fill that bag's area.
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