Using the push-in option (and no screw tighten) on outlets

Page 1 of 2  
OK - I've read the bitter vitriol in here used to describe the use of the push-in option when wiring electrical outlets, but is there any study someone can point to that has tested the long term difference between the screw terminals and the push-in variety? All I hear is anecdotal - kinda like the resistance a few have for using PEX in plumbing.
Aside from 'personal experience', is there any data?
a
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I dont know but I have had one fail and will never use another one. when anything is the cheapest available its usually not a good deal.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Use them and let us know.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
a wrote:

I think NEC banned 'stab' connections on outlets used with 12ga wire. I don't know what data they used if any to make that change. I always use 12ga 20Amp circuits. When I come across any 'stabbed' outlets or switches I will go ahead and pull the wires out and use the screws. I can never seem to make the release things to work so I end up pulling hard while twisting back and forth. If you do use the 'stab' connectors then I would use pigtails. I prefer to use the 'back-feed' type where you put the wire in the hole and tighten the screws. I am comfortable using those without pigtails. The back feed type do cost more though, over $2.00 each. Kevin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I would think the real world experiences of thousands of people and tens of thousands of outlets would consitute 'data'. It's been proven over and over that the pushin connection is unreliable especially when in the middle of a 'series' run of outlets. I use them very rarely and only on a single switch. I never use 14 ga on outlets so it's a moot point on them.
s

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
S. Barker wrote:

OK - this is *exactly* what I'm talking about - what 'thousands of people'?? Where do you get this information?
a
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
a wrote:

Hi, I don't know about statistical data but just law od physics. It may be quick and easy method but look at the contact area of the wire vs. looping wire around screw and tightening it. Spcially when the outlet is carry near capacity current. I never wired using stab method. But I am sold on PEX.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tony Hwang wrote:

(I *love* PEX too!) but I do think about the physics - is a larger contact area better? Will I get a bigger jolt if I put my thumb on a hot rail than if I put my pinkie on it?
a
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
a wrote:

Hi, Jolt is a function of voltage, not current. Across car battery, not much jolt.Current is a function of contact area or size of wire. Like thicker wire has more current carrying capacity. If frequency of current goes way high into R.F. range, skin effect comes into play. That is why R.F. carrying conductor is some times hollow pipe or multi strand wire(Litz wire), not solid core wire. I am retired EE who used to work on mega size telecomm/computer site. On mil-spec wiring, I never observed stab wiring. Probalby commercial wiring is same.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
a, 12/15/2007,9:49:16 PM, wrote:

In electronics when wanting to ensure a good signal or clean power there are several fundamentals that must be observed. However when in doubt the old adage "more copper" comes to mind. If there is less surface area for current transfer from one conductor to another then resistance will build and that translates to heat. The stab type outlet has far less surface area in contact with the wire than the screw type does. This in itself is a dangerous design when you use devices that require much current draw from that outlet. I don't think it's a matter of how secure the connection is rather than the contact areas between the wire and outlet that are in question.
--
"My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating." ~
Ashleigh Brilliant
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 15 Dec 2007 22:19:07 -0500, "badgolferman"

And yet, UL approves the "stab" outlets.
I would presume they do all sorts of controlled lab tests. Their approval seal "should" be better than any folklore.
How about the Canadian testing group ? They tend to be more conservative. Do they approve "stab" outlets ?
<rj>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I just took a look at some single pole switches that I have. They have both screw and stab connections and are CSA (Canadian Standards Association) approval 99-6416-2.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

U/L listing only means the fire is constrained inside the device if it fails, not that the device actually works.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 16 Dec 2007 11:17:39 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

It is not news to anyone that does a little reading that those stabs are unreliable and crap.
The ones that get heavy use will eventually cause problems.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Terry wrote:

What do you mean by "get heavy use?" The stab lock itself, or just plugging in an appliance a lot?
a
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Yep, In the last house I lived the wife always used the same receptacle to plug the vacuum into. I plugged something in one day and a heard what sounded like a spark/sizzle sound. Pulled the cover plate and receptacle too find burn marks at one wire on the back stab.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

UL listing means exactly what it says on the listing and labeling. It complies with the standard that applies to that labeling. UL does not write the standard they just test to the standard. If the standard is inadequate don't blame UL. -- Tom Horne
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tom Horne wrote:

???They are UL standards developed by or under the leadership of UL. UL lab's reputation depends on the effectiveness of the UL standards.
Some standards may not determine if a device actually works. A lot do - fuses, GFCIs. IIRC receptacle tests include 150% of rated current. Receptacles should 'actually work' - except for the backstab feature. I can't understand how that is allowed by the standard. Other than backstabs receptacles are pretty reliable.
In addition to contact area, another problem is contact pressure.
--
bud--

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Are you publishing a book?
My personal experience won't matter then!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Oren wrote:

No.
OK.
a
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.